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Sar Act II

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  • Nancy Mayer
    Sardanapalus is a hedonist but is also a man who does not see the need to win laurels with the blood of his people. Or is it that he is merely slothful? He is
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 2, 2001
      Sardanapalus is a hedonist but is also a man who does not see the need
      to win laurels with the blood of his people. Or is it that he is merely
      slothful? He is told that his attitude is not understood by his enemies
      who believe that he is just weak from soft living-- paint and pillows,
      luxury and lovers.
      It is difficult to get a handle on the man-- one minute I admire
      something he says and the next want to dismiss him with scorn.
      The slave woman loves him but does not know why. She also loves him
      enough to want to free him from his vices.

      Act Two Beleses-- a soothsayer
      The soothsayer says the evening is red in honour of the blood that will
      be shed and the end of the Assyria's empire. It should be an earthquake
      to announce such an overthrow and not a calm sun set and star rise.
      'But what is death, so it be so glorious?'Tis a sunset and mortals may
      be happy to resemble the gods but in decay."

      Arbaces enters. he thinks he would be a better ruler than sardanapalus.
      As he speaks we learn of a plot to kill the "she-king" with poisoned
      wine. He will end the house of Nimrod.
      Bel. says that the line of Nimrod was once great and Arb. says it has
      worn out.


      { Byron had many sources from which to choose material to be made into a
      poem or drama. That he chose this story has meaning beyond the meaning
      of the poem itself. In many of the speeches I hear echoes of Byron's
      words against the Prince regent, the english parliament, and castlereagh
      -- other government leaders.]

      Bel. says he fears that Arb will prove to be less than perfect in a
      different way. He tells Arb that the brightest star is Arb's natal
      planet. The soldier says his sword is his star.
      Arb. is unhappy that he is fighting a woman's war in not fighting face
      to face with a tyrant but using indirect means.
      They discuss Selemeneses and Beleses is not as certain as Arbaces that
      the Queen's brother is ready to turn coat.
      A servant comes to say the King desires their presence in the palace
      and that he has not gone to the pavilion where Arbaces had set the
      ambush.
      More to come

      Nancy
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