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southey's letter

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  • Nancy Mayer
    More from Southey s letter later. I have read about half the book so far. Though I think that in some way-- and it may not have been a conscious
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 3, 2000
      More from Southey's letter later. I have read about half the book so
      far.
      Though I think that in some way-- and it may not have been a conscious
      decision--Byron was influenced by Southey's prose Letters from England,
      the works have little in common. However they both have a supposed
      Spanish protagonist and both use other mouths to present their own
      political and economic beliefs.
      Don Manuel is a curious (inquisitive not odd) man who likes to poke
      around in churches, kitchens, and markets. So far there is not a hint
      of romance and I doubt there will be. Dn Manuel often has harsh
      criticism for the English particularly in the matter of religion, the
      clergy, and treatment of the poor. The Spanish gentleman protests
      strongly against the current practice of supporting labourers who do not
      make enough to make ends meet instead of forcing the landlords and
      business owners to pay the people a decent wage. I can understand that
      complaint for it was made by many and was an issue that needed
      rectifying. I wonder why Southey had don manuel write so many letters
      about Roman Catholicism especially about the regret that the English do
      not venerate the Virgin Mary.

      While I love byron's poetry with its humour and satire, I must admit
      that I have found the letters better for practical information. I have
      found many pieces of information in the letters of which I was unaware.
      Don manuel speaks about the money, the food, and even the stage coaches.
      Nancy
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