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Re: [Byron] "calls for freedom" (long)

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  • angela sigle
    The website at electricscotland.com lists Byron and Sir Walter Scott as the favorites of Travis, at the battle of the Alamo. It also has an extensive history
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 1, 2005
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      The website at electricscotland.com lists Byron and Sir Walter Scott as the favorites of Travis, at the battle of the Alamo. It also has an extensive history of the Gordons of Gight, who sound like Scotland's Borgia. Interesting stuff!



      nancy mayer <nmayer@...> wrote:
      May I reiterate , the idea that many men in many countries were
      influenced by Byron's works,, and quoted Byron when they looked to
      throw off what they saw as chains of a foreign power is not my idea.
      this is an idea I picked up surfing the net and reading literary
      criticism.

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    • R. Nesvet
      ... I would not want anybody to say that it never happened. That is historical revisionism. Assuredly, Byron facilitated Greece s independence (though mostly
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 1, 2005
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        > if they did find something
        > in Byron's works
        > to inspire and encourage them, far be it from us to
        > say that it never
        > happened. or that Byron's thoughts on the subject
        > did not go far enough.

        I would not want anybody to say that "it never
        happened." That is historical revisionism. Assuredly,
        Byron facilitated Greece's independence (though mostly
        by his death) and contributed to the failed efforts in
        Italy before Mazzini and others realised that to
        achieve pan-Italian solidarity they had to work with
        the church instead of against it.

        At the same time, since I like having the rights I
        have that Byron's female contemporaries didn't, I do
        not consider what he fought for to be universal human
        rights and am sceptical of blanket calls for "freedom"
        that do not include women among those who must be
        freed -- especially when he RECOGNISED the
        contradiction here -- as in when the Christian Giaour
        says of the murderer of the lover he avenges: "Did he
        but do as I had done / Had she been false to more than
        one?" Meaning, in terms of women's rights, there's no
        different between Venetian and Turkish ethics, and
        this is tragically ironic.

        I find a lot in Byron's works to inspire me, as a
        writer. He told exciting stories in beautiful
        language, at least in the "Turkish tales" and the
        late-career tragedies. I think it's fair to recognise
        areas in which his writing and actions didn't 100
        percent make sense. I really like Percy Shelley's
        writing, too, but would be the first to admit that
        it's probably biologically impossible for Keats's
        heart (as he wrote) to explode from a bad review, and
        THE CENCI needs a bit of trimming to be stageable
        because nothing new happens in Act II.

        Rebecca



        =====
        "So that they may overthrow the government they parade “liberty.” If they succeed, they will attack liberty itself."

        - Justus Lipsius, POLITICA (1589)





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      • nancy mayer
        ... I think sometimes his attitude might be described as aristocratic. he was influenced by his succeeding to the barony especial at such a young age. He was
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 1, 2005
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          >
          >
          >At the same time, his professed attitudes to the
          >PEOPLE he aspired to liberate from their oppressors
          >could be rather Protean.
          >

          I think sometimes his attitude might be described as aristocratic. he
          was influenced by his succeeding to the barony especial at such a young
          age. He was 10, and was bright enough to notice the way the peerage
          changed the way people acted towards him. he was always conscious that
          his early years were not like the other peers. I think he was too
          sensitive to this. Also, the adults around him taught him that the
          peers were somewhat superior to others. Even the headmaster who beat a
          duke for being a duke somehow made the boys understand that dukes and
          other peers were different.
          Most of Byron's class mates were not peers. It was not the usual thing
          for boys to inherit. His attitudes were formed by all of this. Sometimes
          I think it a wonder he had as many ideas of equality and freedom as he did .
          Nancy
          Nancy
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