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Canto 14-- stanza 14

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  • nancy mayer
    The canto begins with philosophical comments on life and death. Death w which all men fear but which sometimes draws one like looking down from a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 3, 2006
      The canto begins with philosophical comments on life and death.
      Death w which all men fear but which sometimes draws one like looking
      down from a mountain and thinking about jumping. Usually one draws
      back in terror, the same terror one feels when looking into the abyss of
      one's life and thoughts.
      He was famous in his time, until he knock'd his world up with rhyme.
      His world is down about his ears and clerics preach against him but
      still he scribbles. He scribbles because it fills an hour . he
      publishes because. He writes and tosses the work on to the public to
      sink or swim and gets a satisfaction out of discovering which it will
      be. THis uncertainty adds to his reasons for writing. If he were
      certain of success he was not certain he could write.


      Paradise of pleasure and ennui palls.

      His muse gathers bits and pieces from everywhere and only too much
      truth fails to attract at first. The Muse can deal with Love, war,
      tempest -- at sea or teapots-- It offers a bird's eye view of society
      and even if his verses serve only to line portmanteaus, why then they
      will have done something for trade.



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    • nancy mayer
      When we have made our love, and gamed our gaming, Drest, voted, shone, and, may be, something more; With dandies dined; heard senators declaiming; Seen
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 3, 2006
        When we have made our love, and gamed our gaming,
        Drest, voted, shone, and, may be, something more;
        With dandies dined; heard senators declaiming;
        Seen beauties brought to market by the score,
        Sad rakes to sadder husbands chastely taming;
        There's little left but to be bored or to bore........
        ....................
        "tis said -- ...
        That no one has succeeded in describing
        The Monde, exactly as they ought to paint;...


        Then from stanza XXIII the poet talks about the lot of woman and the
        lot of child birth though he thinks perhaps having to shave every day
        could be an equal burden.
        But he says that he thinks most females would rather be female than male.
        He says that petticoat influence is used as a term of disparagement ,
        but he venerates a petticoat

        a petticoat and a glimpse of ankle.



        Juan could be all things to all people with out the coxcombry of
        certain she men .
        he did not fear a tumble when after foxes, for he could ride and
        master his horse. His skill earned praise from those who cared not for
        drawing rooms and ball rooms.
        But then he asked if men ever hunted twice.

        Nancy




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      • nancy mayer
        Juan is a guest at the Country home of Lady Adeline and Lord Henry. He mixed easily with all people and even rode to the hounds. A fox-hunt is strange to a
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 12 6:28 PM
          Juan is a guest at the Country home of Lady Adeline and Lord Henry. He
          mixed easily with all people and even rode to the hounds.
          A fox-hunt is strange to a foreigner and Juan made a few blunders
          like Riding o'er the hounds and several country gentlemen.
          But his seat and his ability on a horse were such that he elicited
          wholehearted admiration.
          This was tempered by his asking " If men ever hunted twice?"
          Juan rose early and , the women blessed him, did not fall asleep over
          dinner.
          He was an excellent listener and an even better dancer. He danced like
          a gentleman , with restraint, and even followed the music."He glanced
          like a personified Bolero."
          ( Is that supposed to be glanced ? or danced? It makes more sense with
          danced.")Or like the Hour before Aurora in a notable ceiling.
          The Duchess of Fritz-Fulke turned her attention towards him to the
          annoyance Lord Augustus Fitz-Plantagenet who had been her latest boy
          toy. When she turned her attention to Juan, people laughed at Lord Augustus.
          The only one who paid no attention was The Duke. He was absent. They
          had a marriage in which they did not fall out because they never or
          seldom saw each other.
          Lady Adeline was distressed to see her friend the Duchess act in
          such a way.
          "her friend's fragility" does not describe a physical condition but the
          state of her moral conscience.

          Then the narrator discusses friends who ae Job's comforters and all
          but says with friends like these who needs enemies.
          Of all the horrible phrases in life one of the worse is "I told you so."
          Friends say this instead of telling you what you should be doing.
          Adeline thinks Juan is inexperienced (!!) , he is, after all, six
          weeks younger than she.
          Adeline was still young enough not to cringe at knowing that all the
          books of peerage listed her date of birth.
          Adeline thought she was experienced in the world. She had been much
          sought after when she came out. She married Lord Henry, bore him a son
          and heor, and behaved with correct propriety not listening to all
          those who would lead her from the path of virtue.





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        • nancy mayer
          Lady Adeline saw that they Duchess was interested in Juan and that he did nt appear to loath the connexion. However, she feared that he , as a foreigner, did
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 10, 2006
            Lady Adeline saw that they Duchess was interested in Juan and that he
            did nt appear to loath the connexion. However, she feared that he , as
            a foreigner, did not know about juries and damages -- that is a trial
            for crim.con ( adultery) with damages assessed against the man.
            Not that she feared the Duke would destroy his marriage because of the
            most recent of Her Grace's lovers but that Lady Adeline feared a
            disturbance by Lord Augustus Fitz-Plantagenet-- the discarded acolyte

            Her Grace was also of the sort which like to cause quarrels and thought
            having a duel fought over her a compliment
            Her Grace was the sort to turn a young man's head or make a Werther of
            him in the end .
            It were better to be wed or dead than to wear a heart a lover likes to rend.
            Lady Adeline wanted to save Juan from the Duchess and all that might
            ensue and asked her husband to drop a word in Juan's ear.
            The husband declined saying he only interfered in the King's business,
            Juan actually had more brain than beard, and good rarely came from
            good advice.
            Late nature take its course, Juan would come to his senses, opposition
            only more attaches,.
            He kissed his wife like a sister and went to answer dispatches.
            he was the sort to make a good Chamberlain.
            There was something wanting in this upright, honourable, cold man---
            perhaps soul.?
            ----

            Several stanzas look to a missing element in most lives

            "Thrice happy they who have a occupation!"

            High life is a dreary void.

            Then a little gem:

            Wilberforce! thou man of black renown
            ....
            ....
            Thou moral Washington of Africa!
            But there's another little thing, I own,
            Which you should perpetrate some summer's day.
            ands set the other half of earth to rights:
            You have freed the blacks--- now pray shut up the whites.


            bald coot Alexander
            Holy three to Senegal

            'Shut up -- no, not the King, but the Pavilion,
            Or else 'twill cost us all another million."

            Shut up the world
            Let bedlam out


            and nothing much will change.






            ....







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          • nancy mayer
            Adeline had one defect-- her splendid mansion of a heart was vacant. She lived a life of rectitude, her love for her husband was that expected of a wife for
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 16, 2006
              Adeline had one defect-- her splendid mansion of a heart was vacant. She
              lived a life of rectitude, her love for her husband was that expected
              of a wife for her husband - serene an noble-- conjugal but cold.
              . She was virtuous because she had never been tempted by anyone to be
              otherwise.
              She took most things seriously and once she had an ideas it was hard
              to persuade her to abandon it. She had the strength of will called
              firmness in men when they succeed, but obstinacy in men and women
              when they are less successful.
              Lady Adeline was not now in love with Juan. if she had felt herself too
              attracted to him early in the visit she would have been able to do
              something to change matters.
              No, at first she merely was being a hostess checking on the comfort of a
              guest.

              "Love bears within its breast the very germ of change..."
              XCV
              I 've also seen some wives .....
              .... .
              Who were the very paragons of wives
              Yet made the misery of at least two lives.

              The relationship between Adeline and Juan is to wait until the next
              canto-- leaving the reader in suspense.

              Were things but only call'd by their right names
              Caesar himself would be ashamed of fame.

              Nancy




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