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The Waltz

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  • nancy mayer
    I was distracted for a bit by The Waltz. And still can t get over the fact that the poem does not say anything about the comet though I had read it into it
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 11, 2004
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      I was distracted for a bit by The Waltz. And still can't get over the
      fact that the poem does not say anything about the comet though I had
      read it into it forever.
      MY other thoughts about the poem, "The WAltz" remain unchanged. Several
      people have said that this poem proved that Byron hated the waltz and
      that he was a hypocrite pretending to be scandalized by the
      dance--though the phrase used was stronger than hypocrite.
      The narrator of the Waltz is not Byron. It is a man from the country A
      man with no town bronze and no sophistication. Of course, Byron uses
      this man and his opinions to have some fun.
      One thing I have been slow to recognize in Byron's work is the ever
      present political commentary.
      he throws a dart here and a dart there at the government, & the Prince
      Regent.
      I do not know whether Byron disliked the new form of dancing in which
      a couple was more front to front than side to side. He did not dance
      that we know of because of his lameness, though no one remarked on his
      walking gait. however the comments of the narrator of the poem are
      consistent with those of an old fashioned man who does not like things
      to change. It is also consistent with contemporary opinions. There were
      letters to the editors of magazines speaking out against the
      impropriety of the dance. ( That some of these were probably written
      by the editors does not make them any less opinions). Still Byron says
      that this was a poem in praise of the waltz, even though he spends some
      lines on how the impropriety of the public embrace will lead to further
      liberties.
      I think more lines are given over to politics and other subjects than
      the dance itself.
      "Voluptuous Waltz! and dare I blaspheme?
      Thy bard forgot thy praises were his theme.
      Terpsicord forgive!-- and at every ball
      My wife --Now --- waltzes, and my daughters --shall--;
      __MY SON__( or stop-- 'tis needless to inquire--
      These little accidents should ne'er transpire;
      Some ages hence our genealogic tree
      Will wear as green a bough for him as me)--
      Waltzing shall rear, to make our name amends,
      Grandsons for me-- in heirs for all his friends.



      I think his son will be like the cuckoo bird and leave his offspring in
      the nests of others to raise.



      Nancy
    • Nancy Mayer
      I was looking up waltz on Google Book search with dates between 1800 and 1820 and came up with several-- most Byron s poem.. It was even printed in the
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 24, 2007
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        I was looking up waltz on Google Book search with dates between 1800
        and 1820 and came up with several-- most Byron's poem.. It was even
        printed in the Sporting Magazine. A woman wrote an answer
        http://books.google.com/books?id=ZCLmB52nwtkC&pg=PA5&dq=waltz+date:1800-1820&as_brr=0&ei=F1j4RpyyL5vy6wLP4ozVAQ
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