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an interesting piece of criticsm

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  • Nancy Mayer
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001
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    • Nancy Mayer
      ... ........... ... Some emotions are hellish, and Byron s poetry
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001
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        > For Baillie the dramatist, "Every eye is directed" towards the
        > face of anger, "unpleasing and distorted" though it is,
        > because of the lurid spectacles that anger (and other
        > violent passions) can produce. Byron enacts this theatrical
        > dictum as lyric practice, compelling mystified fascination
        > rather than sympathetic assent from his audiences, and
        > exposing his poetry to charges of insincerity and
        > sensationalism.
        ........... ...

        Some emotions are hellish, and Byron's poetry
        > based in those emotions can be malevolent indeed,
        > particularly for the Romantic reader accustomed to
        > engaging sympathetically with the speaker of the poem.
        > Byron's angry curses rebuff sympathy and introduce a set
        > of agonistic relations amongst himself, his poetry, his
        > readers, and his victims. The resulting spectacle invites
        > judgment, criticism, and uneasy voyeurism. >
        > In fact, Byron's unique style emerges under direct pressure
        > from his anger, as he develops ways to engage readers
        > despite his spite. One favorite method is to portray himself
        > as one who has patiently suffered many betrayals, who
        > endures despite having been unreasonably provoked.
        > McGann calls this role "the figure of the suffering poet,
        > whose (audience) reciprocal is the sympathetic reader"
        > ("BAL," p. 31). Yet the angry Byron frequently lets this mask
        > slip, as he plays the role of poète maudit with strong
        > overtones of vindictiveness. To this his audience typically
        > responds not with sympathy, but with a disturbed
        > fascination; by means of its angry moods, the Byronic
        > personality compels attention.
        >
        >
        >
      • susan
        ... From: Nancy Mayer To: Byron@egroups.com Date: Monday, January 01, 2001 12:06 PM Subject: Re: [Byron] an
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 1, 2001
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...>
          To: Byron@egroups.com <Byron@egroups.com>
          Date: Monday, January 01, 2001 12:06 PM
          Subject: Re: [Byron] an interesting piece of criticsm



          >> McGann calls this role "the figure of the suffering poet,
          >> whose (audience) reciprocal is the sympathetic reader"
          >> ("BAL," p. 31). Yet the angry Byron frequently lets this mask
          >> slip, as he plays the role of poète maudit with strong
          >> overtones of vindictiveness. To this his audience typically
          >> responds not with sympathy, but with a disturbed
          >> fascination; by means of its angry moods, the Byronic
          >> personality compels attention.
          >>

          > I see the attention as being largely physically based. For me the human
          body and it's expression is always there in Byron. Be it a sneer or a
          rising to one's feet to make a point, Byron hits a gut level, a real flesh
          and blood kinship and response from the reader. Reflex almost. The
          physicality of outrage, in all it's forms, is something I think Byron
          imparts and reaches very well.
          I found the criticism really interesting Nancy, thanks for
          sharing that. By the way, I watched " Onegin " for the first time this
          weekend. I'd be interested to hear what others think about it. I highly
          recommend it to our group myself, it took my breath away and had to be
          rewound to be seen a second time. I felt Byron all the way through this,
          can anyone tell me more re: this connection ? There must be a story here.
          Happy New Year everyone !!

          Susan
          >Any list problems send to
          >awoodley@...
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          >
          >
        • Nancy Mayer
          By the way, I watched Onegin for the first time this ... This is an old message but I just reread it. The question I had then was: What is Onegin? Eugene
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 24, 2001
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            By the way, I watched " Onegin " for the first time this
            > weekend. I'd be interested to hear what others think about it. I highly
            > recommend it to our group myself, it took my breath away and had to be
            > rewound to be seen a second time. I felt Byron all the way through this,
            > can anyone tell me more re: this connection ? There must be a story here.
            > Happy New Year everyone !!
            >
            >

            This is an old message but I just reread it. The question I had then
            was: What is Onegin? Eugene Onegin? That is the sum total of my
            knowledge. Why would it remind one of Byron?
            Nancy
          • susan
            ... From: Nancy Mayer To: Byron@yahoogroups.com Date: Saturday, February 24, 2001 9:51 AM Subject: Re: [Byron]
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 25, 2001
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              -----Original Message-----
              From: Nancy Mayer <nmayer@...>
              To: Byron@yahoogroups.com <Byron@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Saturday, February 24, 2001 9:51 AM
              Subject: Re: [Byron] an interesting piece of criticsm



              > This is an old message but I just reread it. The question I had then
              >was: What is Onegin? Eugene Onegin? That is the sum total of my
              >knowledge. Why would it remind one of Byron?
              >Nancy



              Immediately in the opening scene of the film ' Onegin ' I felt Byron. The
              flashbacks of society life and sexual exploits, as well as a general ennui
              re: life which the character initially embodies were very Byronic to me.
              The beauty of Ralph Fiennes in 19c garb helped visually of course...] The
              characters infatuation after the fact [ I won't tell the whole story and
              ruin it for those unfamiliar with it ] also reminded me of Byron. B.
              seemed to hang on to old loves,and perhaps enhance them by doing so long
              after they were gone. Also, the theme of being ' saved ' by the love of
              another struck me as Byronic in that I do believe there was an element of
              that ' hope ' in B.'s choice of a bride, at least for a fleeting moment. I
              have never read any of Pushkin's work, and I know absolutely nothing about
              him, but I am guessing he was greatly influenced by Byron. Though Russian,
              they were contemporaries. Does anyone know Pushkin well ? It looks like I
              just gave myself some homework...time to get reading. Anyway, I'm off to a
              brunch date, more thoughts later...


              Susan



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