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Re: [Byron] Essay on Byron

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  • e-mail emmh
    Thank you, Nancy, for the summary of this article - the article sounds very interesting and the theme original on Byron s part. ... [Non-text portions of this
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2011
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      Thank you, Nancy, for the summary of this article - the article sounds very
      interesting and the theme original on Byron's part.

      On 1 February 2011 00:25, Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > I just received the Byron Journal no. 38 no.2 2010
      > Madeleine Callaghan has an essay in it The Struggle With Language in
      > Byron's Cain."
      > In this essay, Ms Callaghan brings out a point that I had never consciously
      > considered before, That point is that some things like death were unknown.
      > Adam and Eve didn't understand dying and neither did Cain. He had heard of
      > death but had no real concept of it as it applied to humans until he killed
      > Abel. -- I hope I have not misunderstood or misquoted Ms Callaghan.
      > "Word after word announces the horror of discovering, for the first time in
      > human experience, the fact of death."
      > Cain had no experience of anything and really didn't even recognize his
      > emotions.
      > "Byron's touch is sure as his poetic mode allows Cain to assume the sombre
      > notes of the tragic hero."
      > Unless, I am misunderstanding, Ms. Callaghan seems to be reputing critics
      > who complained of Cain's awkward speech. She makes that very awkwardness a
      > part of the man born too soon after the expulsion from Eden of his parents
      > into a world that had never seen a child before.
      > Just think of Cain as the first in the world to ever have a sibling and the
      > first ever to experience sibling rivalry.
      > Cain turns from God."...words transform from divine to human instruments as
      > the lines of communication between God and man are disrupted forever. The
      > discovery of the fallen meaning of language is the highly original theme of
      > Cain."
      > An English judge refused to grant a copyright to Cain because he called it
      > immoral and blasphemous.
      > Nancy Mayer
      > http://www.susannaives.com/nancyregencyresearcher/
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


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    • e-mail emmh
      Yes, that is a book I would like to have too - but ouch, £65 is bad, and in USD that s over 100. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2011
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        Yes, that is a book I would like to have too - but ouch, �65 is bad, and in
        USD that's over 100.

        On 1 February 2011 00:51, Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Peter Cochran has a review of a book I wish I could afford to buy.Though
        > Cochrane mentions some errors and omissions in the book, he praises it
        > overall.The Palgrave Literary Dictionary of Byron by Martin Garrett.
        > Palgrave Macmillan, 2010 352 pages. ISBN 978 230 00897 7 �65.00.
        > Did you know that there are Byron societies all around the world?
        > Nancy Mayer
        > http://www.susannaives.com/nancyregencyresearcher/
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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