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lineage

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  • Nancy Mayer
    When Byron came of age and asked for his summons to Parliament, he was incensed to learn he had to prove his bona fides and his parent s marriage. He did not
    Message 1 of 4 , May 4, 2002
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      When Byron came of age and asked for his summons to Parliament, he
      was incensed to learn he had to prove his bona fides and his parent's
      marriage. He did not know that this was fairly standard procedure. I
      have discovered something else that makes this process even more
      understandable and that is that Byron is not listed in either of the
      two peerages I have as being John's son or in any way in line for the
      barony of Byron of Rochdale.
      A peerage dated 1798 : the admiral had issue, John, an officer in the
      army, born Feb. 7,1756, and died Aug. 3, 1791, married June 1779 to
      Amelia D'Arcy........ issue, Augusta Maria born January 1783......
      That is all about John.
      At that time Richard Byron was the baron's heir.
      Our Byron inherited that year, but in 1802 the entry is still that
      of the peerage in 1798.
      Nancy
    • angela sigle
      I had wondered about that. It seemed so strange that Augusta, child of an eclat and scandal, was treated so warmly, and the firstborn male like an interloper.
      Message 2 of 4 , May 4, 2002
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        I had wondered about that. It seemed so strange that Augusta, child of an
        eclat and scandal, was treated so warmly, and the firstborn male like an
        interloper. The "brat" from Aberdeen sounds almost pejorative- didn't brat
        carry connotations of bastardy? B answered a letter regarding Allegra with
        the term- so I wonder. Who would have inherited in his place, George B? B
        was always in love with his female cousins, and jealous of the males- was
        this the cause?
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Nancy Mayer" <nmayer@...>
        To: <Byron@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, May 04, 2002 6:01 PM
        Subject: [Byron] lineage


        > When Byron came of age and asked for his summons to Parliament, he
        > was incensed to learn he had to prove his bona fides and his parent's
        > marriage. He did not know that this was fairly standard procedure. I
        > have discovered something else that makes this process even more
        > understandable and that is that Byron is not listed in either of the
        > two peerages I have as being John's son or in any way in line for the
        > barony of Byron of Rochdale.
        > A peerage dated 1798 : the admiral had issue, John, an officer in the
        > army, born Feb. 7,1756, and died Aug. 3, 1791, married June 1779 to
        > Amelia D'Arcy........ issue, Augusta Maria born January 1783......
        > That is all about John.
        > At that time Richard Byron was the baron's heir.
        > Our Byron inherited that year, but in 1802 the entry is still that
        > of the peerage in 1798.
        > Nancy
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------
        > Discussing,Marino Faliero,
        > followed by - The Two Foscari and Manfred
        > This note was updated on January 29, 2002
        > ----
        > Any list problems send to
        > awoodley@...
        > ------------------------
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Nancy Mayer
        Augusta s mother had been married to a marquis and was a baroness in her own right so augusta was the honourable Augusta Byron. I have been trying to discover
        Message 3 of 4 , May 4, 2002
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          Augusta's mother had been married to a marquis and was a baroness in
          her own right so augusta was the honourable Augusta Byron. I have
          been trying to discover how the peerage compilers/publishers gathered
          their information and think that much was gleaned from questionnaires
          to the families. Also, lady Conyers' history was known. She ran off
          with a ne'er do well rather than staying with a Duke; she had four
          children, and she was a peeress in her own right-- she was a natural
          for the gossip columns and scandal sheets. The divorce had to be
          granted by parliament and parliamentary bills were printed in the
          newspapers and some magazines-- all in all, Amelia D'Arcy and her
          child were bound to be known. On the other hand, John Byron was of no
          interest after his wife died. He had no title and there was no reason
          to be interested in him after Amelia died. I can see where no one
          paid much attention to John and can even understand to some extent
          why little George Gordon Byron was of no interest in 1797 when the
          information was gathered. the Lord Byron of that time was busy raping
          the land and reducing his patrimony to nothing and I doubt cared to
          answer a questionnaire. I do not know when Richard died-- must look it
          up.
          I do not understand , though, how four years later the fact that
          William had died and that his heir was his nephew John's son was
          unknown.
          On the other hand: from what I can gather, the succession to a peerage
          has to go through several steps and most cannot be accomplished until
          the new peer is of age to take his seat in the House of lords. The
          only ones excused at this time were Roman Catholics and Lunatics. When
          the peer petitions for a summons to parliament ( I think this is
          correct)he has to present proof of lineage and the legal marriage of
          his parents before his birth. I think this was unknown to many and
          was unknown to his mother. Byron's solicitor was incompetent ( at
          best) and his guardian was ill and ,besides, never thought that the
          young man might not know. This ignorance led to those verses against
          Carlisle in English bards-- that was a mistake.

          Nancy
        • Nancy Mayer
          I was reading the peerage -- alas, unlike Sir Walter Elliot of Persuasion who only read the entry on him in the baronetage, I am not listed--- came across
          Message 4 of 4 , May 4, 2002
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            I was reading the peerage -- alas, unlike Sir Walter Elliot of
            Persuasion who only read the entry on him in the baronetage, I am not
            listed--- came across Wentworth.
            The Viscountcy Wentworth became extinct when Lady Milbanke's brother
            died. The barony and the barony of le Despenser went into abeyance
            between Lady Noel Milbanke and and his nephew -- his other sister's
            son. This was a barony which could go through the female. when
            Nathaniel Curzon, Lord Scarsdale, died, the barony of Wentworth fell
            to Lady Byron.

            1856 Barony of Wentworth
            Anne Isabella, suo jure Baroness Wentworth and Dowager Baroness Byron
            of Rochdale, also de jure Baroness Le Despenser.
            When she died in 1860, her daughter being dead, her oldest grandson
            Byron Noel King-Noel became Lord Wentworth and Lord DEspenser. he died
            in 1862 at age 26. He also had a courtesy title of Viscount Ockham
            from his father.
            When he died, his brother inherited the barony of Wentworth and the
            barony of Despenser as well as becoming Viscount Ockham. The barony
            was not a courtesy one so he could sit in the House of Lords along
            with his father.
            He is the one who defended his grandmother and published Astarte.
            Roger. When they inherited the Wentworth title the King family took
            the name Noel in addition to that of King by Royal License. A year
            later they took Milbanke by Royal license instead of Noel.
            Ralph was confirmed inthe title of Lord Wentworth in 1864 and sat in
            parliament under that title until his father died in 1893 when he
            became Earl of Lovelace.
            Ralph married Fannie Heriot in 1869 and had a daughter. he and his
            wife separated and he took the daughter Ada Mary. HIs second wife was
            the daughter of Stuart Wortley. He died suddenly 1906 literally
            dropping dead after dinner.he had no sons so the Lovelace peerage went
            to a half brother.
            The Wentworth barony went to his daughter Ada Mary. Ada Mary lived
            until 1917. The baronies went to her aunt-- her father's sister who
            had also been the child of Ada Augusta Byron KIng Noel Lovelace.
            Anne had married Wilfrid Scawen Blunt who died 1922. Anne had
            inherited much from her Byron grandfather. She traveller the world
            with her husband, learned Arabic, and was passionate about horses. She
            is known in the horse field for the stud she and her husband
            established at Crabbet. She wrote about the Bedouin tribes. She died
            near cairo and was buried there. She had been Lady Wentworth for 6
            months. As her only son had died as an infant, she was succeeded by
            her daughter who was also a noted horsewoman and breeder. She was the
            author of many books . Her son inherited the baronies as well as the
            earldom of Lytton from his father. As he has /had a son the Wentworth
            and le Despenser baronies are swallowed up in the Lytton earldom
            until there is no male heir to the earldom.
            Nancy
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