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Childe Harold Canto the Third

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  • Nancy Mayer
    Stanza III Byron says: In my youth s summer I did sing of One The wandering outlaw if his own dark mind.... Stanza IV Since my young days of passion-joy or
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 2, 2003
      Stanza III Byron says:
      In my youth's summer I did sing of One
      The wandering outlaw if his own dark mind....
      Stanza IV Since my young days of passion-joy or pain,
      Perchance my heart and harp have lost a string
      ....
      ...forgetfulness around me ,-- it shall seem
      To me, though to none else, a not ungrateful theme.
      ...
      VI
      'Tis to create and in creating live
      A being more intense, that we endow
      With form our fancy, gaining as we give
      The life image....


      BUt VIII Harold appears, He of the breast which fain no more would
      feel...
      He had drunk life to bitter dregs but now had refilled his cup with
      purer stuff.

      Harold, once more within the vortex roll'd
      On with the giddy circle, chasing Time.
      Yet with a nobler aim than in his youth's fond prime..
      Still he felt himself set apart from most people. Not in a snobbish
      way but as an outsider.
      Harold turned to nature to fill the empty spaces in his life. ( Had
      he been reading Wordsworth?)

      Self exiled Harold wanders forth again.

      Nancy
    • Anne Ridsdale Mott
      ... So true - and academics ask why write? why paint? Byron can really nail an idea sometimes - but always with a shimmer of obscurity. What is the grammar of
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 3, 2003
        At 08:29 PM 02/02/2003 -0500, you wrote:
        >VI
        >'Tis to create and in creating live
        >A being more intense, that we endow
        >With form our fancy, gaining as we give
        >The life image....

        So true - and academics ask why write? why paint?

        Byron can really nail an idea sometimes - but always with a shimmer of
        obscurity. What is the grammar of this sentence? I think the words should
        be "live a being more intense than we endow with form our fancy" Could this
        be a printer's error? Otherwise the sentence is really strange.

        Crede Byron
        Anne Ridsdale Mott
        Anne@...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jaya Bhattacharji
        ... If we do ask the question it is because writers often as it themsleves! S the academice!!
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 3, 2003
          > >VI
          > >'Tis to create and in creating live
          > >A being more intense, that we endow
          > >With form our fancy, gaining as we give
          > >The life image....
          >
          > So true - and academics ask why write? why paint?

          If we do ask the question it is because writers often as it themsleves!
          S the academice!!
        • Nancy Mayer
          ... I am on lists with many writers-- mostly of Regency romances. In discussions about writing many say the characters take on a life of their own. Also, it is
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 3, 2003
            Jaya Bhattacharji wrote:
            >
            > > >VI
            > > >'Tis to create and in creating live
            > > >A being more intense, that we endow
            > > >With form our fancy, gaining as we give
            > > >The life image....
            > >
            > > So true - and academics ask why write? why paint?
            >
            > If we do ask the question it is because writers often as it themsleves!
            > S the academice!!
            >


            I am on lists with many writers-- mostly of Regency romances. In
            discussions about writing many say the characters take on a life of
            their own.
            Also, it is well known that writers often take some aspect of their
            lives and deal with it by transforming it.
            These lines also remind me of Frankenstein, though that had not yet
            been created.
            Nancy
          • jcreighton_98 <jeff.creighton@utoronto.c
            ... of ... should ... Could this ... All the texts I ve seen read that , not than , and I think they re right. I think the problem you re having (which I
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 9, 2003
              --- In Byron@yahoogroups.com, Anne Ridsdale Mott <Anne@b...> wrote:
              > At 08:29 PM 02/02/2003 -0500, you wrote:
              > >VI
              > >'Tis to create and in creating live
              > >A being more intense, that we endow
              > >With form our fancy, gaining as we give
              > >The life image....
              >
              > So true - and academics ask why write? why paint?
              >
              > Byron can really nail an idea sometimes - but always with a shimmer
              of
              > obscurity. What is the grammar of this sentence? I think the words
              should
              > be "live a being more intense than we endow with form our fancy"
              Could this
              > be a printer's error? Otherwise the sentence is really strange.
              >
              > Crede Byron
              > Anne Ridsdale Mott
              > Anne@b...
              >


              All the texts I've seen read "that", not "than", and I think they're
              right. I think the problem you're having (which I also had, the
              first time I read these lines) is with unusual ("poetic") word order.

              Byron says: 'Tis to create, and in creating live a being more
              intense, that we endow with form our fancy.

              meaning: We endow with form our fancy, in order to create, and in
              creating live a being more intense.

              It's as if you were to say: It is to live, that I eat.

              meaning: I eat in order to live.

              Once you think of it that way, the sentence is fairly clear. We
              endow our fancy with form (i.e. take the products of our imagination
              and turn them into art or expression) in order to create, and in that
              process of creation we live a life more intense than would be
              available to us through actual, real-life experience. This follows
              along from the previous stanza (5), with its world-weary dismissal of
              real-life experience ("He who grown aged in this world of woe ... so
              that no wonder waits him", etc.).

              Hope that helps.
            • Anne Ridsdale Mott
              ... Thanks, I see that reading but I still feel his meaning is that the more intense being is felt by the creator at the moment of creation. I am probably
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 11, 2003
                At 03:47 AM 10/02/2003 +0000, you wrote:
                >Byron says: 'Tis to create, and in creating live a being more
                >intense, that we endow with form our fancy.
                >
                >meaning: We endow with form our fancy, in order to create, and in
                >creating live a being more intense.
                >
                >It's as if you were to say: It is to live, that I eat.
                >
                >meaning: I eat in order to live.

                Thanks, I see that reading but I still feel his meaning is that the more
                intense "being" is felt by the creator at the moment of creation. I am
                probably reading my own ideas into his and it is, essentially, the same.

                I have manuscript reproductions of parts of Don Juan, but not of Childe
                Harold and wondered if anyone had ever seen this line differently.

                Byron often plays with the order of subordinate clauses in his "sentences",
                but their meaning is usually very clear.

                This line isn't in Young's Concordance under "that" - although she doesn't
                have any entries for "than", at all.

                Curious.

                Byron often got extremely upset by printer's errors, although he admitted
                to being unable to punctuate ("point" as he called it) Changing some of the
                punctuation could radically change the meaning of some passages.


                Crede Byron
                Anne Ridsdale Mott
                Anne@...


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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