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Fw: An interesting Blurb on Byron

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  • Nancy Mayer
    Subject: An interesting Blurb on Byron Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, April 16, 1819; Issue 408 Lord Byron – The scandalous report of
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3, 2010
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      Subject: An interesting Blurb on Byron


      Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, April 16, 1819; Issue 408



      Lord Byron – The scandalous report of Lord Byron living and reveling with two sisters when at Geneva, is positively contradicted, and satisfactorily accounted for, in the extract of a letter from Geneva to the Editor of the romantic tale of The Vampyre. The write, after giving some excellent traits of his Lordship’s character, says, “I must free him from one imputation attached to him of having in his house two sisters as the partakers of his revels. This is, like many other charges which have been brought against Lord Byron, entirely destitute of truth. His only companion was the physician, whose society was particularly sought for. The report originated from the following circumstances: Mr. Byshe Shelly, a gentleman known for his daring opinions, having taken a house below, in which he resided with Miss M.W. Godwin and Miss Clermont (the daughters of the celebrated Mr. Godwin), they were frequently visitors at Diodati, and were often seen on the Lake with his Lordship; and this gave rise to the story which is here positively denied.”


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    • Nancy Mayer
      THE MIRROR OF FASHION . The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, July 29, 1811; Issue 13173 · Lord Byron has returned to England, after an absence of
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 4, 2010
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        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, July 29, 1811; Issue 13173

        · Lord Byron has returned to England, after an absence of nearly three years on a tour through the Greek Islands.

        For the MORNING CHRONICLE .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, August 6, 1811; Issue 13180

        DIED – On Thursday last, at Newstead Abbey, the Hon. Mrs. Gordon Byron, mother of the Right Hon. Lord Byron.

        Births, Deaths, Marriages and Obituaries .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, August 8, 1811; Issue 13985

        DIED – On the 1st curt. At Newstead Abbey, after a short illness, the Hon. Mrs. Gordon Byron, the mother of the Right Hon. Lord Byron, and a lineal descendant of the Marquis of Huntley and the Princess Anabella Stuart, daughter of James the First of Scotland.

        IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, March 2, 1812; Issue 14072

        HOUSE OF LORDS – Feb. 27th – FRAME BREAKING BILL. The bill was opposed by Lords Holland, Grey, Grenville, Lauderdale, and Byron. Supported by Earls Harrowby, and Grosvenor, and the Lord Chancellor.

        THE MORNING CHRONICLE .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, March 2, 1812; Issue 13359

        · Lord Byron, who spoke on the Nottingham Felony Bill, on Thursday, evinced considerable eloquence – His talents have been already established by his literary provisions, but it does not always happen that able writers are gifted with the powers of elocution.

        THURSDAY'S POST .
        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, April 25, 1812; Issue 3078

        HOUSE OF LORDS – CATHOLIC CLAIMS. The Duke of Devonshire presented a Petition in support of Catholic Emancipation from the Roman Catholics of the County of Dublin. – The Marquis of Downshire, Lord Byron, and the Earl of Moira – supported the motion.

        THE MORNING CHRONICLE .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, June 9, 1812; Issue 13444

        The Mirror of Fashion – The Hampden Club held its second meeting yesterday at the Thatched House, Mr. Northmore in the Chair, when Lord BYRON, Mr. BOSVILLE, Mr. WAITHMAN, and a number of other candidates were elected members.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, August 27, 1812; Issue 4189

        Lord Byron is said to have sold his estate of Newstead Abbey, in Notinghamshire, for 140,000l. The principal estate of the Noble Lord are in Lancashire.

        LONDON . Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, September 12, 1812; Issue 14155

        Lord Byron has completed his sale of Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, by which he will receive L. 140,000 for a property that had been previously valued at L. 60,000.

        OPENING OF DRURY LANE THEATRE .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, October 15, 1812; Issue 14169

        At half past six, the green curtain drew up, and the whole Corps Dramatique came forward to sing "God save the King;" but so vociferous was the applause at this time, that only a few notes could be heard. "Rule Britannia" was afterwards sung, amidst the same tempest of applause. Mr. Ellison then came forward, dressed in the character of Hamlet to speak the prize address, which is from the pen of Lord Byron.

        DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE .
        The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, October 21, 1812; Issue 3380

        The new Theatre, Drury Lane, was opened on Saturday evening. An immense crowd were present to witness it. The new Theatre in its form and decorations is altogether a most beautiful and splendid edifice. The opening address was written by Lord Byron. The money taken at the doors amounted to £950.

        Wednesday's Post .
        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, October 24, 1812; Issue 4128

        Lord Byron it is reported has drawn the 20 guineas from the Treasury of New Drury for his Address, and given it to the Literary Fund.

        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Saturday, November 28, 1812; Issue 13592

        Lord Byron arrived at Batt’s New Hotel, Dover Street, yesterday from Nottinghamshire.

        SATURDAY AND SUNDAY's POSTS .
        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, December 10, 1812; Issue 4204

        Lord Byron is said to be going to reside in one of the Greek Islands.

        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Friday, December 11, 1812; Issue 13603

        Lord Byron left Batt’s New Hotel, Dover Street, yesterday on a visit to the Earl of Oxford, at his seat, Eywood, near Kington, Herefordshire.

        UNITED PARLIAMENT OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Wednesday, June 2, 1813; Issue 13751

        Several Petitions for facilitating the introduction of Christian Knowledge into India, were presented by Lord Viscount Sidmouth and Lord Byron. Ordered to lie on the table.

        Imperial Parliament .
        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, June 8, 1813

        House of Lords – Tuesday June 1st – Lord Byron presented a petition from Major Cartwright complaining of ill treatment received by himself in his exertions to procure signatures to a petition for Parliamentary Reform while at Huddersfield. After a short conversation between Earl Fitzwilliam, Lord Byron, and several other Lords, the motion "That the petition do lie on the table," was negative without division.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, December 16, 1813; Issue 4258

        Lord Byron (the poetical Peer) is, it is said, about to take a trip to Holland.

        LONDON NEWS CONTINUED .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, February 17, 1814; Issue 14382

        A morning paper says "We are informed from very good authority, that as soon as the House of Lords meets again, a Peer of independent principles and character intends to give notice of a motion occasioned by the late spontaneous avowal of verses, by Lord Byron, addressed to the Princess Charlotte of Wales, in which he has taken the most unwarrantable liberties with her august father’s character and conduct. The charge being of a personal nature, it will be necessary to give the noble satirist some days notice, that he may prepare himself for his defense, against a charge of so aggravated a nature, which may perhaps not be a fit subject for criminal prosecution, as the laws of the country, not foreseeing the probability of such a case ever occurring, under all the present circumstances, have made provision against it; but we know that each House of Parliament has a control over its own members, and that there are instances on the journals of Parliament where an individual Peer has been suspended from all privileges of the high situation to which his birth entitled him, when by any flagrant offense against good order and government, he has rendered himself unworthy of exercising so important a trust."

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, February 25, 1814; Issue 139

        The Morning Post has given it out that a Peer of independent principles is to make a motion in the Lords, at its next meeting, for calling Lord Byron to account for writing two verses on the subject of the Princess Charlotte Weeping. Precedents are glanced at; and the noble Lord is threatened to have all his high privileges suspended. The noble Lord is, however, to be allowed two or three days for his defense; the motion being of a personal nature. On this subject we may quote the noble Lord’s Motto – Crede Byron. Trust Byron. The following is a copy of the lines in question.

        Lines addressed to a young Lady, by Lord Byron.

        Weep! Daughter of a Royal Line,

        A Sire’s disgrace, a realm’s decay!

        Could wash a Father’s fault away.

        Weep, for thy Tears are Virtue’s Tears,

        Auspicious to these suffering Isles;

        And be each drop in future years,

        Repaid thee by a Nation’s smiles!

        MISCELLANEOUS .
        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, March 15, 1814

        It is confidently stated, that on the meeting of the house of lords, notice of a motion against Lord Byron will be given. The motion originates in the late spontaneous avowal of a copy of verses, by Lord Byron, addressed to Princess Charlotte of Wales, in which some strange liberties are taken with her august father’s character and conduct.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, April 22, 1814; Issue 147

        Lord Byron’s become the purchaser of Lord Sligo’s elegant apartments in the Albany, where he now resides, reclusely courting his impassioned Muse. His Lordship has recently adopted the most abstemious regimen of diet, eating no animal food whatever, and living principally, says a ministerial paper, upon boiled potatoes, moistened only with vinegar.

        ROYAL ACADEMY .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, May 3, 1814; Issue 14038

        Portrait of a Nobleman in the Dress of an Albanian, by T. PHILLIPS, No, 84; and Portrait of a Nobleman, 172, seem to be the same individual. They are both fine. They are said to be Lord Byron, though in that case we do not see why they should be incognito. They are too smooth, and seem, as it were "barbered ten times o’er," both in the face and the expression. There is, however, much that conveys the idea of the softness and the wildness of character of the popular poet of the East.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, June 3, 1814; Issue 153

        It is stated that Lord Byron with that generosity and discriminating taste which so eminently distinguish his character has presented Mr. Kean with 100 guinea.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, September 15, 1814; Issue 4297

        A few days since, Lord Byron retook possession of his ancient patrimonial seat, Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire. The purchase having been made by monies vested in trust, to be laid out to the best advantage in landed possessions, and this condition not being considered fulfilled according to the intentions of the Testator, a compromise took place, and the family estate was restored to his Lordship.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, December 31, 1814; Issue 14518

        Lord Byron sets off on Saturday morning for Durham to lead the hymenal altar the accomplished and beautiful Miss Milbanke. His lordship intends passing the honey-moon at Seahma House.

        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, January 4, 1815

        MARRIAGE – On Monday, by special license, at Seaham, Durham, by the Rev. Thomas Noel, of Kirkby, Leicestershire, the Right Hon. Lord Byron, to the accomplished Miss Milbanke, sole heiress to Sir Ralph Milbanke, Bart. They immediately set off to Halnaby, Yorkshire, a seat of the worthy Baronet, to spend the honey-moon.

        Births, Deaths, Marriages and Obituaries .
        The Examiner (London, England), Sunday, January 8, 1815; Issue 367

        On Monday the 2d instant, at Seaham, Durham, by the Rev. Thomas Noel, Rector of Kirkby Mallory, the Right Hon. Lord Byron, to Miss Milbanke, sole daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph Milbanke, Bart. There were present only Sir Ralph and Lady Milbanke, the Rev. Mr. Wallis, Rector of Seaham, and John Hobhouse, Esq. After the ceremony the happy couple left Seaham for Hannaby, in Yorkshire.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, January 21, 1815; Issue 4064

        Lord Byron’s patrimonial estates in Nottinghamshire were not long since sold at a price so much beyond any previous estimation, that the purchaser became unwilling to conclude the contract, and forfeited accordingly the sum of 10,000£.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, April 20, 1815; Issue 4328.

        Lady Byron was not at the Queen’s Drawing Room on Thursday last, as stated by mistake. The indisposition of Lord Wentworth (the uncle of Lady Byron) prevented one of the expected bridal presentation at Court.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, April 20, 1815; Issue 14565

        Lord Byron has presented a silver vase to Mr. Walter Scott, which is estimated at the value of three hundred pounds.

        Births, Deaths, Marriages and Obituaries .
        The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, April 22, 1815; Issue 2600

        DIED – On Monday, the 17th inst. At his house in Edward Street, Portman Square, the Lord Viscount Wentworth. His Lordship was in the 70th year of his age. The Viscounty is extinct, but the Barony of Wentworth, which his Lordship also possessed , descends to his sister, Lady Milbanke, whose daughter, Lady Byron, is not the next in inheritance of it.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, May 13, 1815; Issue 4079

        Wednesday at the Crown and Anchor, there was a very full attendance of the Subscribers, to deliberate upon the propriety of letting Drury Lane Theatre. After some discussion, the proposition of letting the Theatre was put to the vote, and negative by a large majority. Three names were given in as willing to undertake the management on the resignation of the present sub-committee: they were, Lord Byron, Mr. Kinnaird, and Mr. P. Moore, and it was understood that 2 more names would be furnished the first opportunity.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, May 20, 1815; Issue 4080

        The new sub-committee of Drury Lane Theatre, we understand, will be the Earl of Essex, Lord Byron, Mr. Kinnaird, Mr. Peter Moore, and Mr. Ironmonger.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, June 12, 1815; Issue 14588

        A general meeting of the proprietors of Drury Lane Theatre, was held at the Crown and Anchor tavern on Wednesday, when the following gentlemen were appointed to manage the business of the Theatre for the next three years, viz. The Earl of Essex, Lord Byron, the Hon. D. Kinnaird, the Hon. Cavendish Bradshaw, and P. Moore, Esq. Mr. Whitbread made a retiring speech on the occasion, and thanks were unanimously voted to him for his eminent past services on behalf of the concern.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Wednesday, June 14, 1815; Issue 14387

        FASHIONABLE PARTY – Mrs. Baillie’s rout on Monday evening, in Grosvenor Street, was attended by nearly 300 persons of distinction and fashion, among them were Lord and Lady Byron, Sir George and Lady Beaumont, Sir Henry and Lady Halford, Lady Rolle, Lady John Thynne, Walter Scott, Esq. &c.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, September 28, 1815; Issue 4351

        The Tragedy forthcoming at Drury Lane Theatre, is the production of Mr. Sotheby’s a Gentleman well known as a Poet and Scholar. This play has been erroneously ascribed to Lord Byron, who has, we hear, never directed his talents towards dramatic composition.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, September 28, 1815; Issue 4351

        Yesterday the Earl and Countess of MOUNTNORRIS opened their Hotel with a grand ball and supper, given on the christening of the infant son of Mr. and Lady FRANCES WEDDERBURNE WEBSTER. Lord BYRON, and Mr. CHARLES WEDDERBURNE, her Ladyship’s uncle were the sponsors.

        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, December 19, 1815; Issue 1521.

        On Sunday se’night, at his Lordship’s home, Piccadilly Terrace, London, Lady Byron of a daughter.

        Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, December 28, 1815; Issue 2625)

        The Editor of a weekly Paper, in announcing the happy accouchement of Lady Byron, who has brought her affectionate husband a daughter, congratulates the Noble Bard on this addition to his works.

        DRURY LANE THEATRE .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, January 18, 1816; Issue 14686

        After the admirable performance of Mr. Kean, on Friday last, in the character of Sir Giles Overreach, which made so strong an impression on the actors as well as the audience, we understand that his brother performers resolved to present him with a silver cup, in testimony of their admiration of his talents as an actor, and their esteem for his character as a man. A subscription was immediately entered into for the accomplishment of this object, to which Lord Byron contributed 25 guineas.

        COVENT GARDEN THEATRE .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, March 21, 1816; Issue 14713

        Among fashionables at Covent Garden Theatre, the Marquis of Wellesley, the Duchess of Roxburghe, the Marquis and Marchioness of Lansdowne, the Earl of Buckinghamshire, Lady Ponsonby, Lord F. Osborn, Lord Byron, Lord Binning, Lord Palmerston, the Earl of Newcastle, Earl of Montford, &c.

        LONDON .
        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, April 13, 1816; Issue 14723

        Lord Byron it is said is preparing to quit England for a tour on the Continent. His Lordship’s library was sold a day or two since in Pall Mall. Lady Byron is expected in town in the month of May, with her father, Sir Ralph Milbank Noel. There is no foundation for the report of legal proceedings being instituted. The separation was by mutual consent.

        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, April 16, 1816; Issue 1538.

        Lord Byron it is said, is preparing to quit England. His library was sold a day or two since in Pall Mall. The separation from his newly married wife (the daughter of Sir R. Milbank Noel) is by mutual consent.

        LONDON, APRIL 18 .
        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, April 20, 1816; Issue 3287

        Lord Byron’s Lancashire and Chesire estates, which were sold for about 170,000l. last year, are again likely to be brought to the hammer, the late purchaser not being able to make good the purchase money by quarterly payments of 20,000l. It is probable, that the whole will now be divided into lots.

        LONDON, SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 20, 1816 .
        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, April 22, 1816

        Lord Byron’s "Sketch from Private Life." Has called forth from Sir Ralph Milbanke, the father of Lady Byron, a public declaration that he knew of no conspiracy against the domestic peace of his Lordship.

        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, April 23, 1816; Issue 1539

        Recent Separation in High Life – Though the separation lf Lord and Lady Byron, has taken place by mutual consent, it is nevertheless certain that on the part of his Lordship the consent was given with great reluctance, and not till after in vain he had written three letters to her ladyship, entreating reconciliation. Lady Byron, on due consideration of all the circumstances, remained inflexible; and it may easily be conceived, that the provocation must have been great indeed which steeled a bosom so tender, and rendered obdurate the heart of one of the sweetest and most amiable creatures with which Heaven has ever blessed and adorned the society of man. – Morning Post.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, April 23, 1816; Issue 14656.

        The legal instrument of separation is signed by Lord and Lady Byron and this day the Noble Lord takes his departure for the continent.

        The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, April 27, 1816; Issue 2653

        Lady Byron whose domestic relations are now become the general subject of conversation, is the only child of Sir Ralph Milbanke, a Representative of the county of Durham, in several successive Parliaments, and married to the Hon. Lady Judith Noel, sister to the late Viscount Wentworth, on whose demise the viscounty became extinct but the Barony devolved on Lady Milbanke, who became Baroness Wentworth, in consequence of which Sir Ralph Milbanke assumed the name of Noel. The legal instrument of separation is signed by Lord and Lady Byron, and his Lordship took his departure on Sunday for Switzerland.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, April 27, 1816; Issue 4128.

        Wednesday evening, Lord Byron embarked on board the Princess Charlotte packet, at Dover, for Ostend.

        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, April 27, 1816; Issue 3288.

        Lady Byron has withdrawn herself from her Lord – this lady is daughter of Sir Ralph Milbank, who has taken the name of Noel – much altercation and useless remark in the daily papers, on his Lordship’s poetry – the defender of his Lordship (the Morn. Chron.) having stated, "that nothing but the most gross misrepresentation and malignant influence on a delicate mind could have effected the separation that had taken place between his Lordship and his lady, and that a conspiracy was formed against his domestic peace." Sir Ralph Noel, the lady’s father, has positively asserted that "no conspiracy of the kind has ever existed." – Lord Byron is one of the managers of Drury Lane Theatre, and some say, the particulars of the quarrel will be laid before the public.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, May 2, 1816; Issue 14731

        Lord Byron passed through Canterbury on Tuesday, in a carriage and four, to embark to the Continent. Greece we have heard is his ultimate destination; and his absence from England will be for several years, if not for ever. His lordship embarked at Dover on Wednesday on board the Princess Charlotte packet for Ostend, on his route to Brussels.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, May 18, 1816; Issue 4131

        A Brussels Paper of Wednesday last contains a petition from a coachmaker at Brussels, to the President of the Tribunal de Premiere Instance, stating that he had sold to Lord Byron a carriage, &c. for 1882 francs, of which he has received 847 francs, but that his Lordship, who is going away the same day refuses to pay him the remaining 1035 francs; he begs permission to seize the carriage, &c. This being granted, he put it into the hands of a proper officer, who went to signify the same to Lord Byron, and was informed by the landlord of the hotel, that his Lordship was gone, without having given him anything to pay the debt, on which the Officers seized a chaise belonging to his Lordship, as security for the amount.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, May 30, 1816; Issue 14743

        LORD BYRON – An article from the Brussels Gazette, published in a London journal, having mentioned the seizure of a carriage belonging to Lord Byron, in lieu of the purchase money of another carriage bought by the Noble Lord at that place we have authority to state, that the difference between the fact, as represented in the Gazette and the real transaction, is this; that instead of his Lordship endeavoring to defraud the coachmaker who unfairly procured from his lordship eight hundred, by taking that sum for a chariot which Lord Byron was to try by a day’s journey to Waterloo. It broke down on that journey, and together, with the eight hundred francs, was left to the honest tradesman, who came to take by force what was given to him voluntarily. His Lordship made no effort to recover any portion of his eight hundred francs; but leaving that sum as an indemnity for a damage which it might cost the coachmaker no more than a hundred to repair, departed from Brussels in a carriage purchased of an English Traveler.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, June 28, 1816; Issue 261

        GLENARVON! – Contrary to expectation, a second edition of this extraordinary production, which, however, is acknowledged to exhibit uncommon genius, has been suffered to appear. We have pretty good authority for stating it to be actually the production of Lady CAROLINE L---B, and that the real hero of the tale is Lord BYRON, who, it is reported, is about to return to England in consequence of the publication. The fair and noble author, it seems, has also indulged herself in drawing the portrait of several other of her most distinguished acquaintances.

        LONDON, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1816 .
        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 7, 1816; Issue 887

        Lord Byron has produced a new Canto to his Childe Harold, which Mr. Murray, of Albermarle Street, has purchased for 2,500l.

        The Hull Packet and Original Weekly Commercial, Literary and General Advertiser (Hull, England), Tuesday, November 5, 1816; Issue 1567

        Lord Byron has, we understand, taken his departure from Italy to revisit the coasts of Albania, and thence those favorite scenes in Greece, of which he has traced such vivid and delightful remembrances. His Lordship’s enthusiastic admiration of the wild charms of nature has in no respect abated. During his retreat amidst the romantic scenery around Geneva, his delight was to sail on the Lake whenever its surface was particularly agitated, and he has been known to continue on it a considerable part of the night, exposed to the violence of the storm, and contemplating the awful horrors of the scene.

        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Friday, November 15, 1816; Issue 14833

        Mr. KINAIRD and Lord Byron were replaced by Mr. Richard WILSON and Mr. EDWARD ELLICS; the latter of whom declined accepting the office. (Drury Lane Committee.)

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, November 28, 1816; Issue 4412

        A recent letter from Geneva mentions Lord Byron’s intention of passing the winter at Rome. He intends leaving Geneva the first week in December, accompanied by Mr. David Baillie and Mr. Hobhouse, who have been with him some time.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, May 5, 1817; Issue 14891

        Lord Byron it seems, is really employed on a drama, which he means to entitle Manfred. To prove the versatility of his powers, and the activity of his mind, it is said that he is also composing an English and Armenian grammar. There is an establishment of poor monks at Venice, under whom his Lordship is improving himself in studying the Armenian language.

        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Saturday, August 30, 1817; Issue 15079

        Lord Byron’s striking and impressive poem of The Corsair is, it is said, the foundation of an Opera preparing for Drury Lane Theatre. The Music I to be composed by Bishop, and Kean is to be the piratical hero of the piece.

        Trewman's Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Thursday, September 4, 1817; Issue 2712

        Lord Byron’s family estate of Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, consisting of upwards of three thousand acres, well ornamented with wood and water, was last week put up to auction at Garraway’s, by Farebrother, and knocked down at 96,500 guineas.

        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, January 10, 1818; Issue 3377.

        The extraordinary admiration of the public for the Poetry of Lord Byron cannot be more strongly exemplified than by stating that four thousand copies of his unpublished fourth and last Canto of Childe Harold have been already bespoken!

        THE MIRROR OF FASHION .
        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, January 13, 1818; Issue 15195

        LORD BYRON – One of the Sunday Papers had a report, which has been copied into most of the Morning Papers, that Lord Byron had died at Lausanne, in Switzerland. We have every reason to think that the account is false, for there are letters of a late date from his Lordship, written at Venice, where he had established his residence.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, January 15, 1818; Issue 15019

        LORD BYRON – One of the Sunday Papers had a report, which has been copied into most of the Morning Papers, that Lord Byron had died at Lausanne, in Switzerland. We have every reason to think that the account is false, for there are letters of a late date from his Lordship, written at Venice, where he had established his residence. Lord Byron had been twice or thrice at Lausanne, and it is highly improbable that he should have left Venice suddenly, to pay another visit to that place, and that he should have died immediately on his arrival, which must have been the case, if the rumor were true.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Thursday, January 15, 1818; Issue 15197

        To the Editor of the Morning Chronicle – Bloomsbury Square Jan. 14

        Sir,

        Observing that a report of the death of Lord Byron, at Lausanne, is in circulation, and being most anxious to allay the apprehensions of his Lordship’s numerous friends, amongst whom I know he ranks you, I beg to inform you that I received a letter from his Lordship, dated so recently as the 11th of last December, from Venice, where his Lordship had fixed his residence, and was then in perfect health.

        I remain yours, most obediently,

        John Hanson

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, January 22, 1818; Issue 15022

        Lord Byron – A letter from Venice, of the date of 21st December last, was received by a gentleman of this city, on the 11th instant, which says, "Lord Byron is here, but does not go much into society; he keeps four horses, which, with the exception of the brazen steeds of Lysipsus, are the only animals of that species n the whole of the city.

        The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Thursday, February 19, 1818; Issue 4476

        Mr. Hobhouse, the friend of Lord Byron, has just returned to this country, and we understand that he has brought with him the 4th Canto of Childe Harold, which, if we may trust report, exceeds in original imagery, poetical fire, dignity of sentiment, and grandeur of description, all the preceding parts.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, March 7, 1818; Issue 15041

        Lady Byron has for some time past suffered considerably from lowness of spirits, and is so much indisposed at her seat at Hinckly, Leicestershire, as to require the aid of a physician.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, August 10, 1818; Issue 15374.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, August 10, 1818; Issue 15374.

        Friends often feel more anxiety for a man’s character than he himself. An instance of this may be found in the denial of the claim of Lord Byron to the authorship of the three poems just published by Wilson, of Cornhill. We do not pretend to account for the means by which they fell into the Publisher’s hands; the ambiguity of the title only proves his caution. The poems speak for themselves.

        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, October 19, 1818; Issue 993

        Lord Byron still continued at Venice late in September and pursued his poetical labors with ardor. His Lordship devotes his mornings to study, and spends his evenings, in general, at the Theatre, receiving the visits of acquaintance in his Box.

        The Examiner (London, England), Sunday, November 29, 1818; Issue 570

        A new candidate has started for Westminster, who seems to have the way a good deal cleared before him. It is Mr. Hobhouse, well known to the public for his friendship with Lord Byron, his travels in Albania, and his Letters from France during the close of Napoleon’s Reign.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, December 21, 1818; Issue 15181

        Major Wildman, who has lately purchased Lord Byron’s beautiful seat, Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire, is employing upwards of 100 men in repairing and improving it.

        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, January 18, 1819; Issue 1006

        Lord Byron has just sent home another Poem; and Crabbe, who has justly and appropriately been styled, "Nature’s sternest painter, but her best," has recently disposed of a Poem, which we believe will be his last production, for 2,000 guineas.

        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, January 30, 1819; Issue 3432

        Lord Byron, one of the first of English living poets, who has been at Venice for the last two years, has presented a sum of 150 guineas to the printer Molineri, who lately suffered a great loss of property by fire.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, April 16, 1819; Issue 408

        Lord Byron – The scandalous report of Lord Byron living and reveling with two sisters when at Geneva, is positively contradicted, and satisfactorily accounted for, in the extract of a letter from Geneva to the Editor of the romantic tale of The Vampyre. The write, after giving some excellent traits of his Lordship’s character, says, "I must free him from one imputation attached to him of having in his house two sisters as the partakers of his revels. This is, like many other charges which have been brought against Lord Byron, entirely destitute of truth. His only companion was the physician, whose society was particularly sought for. The report originated from the following circumstances: Mr. Byshe Shelly, a gentleman known for his daring opinions, having taken a house below, in which he resided with Miss M.W. Godwin and Miss Clermont (the daughters of the celebrated Mr. Godwin), they were frequently visitors at Diodati, and were often seen on the Lake with his Lordship; and this gave rise to the story which is here positively denied."

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, May 6, 1819; Issue 15237

        Mr. Murray, of Albemarle Street, has on the part of Lord Byron by a letter to the public journals, denied that his Lordship is the author of the Vampyre. The work is avowed by a Mr. Polidori.

        The Examiner (London, England), Sunday, June 20, 1819; Issue 599.

        A print has appeared of Lord Byron from a drawing on stone by M. Gauci, Esq. We have not seen many drawings on stone, and such as we remember happen be of trees or shrubs; but we should guess that the original of this print is a very good one of the kind; and a gentleman better acquainted with this new class of art, says it is decidedly the best he has seen. The grain is soft and fleshy, and has the look of a chalk engraving. There is undoubted likeness in the head, only we think the face somewhat too long; neither does the expression do justice to the fineness of the poet’s countenance, intellectual or otherwise but this is an objection which it shares with more elaborate portraits. The likeness is quite good enough to be interesting. It is dedicated very appropriately to CHANDOS LEIGH, Esq. who is every way qualified to appreciate the noble original, in taste, heart, and independence.

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, July 17, 1819; Issue 4234

        Lord Byron still continues to reside at Venice. Few persons whether Venetians or his own countrymen, are suffered to enter his house. His usual plan of seeing company is in box at the opera, to which he resorts every evening.

        Jackson's Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, July 17, 1819; Issue 3456

        Lord Byron still continues to reside at Venice. Few persons whether Venetians or his own countrymen, are suffered to enter his house. His usual plan of seeing company is in box at the opera, to which he resorts every evening. He passes his time in great indolence, except as to riding. He rises very late, breakfasts, rides till dusk, dines, goes to the opera, returns home, and goes to bed. This plan is seldom broken in upon, but when interrupted by a favorite visitor – such as the bookseller -------, who is particularly honored and deservedly so, for he is a man of letters: he is an excellent scholar, well acquainted with modern languages, and particularly with English literature. As usual, his Lordship is much reserved to the world; when otherwise, to a favorite friend, he is perhaps too communicative, that is, of his private affairs and private feelings. He seems not to regret the severity of his poetical attacks. He hardly knows when he writes, and when he does it is off hand. The original copy goes to the press, and sometimes without erasure. At this moment he has no manuscript of his last Poem, Mazeppa. He sent the only one to England.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, August 21, 1819; Issue 15283

        Lady Byron is now at the Grove House at Tunbridge Wells, living in entire seclusion with her mother and child.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, October 11, 1819; Issue 15305

        A French Paper says – if we may believe English Travelers, the celebrated Lord Byron will next summer visit the Pyrenees, which he will make the scene of a romantic poem.

        The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Monday, November 15, 1819; Issue 1546

        A Paris Paper mentions, that Lord Byron, one day at Coppet, being announced at the house of Madame de Stael, several English Ladies, who had been in the room, immediately retired, and the Noble Lord, on entering, found only the author of Corinna; the writer of the anecdote remarks, that "these fair islanders, besides the indignation they feel against a faithless spouse, had also to avenge the insult offered by the Poet to the Nymphs of the Thames; for they could not forget those verses of his, in which Lord Byron, giving the apple of beauty to the Spanish Ladies, spoke of the " ‘ pale and inexpressive countenance,’ and the ‘weak and languid forms’ of the English."

        The Ipswich Journal (Ipswich, England), Saturday, November 27, 1819; Issue 4262.

        This paper also added to the above anecdote this:

        Madame de Stael, seized the opportunity to make a bon mot in the most highly seasoned taste of the French sentimental pedantry. "Cheerfully," said she, "Would I endure all the wrongs Lady Byron has suffered so I might inspire such feelings as must have dictated Lord Byron’s ‘Fare thee Well."

        Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, March 6, 1820; Issue 1795

        We hear that Lord Byron has finished two more Cantos of Don Juan; and, of course, they may be expected to appear this season.




        Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, March 27, 1820; Issue 1801

        Lord Byron has just sent over two remaining cantos of Don Juan, which are to be published immediately. They are said to possess more peculiar and striking instances of the extraordinary genius of the Noble Author than either of the parts which are already before the public.

        The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, June 10, 1820; Issue 2870

        Court of Exchequer, Monday June 5 – Lord Byron – This morning Mr. Barber and Mr. Shadwell, appeared before the Chief Baron, and moved an injunction, on the part of Mr. James Dearden, to restrain Lord George Byron, Lady Byron, and other persons prosecuting a Suit of Ejectment to recover certain possession at Rochdale, which he had bought in Lancashire, in consequence of his supposing himself the heir-at-law of a Mr. Wm. Byron, a descendant of the late Lord William Byron. The right of his Lordship was contended for by Mr. Sherman who appeared in his behalf.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Monday, July 3, 1820; Issue 15969

        The Paris papers state, that Lord Byron is expected immediately in the capital.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, July 7, 1820; Issue 474

        Paris June 28 –Lord Byron is daily expected in Paris – Lodgings are engaged for him.

        The Examiner (London, England), Sunday, July 30, 1820; Issue 657

        Accounts from Venice, after mentioning that Lord Byron has written a poem on the fate of Parga, add, that his Lordship has requested a Greek Poet, who also resides in that city, to translate this poem, and publish it in Greek before the original appears.

        The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, August 12, 1820; Issue 2879

        We are informed that Lord Byron is shortly expected in England to take his seat in the House of Peers.

        Freeman's Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Monday, August 21, 1820

        Lord Byron arrived in London on Friday.

        The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Monday, August 21, 1820; Issue 1587

        Just as the House of Lords rose on Thursday evening and the Queen had taken her departure, Lord Byron arrived in Palace Yard. His Lordship came in a curricle and pair. His Lordship had letters for Her Majesty from abroad, and being informed that she was gone, he followed her to Lady Francis’s house in St. James’s Square.

        The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 16, 1820; Issue 7510

        The report of the arrival of Lord Byron in London was erroneous. Recent letters of his lordship state, that he is at Ravenna.

        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, September 18, 1820; Issue 1093

        The statement of Lord Byron having arrived in town is incorrect he is at Ravenna.

        The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, November 21, 1820; Issue 16090

        Lady Byron is this year the Lady Patroness of the Annual Charity Ball, given in the Town Hall at Hinckley, in Leicestershire, and Sir George Crewe, Bart. the principal Steward.

        Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, December 4, 1820

        The story of the Queen having purchased an estate near Paris is repeated. It is also said that Lord Byron has bought the chateau of Petitbourg near that city.

        The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, February 14, 1821; Issue 3814

        Lord Byron has taken a house at Sevigne, a beautiful village about ten miles from Paris, where he intends to reside for some time.

        Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, February 23, 1821; Issue 507

        Lady Byron is amongst the visitors at Hastings.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, October 18, 1821; Issue 15620

        A new tragedy from the pen of Lord Byron is in the press. His Lordship has left Ravenna, crossed the Appenines, and gone to reside at Pisa.

        The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, December 22, 1821; Issue 1657

        Lord Byron has written his own life, and presented it to Mr. T. Moore, who has touched 200 guineas of Mr. Murray for the M.S.

        Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, January 14, 1822; Issue 15659

        Lord Byron has got a new literary coadjutor in Mr. Leigh Hunt, whom he has invited to reside with him at Pisa; it is stated that Lord Byron and Messrs Shelly and Hunt are about to engage in some sort of periodical work.


        Nancy Mayer
        http://www.susannaives.com/nancyregencyresearcher/

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