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drama on Teresa Guiccioli

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  • emmh@ntlworld.com
    This years Ravenna Festival lists on its programme a dramatic production on Teresa Guiccioli : Ridono i sassi ancor della città: Teresa Guiccioli e Lord
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 8, 2005
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      This years Ravenna Festival lists on its programme a dramatic
      production on Teresa Guiccioli : 'Ridono i sassi ancor della città:
      Teresa Guiccioli e Lord Byron, un amore'. ('Ridono i sassi' is the
      first line of a scurrilous poem on the pair - i.e. 'Even the rocks are
      laughing' at Count Guiccioli.)

      It's on this month, the 26th, 27th, 28th.

      You can read about it in English here:

      http://www.ravennafestival.org/ravennafestival/scheda_programma.php?
      id=830
    • emmh@ntlworld.com
      I realize the link doesn t take you to the English notes. Try: http://www.ravennafestival.org/ravennafestival/home.php Go to the calendar on the right and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 11, 2005
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        I realize the link doesn't take you to the English notes. Try:

        http://www.ravennafestival.org/ravennafestival/home.php

        Go to the calendar on the right and click on June 26, 27, or 28. The
        play should come up; click on that and you should get the English
        version.


        On 8 Jun 2005, at 11:51, emmh@... wrote:

        > This years Ravenna Festival lists on its programme a dramatic�
        > production on Teresa Guiccioli : 'Ridono i sassi ancor della citt�:�
        > Teresa Guiccioli e Lord Byron, un amore'. ('Ridono i sassi' is the�
        > first line of a scurrilous poem on the pair - i.e. 'Even the rocks
        > are�
        > laughing' at Count Guiccioli.)
        >
        > It's on this month, the 26th, 27th, 28th.
        >
        > You can read about it in English here:
        >
        > http://www.ravennafestival.org/ravennafestival/scheda_programma.php?
        > id=830
        >
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------
        > Any list problems send to
        > awoodley@...
        > ------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > � To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Byron/
        > �
        > � To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > Byron-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > �
        > � Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        > Service.
        >
        >

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      • nancy mayer
        I found a picture frame at a garage sale which looks like a part of a Greek temple from the Partheon. It was, I thought, a perfect frame for a picture of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 11, 2005
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          I found a picture frame at a garage sale which looks like a part of a
          Greek temple from the Partheon. It was, I thought, a perfect frame
          for a picture of Byron. The only picture I had that could be cut to fit
          the frame ,though, was the one on the front of the Byron Society
          Collection brochure. Now, I have a pensive Byron framed by Greek pillars.
          Have all of you visited the Byron society collection on line or at the
          University of Delaware's memorial Hall ? According to the brochure, the
          Byron Society hopes to have facilities for research for the times and
          people of Byron's life. Newspapers and magazines of the day are also
          being collected.
          http://www.english.udel.edu/byron
          Read there about how you , too, can be a donor to the museum or the
          on-going scholarship into Byron, his works, and his era.
          Also, the Byron society of North America welcomes your membership.
          The Byron Journal is well worth the cost.
          byron@...
          Nancy


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        • nancy mayer
          Don Juan had escaped the slaughter and the rivers of blood to ride in a kibitka-- a cart that might kill him for it travelled over rough roads without
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 11, 2005
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            Don Juan had escaped the slaughter and the rivers of blood to ride in a
            kibitka-- a cart that might kill him for it travelled over rough roads
            without springs.
            Juan's companion on the journey was the child he rescued at Ishmail
            Neither sees the failing farms by which they pass == though this is
            more a hit at England which was suffering a post war slump of some
            magnitude.
            Saving the child-- though at first an inadvertent act is one of Juan's
            greatest feats-- Fame is but a din.
            THen he takes himself to task for digressing again into politics.
            Suppose we think of Juan all ready arrived and think of him in his fancy
            uniform :Love turned out as a lieutenant of artillery.
            Juan was still beardless. All Catherine's favourites looked at him in
            dislike. catherine licked her lips.
            The narrator mentions Cavalier servente-- but try as he might he can
            not get the reader to believe that Catherine sees just a nice young man
            who would be an amusing companion.







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