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Byzantium Virtues

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  • byzantiumnovumsenator
    In regard to the Virtues you speak of, since the Byzantium people considered themselves to be Romans right down to the loss of Constantinople, I can t see why
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 11, 2010
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      In regard to the Virtues you speak of, since the Byzantium people considered themselves to be Romans right down to the loss of Constantinople, I can't see why the Roman Virtues as were used in NR, are not applicable here. They certainly seemed to cover all the bases and I was quite satisfied with them and put them in my personal to do (try to do) box.

      My personal view is that Virtues can't get much better than that, and until something else better comes along I think I will stay with that particular list of things to work on to be a better person. The fact that the Roman Virtues demand continuous care in how one approaches others as well as his/hers own little world, is indicative of their value and worthiness.

      Respectfully,

      Marcus Audens
    • mpsellus
      Xairete! While talking about virtues in general is something that i don t think is very constructive (virtues at the 4th century were certainly different than
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 12, 2010
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        Xairete!
        While talking about virtues in general is something that i don t think is very constructive (virtues at the 4th century were certainly different than they were during the Comnenus Dynasty and again very different during the Palaeologus' age) and virtues for the emperors and for the peasants werent the same i ll have to extend a little my criticism so i can cover the last post too. Paul Lemerle has once said "To represent Byzantium as unchangeable for 11 centuries means that we fall in the trap Byzantium has set for us". "Virtues" were so much a subject of change that someone from 4th century would have find it way to difficult to see what he has in common with someone from 15th century i think.
        Michael Psellus

        --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, "byzantiumnovumsenator" <mmaudens42nr@...> wrote:
        >
        > In regard to the Virtues you speak of, since the Byzantium people considered themselves to be Romans right down to the loss of Constantinople, I can't see why the Roman Virtues as were used in NR, are not applicable here. They certainly seemed to cover all the bases and I was quite satisfied with them and put them in my personal to do (try to do) box.
        >
        > My personal view is that Virtues can't get much better than that, and until something else better comes along I think I will stay with that particular list of things to work on to be a better person. The fact that the Roman Virtues demand continuous care in how one approaches others as well as his/hers own little world, is indicative of their value and worthiness.
        >
        > Respectfully,
        >
        > Marcus Audens
        >
      • MMT Audens
        Michael Pseilius; Your point is well taken that Byzantium should not be treated as the same place for 11 centuries in most aspects. However, Christianity has
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 17, 2010
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          Michael Pseilius;

          Your point is well taken that Byzantium should not be treated as the same place for 11 centuries in most aspects.  However, Christianity has lasted for 18+ centuries and we are still guided by the "Ten Commandments."  Did Byzantium change significantly over that long period?  I would agree that it did.  Did people's attitudes change?  I would think so, given the efforts of those who ruled.  However, governing and improving one's character, for those who care about such, requires some standards in my view, and I know of no other such that apply to those who thought of themselves as Romans.

          In my view the Roman Virtues are as viable to me today as when they were written out.  They extend the "Ten Commandments" in several ways.  Also the Virtues to me are a set of goals, along the lines of which one hopes to improve.  I like to think that the Virtues have helped me in several ways.  Now, don't get me wrong, I can use a lot more study and effort in that paradigm, however, my thought is if I can use the Virtues today in measuring and extending my character and attitude to betterment, I would suppose that the Byzantines could do the same.  Did everyone follow the Virtues?  Probably not.  Just as many today choose not to follow Christianity.  However, the historians say, repeatedly, that the Byzantines thought of themselves as Roman right down to the loss of Constantinople.  If they thought of themselves as Romans, in my view, there had to be some standards to maintain that idea, and since I know of no other such standards, my bet is on the Roman Virtues as the standards by witch the Byzantines measured their Romanitas.

          Respectfully;

          Marcus Audens
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