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Re : [Byron] life of Byron Moore

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  • CHARLOT Michel
    My list was only a round-about way of getting to know when the letters to Lady Melbourne were published. I have now confirmation from other sources that
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 5 2:45 AM
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      My list was only a round-about way of getting to know when the letters to
      Lady Melbourne were published. I have now confirmation from other sources
      that indeed they were first published in 1922.
      As far as I know, Lady Byron contributed to the rumours about incest without
      ever putting down the thing in public writing. H B Stowe wrote what she
      knew. The accusation of incest was rejected by Byron scholars, Annabella
      herself accused of making it up, which led to the Earl of Lovelace privately
      printing Astarte in 1905, in which he used family papers and letters to
      substantiate the incest view. His wife published a second, modified edition
      in 1921 so that this part of the evidence was now made public. This accounts
      for Murray publishing Byron's letters to Lady Melbourne soon after, in 1922.
      Of course, a number of people had read them before. The fact that this
      evidence surfaced rather late does not invalidate it. It has to be judged on
      its merits.
      Wilson Knight, in Lord Byron's Marriage the Evidence of asterisks (1957)
      takes the view that the real scandal that Annabella was trying to cover up
      was Byron's homosexuality.
      It is impossible to come to absolute certainty on such matters. The evidence
      is incomplete and conflicting. The undeniable fact is that Byron wrote that
      he felt tainted by some irredeemable fault. Was it fantasy?
      Michel Charlot


      ----------
      >De : Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...>
      >À : Byron@yahoogroups.com
      >Objet : Re: Re : [Byron] life of Byron Moore
      >Date : Mer 1 aoû 2001 4:21
      >

      > By the time these were published then, even the great minds had decided
      > the issue and were looking
      > for proof. I think they were bound to find it with their attitude.
      > I have never found any one who can say they know of a medieval saying that
      > the child of incest looks
      > like an ape.
      > Nancy
      >
      > CHARLOT Michel wrote:
      >>
      >> >From references to Byron's letters to Lady Melbourne made by Charles Du Bos
      >> (1929), André Maurois (1930) and Ethel Colburn Mayne (Life of Lady Byron
      >> 1929) it appears that these letters were first published by Murray in Lord
      >> Byron's Correspondence, 1922. Indeed in Marchand's edition of the
      >> correspondence the source of the letters is given as Murray.
      >> Michel Charlot
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
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    • MelwinKoala@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/5/2001 2:46:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... When you marry someone and they insult/treat you real bad it can have a profound effect on
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 5 10:34 AM
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        In a message dated 8/5/2001 2:46:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
        michel.charlot@... writes:


        > The undeniable fact is that Byron wrote that
        > he felt tainted by some irredeemable fault. Was it fantasy?
        >

        When you marry someone and they insult/treat you real bad it can have a
        profound effect on one's inner life. I don't know if Byron was married long
        enough, or truly cared enough, (but one would think that someone of a nature
        to be brought to tears by a play is certainly sensitive) to be affected, but
        it can't have boosted his self esteem the way his wife and later much of
        England treated him. And he does seem to be a guy who needed a bit of self
        esteem boosting.

        Leslie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nancy Mayer
        Byron suffered from what he and others called a Calvinistic sense of guilt long before 1813 or his marriage. He was an abused child and abused children have
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 5 2:14 PM
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          Byron suffered from what he and others called a Calvinistic sense of guilt long before 1813 or his
          marriage.
          He was an abused child and abused children have been known to feel that they somehow brought the
          abuse on themselves.
          Also his father abandoned him and his mother embarrassed him. As a child he felt alienated from the
          people around him. In some ways the inheritance of the barony helped fix his identity as it gave him
          a place and tied him to a family.
          His poetry proves he possessed a sensitivity which was probably not appreciated by him or his
          friends and which went against the code of behaviour of the time.
          His lameness gave him a different sensitivity. He was very bright and probably had what we call a
          photographic memory-- not in any way the usual boy of the aristocracy.
          Nancy
        • Nancy Mayer
          Found an interesting Life of Moore at the Library and a copy of his Complete works on ebay. Fancy volume. Also found vol. 8 of the Marchand series.. for the
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 9 8:21 PM
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            Found an interesting Life of Moore at the Library and a copy of his Complete works on ebay. Fancy
            volume.
            Also found vol. 8 of the Marchand series.. for the year 1821 Born for Opposition.
            I will buy the Mcgann set when I get rich.
            Bought the Mayne Life of Lady Byron.
            That book disputes one of the critics -- can't remember the name said he did not think that Lady
            Byron lied :Because she had no imagination. (!!!!)
            Any one who could imagine she could reform a husband once they were married had plenty of
            imagination ;p Actually, Mayne includes many of Anne's self analysis as well as the little
            scenarios in which she performs great deeds.
            I do not hold these against her for most of us were guilty of the same thing when we were young.
            Lady Byron may not have had any empathy, but she did have imagination.
            nancy
          • Anne Ridsdale Mott
            ... Me too ! Has anyone ever seen it in ebay? Crede Byron Anne Ridsdale Mott Anne@byronmania.com [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 10 7:23 AM
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              At 11:21 PM 8/9/01 -0400, you wrote:

              >I will buy the Mcgann set when I get rich.

              Me too !

              Has anyone ever seen it in ebay?


              Crede Byron
              Anne Ridsdale Mott
              Anne@...

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Susan
              ... From: Nancy Mayer To: Byron@yahoogroups.com Date: Thursday, August 09, 2001 8:20 PM Subject: Re: Re :
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 10 2:30 PM
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                -----Original Message-----
                From: Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...>
                To: Byron@yahoogroups.com <Byron@yahoogroups.com>
                Date: Thursday, August 09, 2001 8:20 PM
                Subject: Re: Re : [Byron] life of Byron Moore


                .
                >I do not hold these against her for most of us were guilty of the same
                thing when we were young.





                So true. I've often thought that her youth and the ' imagination ' and
                expectations that go with it didn't help the situtation. At the same time,
                however, I wonder if ANY amount of time and experience prior to her marriage
                to Byron would have resulted in a significant change in how she handled him.
                Her personality [ her need to control ] seemed so excessive that it is hard
                to imagine it being tempered with time, whether she had met Byron or not. A
                very difficult person to feel for in what I've read so far. [ someone to
                avoid, at all costs ].
                I cannot remember how old she was when she married Byron, and I am too
                lazy to dig through my nightmarish library. Does anyone know off-hand ?

                Susan
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              • Nancy Mayer
                ... Augusta shared the guilt though she was not abused. She knew her mother had been disgraced by leaving a marriage and three children to run off with a
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 13 4:16 PM
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                  > He was an abused child and abused children have been
                  > known to feel that they somehow brought the
                  > abuse on themselves.

                  Augusta shared the guilt though she was not abused. She knew her mother had been disgraced by
                  leaving a marriage and three children to run off with a ne'er do well. Though her half siblings were
                  kind to her, she was always conscious of the harm her parents had done them. I think part of her
                  shyness came from the fact that she knew people still mentioned her mother's crime. It was also
                  folly to give up being a duchess for the dubious charms of a wastrel.
                  I think, that like Victoria after her, Augusta made a vow to be good and to avoid scandal. All her
                  behaviour points towards an avoidance of scandal.

                  Nancy
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