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Re: The Burned Memoirs

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  • River Eirtree
    I think the best understanding of the events leading up to the burning of the memoirs and the politics involved is contained within The Late Lord Byron by
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2000
      I think the best understanding of the events leading up to the burning of
      the memoirs and the politics involved is contained within "The Late Lord
      Byron" by Doris Langley Moore. The book is wonderful at chronicling the
      post-mortem dramas and the change in Byronist attitudes with the dawning of
      Victorianism.

      I certainly believe that had Byron's memoirs survived, none of the truly
      scandalous (and inaccurate) memoirs of his acquaintances could have been
      made, and the myth of Byron would not have reached such undue proportions.
      Who knows, much of the world may have been bored with the facts.

      Do read Langley Moore as she blows open many lies both in "The Late Lord
      Byron", and "Lord Byron: Accounts Rendered". The latter is the most
      exciting Byron biography I have read and the most insightful; ironic what
      his pay receipts can reveal!

      River Eirtree
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    • River Eirtree
      Thanks everyone for your comments! Perhaps Langley Moore is harsh to the memory of Augusta; however, what is refreshing about her writing is that she states
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 2, 2000
        Thanks everyone for your comments! Perhaps Langley Moore is harsh to the
        memory of Augusta; however, what is refreshing about her writing is that she
        states when something is her opinion and when something is fact, again
        allowing the reader to make up his/her own mind. She also plays detective in
        the most creative and thorough ways, coming up with interesting hypotheses
        which are always wonderful food-for-thought, whether one agrees with her or
        not.
        Unfortunately, some of the most recent biographies of Byron are not only
        cruel to Augusta, but sympathetic to Lady Byron (both in her handlings of
        Byron post-separation and Augusta and her heirs), which IMHO is misplaced,
        and none seem to state their opinions in the objective way of Langley Moore.
        I do believe that Langley-Moore was horrified with Augusta's treatment by
        Lady Byron, especially when she pitted her own daughter against her (Medora)
        AND her conscience.

        I agree with Cate that since Thomas Moore lent out the memoirs to many
        people, including the entire English community in Switzerland, there could
        be copies he was unaware of (or perhaps counting on) that could still
        surface.

        River Eirtree
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