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April Calendar by Dave Mitsky

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  • Jo Sanders
    Hieronder enkele waarneemobjecten en gebeurtenissen voor april. Groet Jo =================================================================== April Calendar by
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 3 12:48 AM
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      Hieronder enkele waarneemobjecten en gebeurtenissen voor april.

      Groet

      Jo

      ===================================================================

      April Calendar by Dave Mitsky

      All times are UT

      4/1 The Galilean satellites Io and Callisto are both the same
      distance west of Jupiter at 3:31; maximum lunar libration of 7.0
      degrees occurs at 22:00
      4/2 Last Quarter Moon occurs at 00:50
      4/3 Daylight Saving Time begins; Jupiter subtends 44.2" and shines
      at -2.5 magnitude when it reaches opposition at 16:00; Mars is 4
      degrees north of the Moon at 22:00
      4/4 Neptune is 5 degrees north of the Moon at 9:00; the Moon is at
      perigee, subtending 32'26" from a distance of 368,493 kilometers, at
      11:00
      4/5 Uranus is 3 degrees north of the Moon at 22:00
      4/7 Mercury is 3 degrees north of the Moon at 14:00
      4/8 Mars is 0.7 degree south of Theta Capricorni today; minimum
      lunar libration of 4.6 degrees occurs at 00:00; New Moon (lunation
      1018) occurs at 20:32 - a rare hybrid eclipse, which runs from
      annular to total to annular, occurs along a narrow swath from east of
      New Zealand to Central America
      4/9 Io, Europa, and Callisto form a slanted line to the east of
      Jupiter at 4:53
      4/10 Mercury is at the descending node today; Saturn reaches eastern
      quadrature today
      4/11 Mercury is stationary at 2:00; the Moon is 0.9 degree south of
      the open star cluster the Pleiades (M45) at 22:00
      4/13 Mars (magnitude 0.8) is 1.2 degrees south of Neptune (magnitude
      7.9) at 00:00
      4/14 Jupiter is at aphelion today; Mars is 0.2 degree east of Iota
      Capricorni today
      4/15 Maximum lunar libration of 6.9 degrees occurs at 2:00
      4/16 Astronomy Day (USA); Saturn is 5 degrees south of the Moon at
      1:00; First Quarter Moon occurs at 14:37; the Moon is at apogee,
      subtending 29'33" from a distance of 404,304 kilometers, at 19:00
      4/20 Mars is 1.2 degrees north of Gamma Capricorni today
      4/21 Mercury is at aphelion
      4/22 Mars is 1.1 degrees north of Delta Capricorni today; the peak of
      the Lyrid meteor shower (10-15/hour) occurs at 10:00 - it is
      compromised by strong moonlight; Jupiter is 0.6 degree north of the
      Moon at 18:00 - and occultation occurs in part of Antarctica, the
      southern Indian Ocean, and most of the southern half of Africa
      4/24 Minimum lunar libration of 5.4 degrees occurs at 00:00; Full
      Moon (known as the Pink, Seed, Egg, Grass, or Awakening Moon) occurs
      at 10:06 - a penumbral lunar eclipse affecting the northern portion
      of the Moon takes place in North and South America
      4/26 The Moon is 1.0 degree south of Jupiter at 16:00; Mercury (0.4
      magnitude) is at greatest western elongation (27 degrees) at 17:00;
      the first magnitude star Antares (magnitude 1.1) is 0.7 degree south
      of the Moon at 23:00 - an occultation occurs in eastern Asia,
      northeast Africa, most of Europe, and parts of Great Britain
      4/29 Mars is 0.5 degree north of Iota Aquarii today; maximum lunar
      libration of 6.8 degrees occurs at 21:00; the Moon is at perigee,
      subtending 32'23" from a distance of 369,029 kilometers, at 10:00
      4/30 Uranus (magnitude 5.9) is 1.7 degrees southwest of the fourth
      magnitude star Lambda Aquarii
      4/31 Ganymede reappears from eclipse unusually close to the planet
      Jupiter at 3:21

      Times and dates for the lunar light rays predicted to occur this
      month are available at http://www.lunar-
      occultations.com/rlo/rays/rays.htm

      On April 26, Mercury can be seen a mere 4 degrees above the eastern
      horizon during its worst northern hemisphere morning apparition of
      2005. By the end of the month, Mercury's altitude increases to about
      10 degrees.

      Venus is not an easy target until early May.

      Mars travels from Capricornus to Aquarius in late April. It is
      visible low in the southeast during morning twilight.

      Located in Virgo, Jupiter reaches opposition on April 3 and is
      visible the entire night. At midnight it is due south, shining at -
      2.5 magnitude. Since Jupiter attains aphelion just 11 days after it
      reaches opposition, it will be as small and dim as possible during
      this year's opposition. For observers in the eastern United States,
      the Great Red Spot transits Jupiter's central meridian at the
      indicated UT times on the following dates: 4/1 at 2:45, 4/2 at 8:32,
      4/3 at 4:23, 4/4 at 00:15, 4/5 at 6:01, 4/6 at 1:53, 4/7 at 7:39, 4/8
      at 3:31, 4/9 at 9:17, 4/10 at 5:08, 4/11 at 1:00, 4/12 at 6:46, 4/13
      at 2:38, 4/14 at 8:24, 4/15 at 4:16, 4/16 at 00:07, 4/17 at 5:54,
      4/18 at 1:45, 4/19 at 7:32, 4/20 at 3:23, 4/21 at 9:10, 4/22 at 5:01,
      4/23 at 00:52, 4/24 at 6:39, 4/25 at 2:30, 4/26 at 8:17, 4/27 at
      4:09, 4/28 at 00:00 and 9:55, 4/29 at 5:47, and 4/30 at 1:38.

      Saturn, in western Gemini, appears particularly three-dimensional
      this month due to the prominence of its shadow on the rings to the
      east of the planet's disk. Titan is due north of the planet on the
      nights of April 4 and April 20 and is due south of it on the nights
      of April 12 and April 28. The 8th magnitude moon is due west of
      Saturn on April 8 and due east on April 16. Iapetus shines at
      brightest, 10.1 magnitude, when reaches greatest western elongation
      on April 24.

      On April 30, Uranus is 1.7 degrees southwest of the fourth magnitude
      star Lambda Aquarii.

      Neptune is 1.2 degrees north of Mars on the night of April 12/13.
      Mars subtends 6.2" and Neptune 2.2" at the time of this conjunction.

      In early April, Pluto is located 24' north-northeast of Xi
      Serpentis. During the course of the month, it moves away from the
      star in a northwesterly direction.

      A circumpolar object, Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) travels through
      Draco towards Ursa Major during April. The comet, which has faded to
      seventh magnitude, may sport a short dust tail that points away from
      Polaris. At mid-month, Comet Machholz Q2 passes to the west of the
      ninth magnitude, barred spiral galaxy NGC 4236.

      As it heads northward through Coma Berenices, the large asteroid 2
      Pallas passes to the west of the spiral galaxy M99 on April 6 and to
      the east of the spiral galaxy M98 on April 8. Pallas is less than
      30' from the fifth magnitude star 6 Comae Berenices from April 7
      through April 9.

      Seventy-five binary and multiple stars for April: h4481 (Corvus);
      Aitken 1774, Gamma Crateris, Jacob 16, Struve 3072, h4456, Burnham
      1078 (Crater); h4311, Burnham 219, N Hydrae, h4455, h4465 (Hydra); 31
      Leonis, Alpha Leonis (Regulus), h2520, Struve 1417, 39 Leonis, Struve
      1421, Gamma Leonis (Algieba), Otto Struve 216, 45 Leonis, Struve
      1442, Struve 1447, 49 Leonis, Struve 1482, 54 Leonis, Struve 1506,
      Chi Leonis, 65 Leonis, Struve 1521, Struve 1527, Struve 1529, Iota
      Leonis, 81 Leonis, 83 Leonis, Tau Leonis, 88 Leonis, 90 Leonis,
      Struve 1565, Struve 1566, 93 Leonis, h1201, S Leonis (Leo); h2517,
      Struve 1405, Struve 1432, 33 Leo Minoris, Struve 1459, 40 Leo
      Minoris, Struve 1492 (Leo Minor); Struve 1401, Struve 1441, Struve
      1456, Struve 1464, 35 Sextantis, 40 Sextantis, 41 Sextantis
      (Sextans); Struve 1402, Sturve 1415, Struve 1427, Struve 1462, Struve
      1486, Struve 1495, Struve 1510, Struve 1520, Xi Ursae Majoris, Nu
      Ursae Majoris, Struve 1541, 57 Ursae Majoris, Struve 1544, Struve
      1553, Struve 1561, Struve 1563, 65 Ursae Majoris, Otto Struve 241
      (Ursa Major)

      Challenge binary star for April: Gamma Sextantis

      One hundred deep-sky objects for April: NGC 4024, NGC 4027 (Corvus);
      NGC 3511, NGC 3513, NGC 3672, NGC 3887, NGC 3892, NGC 3955, NGC 3962,
      NGC 3981 (Crater); NGC 3091, NGC 3109, NGC 3145, NGC 3203, NGC 3242,
      NGC 3309, NGC 3585, NGC 3621, NGC 3717, NGC 3904, NGC 3936 (Hydra);
      M65, M66, M95, M96, M105, NGC 3098, NGC 3162, NGC 3177, NGC 3185, NGC
      3190, NGC 3226, NGC 3227, NGC 3300, NGC 3346, NGC 3367, NGC 3377, NGC
      3384, NGC 3389, NGC 3412, NGC 3437, NGC 3489, NGC 3495, NGC 3507, NGC
      3521, NGC 3593, NGC 3607, NGC 3608, NGC 3626, NGC 3628, NGC 3640, NGC
      3640, NGC 3646, NGC 3655, NGC 3681, NGC 3684, NGC 3686, NGC 3691, NGC
      3810, NGC 3842, NGC 3872, NGC 3900, NGC 4008 (Leo); NGC 3245, NGC
      3254, NGC 3277, NGC 3294, NGC 3344, NGC 3414, NGC 3432, NGC 3486, NGC
      3504 (Leo Minor); NGC 2990, NGC 3044, NGC 3055, NGC 3115, NGC 3156,
      NGC 3166, NGC 3169, NGC 3246, NGC 3423 (Sextans); IC 750, M97, M108,
      M109, NGC 3079, NGC 3184, NGC 3198, NGC 3310, NGC 3359, NGC 3610, NGC
      3665, NGC 3675, NGC 3738, NGC 3877, NGC 3898, NGC 3941, NGC 3953, NGC
      3998, NGC 4026 (Ursa Major)

      Challenge deep-sky object for April: Leo I
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