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Re: [ByzantiumNovumCulture] Re: Around the Roman Table on Google Books

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  • Timothy Dawson
    ... (gulp)... recipe. I ve managed 46 years without even making an attempt yet, Well, it really isn t a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per se. So
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
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      On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
      >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
      (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
      yet,

      Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
      se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
      mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
      for me for 20 years.

      A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
      International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
      of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
      experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
      itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
      mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
      that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
      might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
      people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!

      Timothy
    • Cassius
      This may sound a bit silly, but that s great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :) Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I m
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
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        This may sound a bit silly, but that's great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :)

        Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I'm no great cook, but I do like to "create" stuff that seems like it would be tasty. If you're using the correct food basics (common meats, veggies, spices, etc) how "off topic" could that kind of cooking really be?

        -Marcus Cassius Julianus

        --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Dawson <timothy@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
        > >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
        > (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
        > yet,
        >
        > Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
        > se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
        > mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
        > for me for 20 years.
        >
        > A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
        > International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
        > of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
        > experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
        > itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
        > mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
        > that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
        > might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
        > people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!
        >
        > Timothy
        >
      • Amma Doukaina
        Well, create away and share your successful recipes! Very true that we have to kind of play by ear when we think of what was eaten in the past. Nothing more
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 13, 2011
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          Well, create away and share your successful recipes! Very true that we have to kind of play by ear when we think of what was eaten in the past. Nothing more fun than poring over medieval receipts to look for menu ideas! And much of it wasn't all that tasty you realize when you recreate it and sometimes those sauces look more like vomit than edible food. If you're a good creation cook, you can have a lot of fun just fiddling with the possibilities. Of course, I think every culture has always had its own "stuff in a pot" recipes, where this and that come together to make a totally unique dish, and I can imagine that anyone cooking for a family then, as now, looked in the pantry and came up with something amazing out of scraps and leftovers quite often. :)

          You could always take on baking, and then we'd be unable to call you off for public service. That would be a nice retirement....bake all day and know that no one would be taking you or your animals off to war.

          And since we're on the topic of food, here's an idiot-proof recipe for pork and a common method for cooking it from the Byzantine era (over a spit, of course, not in the oven). I love easy recipes.

          Pop a pork roast, fat side up in a roasting pan that has a high lid so there's plenty of room above the meat when it's covered. Find a local liquor store that sells honeymead...there are a few microbreweries that do them here in CO, but I'm certain there are others that would be elsewhere. Baste the pork roast with honeymead as you slow-roast it, several hours at around 250-300 degrees, or even on a spit if you have it.
          He who attains love cannot fall.
          
          —Saint Macarius the Great

          On 3/13/2011 5:02 PM, Cassius wrote:
           

          This may sound a bit silly, but that's great advice I honestly never thought of. Thank you! :)

          Hmm... now a list of Byzantine ingredients would be helpful. I'm no great cook, but I do like to "create" stuff that seems like it would be tasty. If you're using the correct food basics (common meats, veggies, spices, etc) how "off topic" could that kind of cooking really be?

          -Marcus Cassius Julianus

          --- In ByzantiumNovumCulture@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Dawson <timothy@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 11 Mar 2011, at 14:42, Cassius wrote:
          > >. one of these days I'm going to have to try cooking from a...
          > (gulp)... recipe. I've managed 46 years without even making an attempt
          > yet,
          >
          > Well, it really isn't a problem as there are no Byzantine recipes per
          > se. So just read some sources, get together some ingredients they
          > mention and cook something you like. Voilla! That has worked well
          > for me for 20 years.
          >
          > A point I shall be making when I give a paper on this subject at the
          > International Medieval Congress in July is that recipes are something
          > of mirage. Food is always an intensely personal and transitory
          > experience, that is often influenced by things other than the food
          > itself. So even when one has a recipe, and all the ingredients it
          > mentions, and follows it to the letter, the best that can be said is
          > that one has had an approximate impression of what someone from then
          > might have experienced on one occasion. The common factor is that
          > people will always have wanted to eat something they enjoyed. So enjoy!
          >
          > Timothy
          >

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