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Byronic heroes

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  • Mary O Connell
    I would be interested to know characters in literature, and even figures in popular culture that people consider to be Byronic heroes. Mary ... Yahoo!
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 5, 2005
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      I would be interested to know characters in literature, and even figures in popular culture that people consider to be Byronic heroes.

      Mary



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    • nancy mayer
      Mary, do you mean characters who were based on Byron -- meant to be him-- or those called Byronic in that they supposedly acted as he was said to have done? I
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 5, 2005
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        Mary, do you mean characters who were based on Byron -- meant to be
        him-- or those called Byronic in that they supposedly acted as he was
        said to have done?
        I think some one has written an essay ( though I do not have the
        reference) to Byron in literature. He is in Peacock, Disraeli, Carlyle,
        and the book by Lady Caroline Lamb, for starters.
        References to some one being byronic abound in all sorts of fiction
        from romances to science fiction. I think these are too numerous to
        count. I think the search would have to be limited to Byron as a
        character in literature set in the Regency period.
        Nancy


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      • nancy mayer
        Many people have described Heathcliffe as Byronic. I think that these might have been cinematic descriptions more than text ones, though. Some have even
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 5, 2005
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          Many people have described Heathcliffe as Byronic. I think that these
          might have been cinematic descriptions more than text ones, though.
          Some have even described James Dean ( Rebel without a cause movie
          actor) as Byronic. Several people have said that the bad boys in
          fiction today are almost always in blue jeans, with a leather jacket
          and a sulky look that some call Byronic. They usually ride motorcycles.
          Nancy

          >I would be interested to know characters in literature, and even figures in popular culture that people consider to be Byronic heroes.
          >
          >Mary
          >






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        • Anne Ridsdale Mott
          ... Well, to me, this character is handsome, dark haired, has long dark eyelashes, a devilish, sparkling smile, a facial expression of disdain, shyness or
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 5, 2005
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            At 10:03 AM 05/09/2005, you wrote:
            > Several people have said that the bad boys in
            >fiction today are almost always in blue jeans, with a leather jacket
            >and a sulky look that some call Byronic.


            Well, to me, this character is handsome, dark haired, has long dark
            eyelashes, a devilish, sparkling smile, a facial expression of
            disdain, shyness or distance and something mysterious or unspeakable
            in his past. The character is "aristocratic" in that he dresses
            fastidiously, is a gourmet/gourmand, speaks well and is well educated
            and has an elaborate life style. He takes and discards the love of
            women (who chase and stalk him) as if it is his right - if not
            obligation. This character was a staple of romantic fiction and
            drama well before our hero was born - he just happened to fill the
            job description so perfectly it has taken his name.

            Jeans and a leather jacket are the dress of the modern aristocrat and
            his motorcycle is the equivalent of a thoroughbred riding horse.

            I would be intrigued to know whether Jane Austin knew of Jack Byron
            or of his son when creating Mr. Darcy. Did art imitate life or the
            other way around? We know Annabella Milbanke read Pride and
            Prejudice between her initial rejection of Byron and her later
            seduction of him by mail. It seems unlikely she would have missed the
            connection.
          • Anne Ridsdale Mott
            As a postscript: I just bought the DVD of a TV series called Profit . It was canned in the US in 1995 after just four episodes because of the immorality of
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 5, 2005
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              As a postscript:

              I just bought the DVD of a TV series called "Profit". It was canned
              in the US in 1995 after just four episodes because of the
              "immorality" of the title character. The complete series ran to
              great success in France. The hero (an anti-hero if ever there was
              one) has all the required looks, history and life style. Truly
              Byronic, but also truly amoral, which Byron the real man was
              definitely not. Jim Profit is working from the inside to control and
              probably destroy a major corporation.

              If you are interested in a truly amazing few hours of TV see if you can find it
            • Mary O Connell
              Hello -sorry, should have been clearer. I meant the construct. Characters who follow the prototypes laid down by Byron. (Who of course was inspired by other
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 6, 2005
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                Hello -sorry, should have been clearer. I meant the construct. Characters who follow the prototypes laid down by Byron. (Who of course was inspired by other authors himself - Milton for one.)

                Mary

                nancy mayer <nmayer@...> wrote:
                Mary, do you mean characters who were based on Byron -- meant to be
                him-- or those called Byronic in that they supposedly acted as he was
                said to have done?
                I think some one has written an essay ( though I do not have the
                reference) to Byron in literature. He is in Peacock, Disraeli, Carlyle,
                and the book by Lady Caroline Lamb, for starters.
                References to some one being byronic abound in all sorts of fiction
                from romances to science fiction. I think these are too numerous to
                count. I think the search would have to be limited to Byron as a
                character in literature set in the Regency period.
                Nancy


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