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Re: [BuffaloHistory] Dancing

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  • Sharon
    Hi Jerry, You have to remember that popular music changed. First came Elvis but you could dance to that. Then came the Beatles, and you could only dance to
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 28 6:11 AM
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      Hi Jerry,

      You have to remember that popular music changed. First came
      Elvis but you could dance to that. Then came the Beatles, and you
      could only dance to some of that. Dancing to hard rock was weird,
      but dancing had it's biggest rivival with disco in the 1970s. Then
      came rap and break dancing, but you had to be a acrobat to try that.
      Young people today dance to techno, but that is very high energy
      dancing.

      So real dancing has become more of a small group activity.
      Square dancing was popular in the 60s, 70s and 80s with some
      groups. I belong to the Civil War re-enacting groups and we do
      waltzes, polkas, etc. The heritage clubs tend to have national
      folk dancing too. I learned to step dance at the Irish American Club,
      and I am sure the Polish clubs still polka.

      In the 1980s, a movement toward specialized schools for the arts
      became popular after the movie Fame. Now many communities,
      including my own, have special magnet schools for kids that want
      to learn the arts, and that includes dance. They teach the old standards, ballet, tap some jazz and some folk, but dancing itself
      has become more like a type of sport, like cheerleading or band.
      But at least this makes dancing lessons affordable to all who choose
      that major.

      Does Buffalo have a public school for the arts?

      Shaorn Centanne


      gerald puckett wrote:

      > The discussion about the popularity of dancing in former years and all the dancing that was done in Buffalo made me think about how things have changed. At some point in time, not sure when, learning how to dance for males seemed to became 'uncool'. In the the older movies, there was plenty of singing and dancing. Many, if not most, films at that time were made to be entertaining. What boy preparing for a career in show business didn't learn how to tap and do other forms of dance? I don't believe learning to dance was anything to be embarassed about back then, either. Dancing was an ability and art form that was widely admired and commonly made an endeavor by males. Think of stars of the screen that were known for their dancing ability....Gene Kelly, Danny Kaye, Fred Astaire, Donald O'Connor, James Cagney, and on and on. I suppose schools, nowadays, play a part in narrowing the focus of interest for boys toward sports. There must be more to it than that, though. We!
      > re people just more cheerful and fun-loving in the 30's, 40's. & 50's....maybe even more liberated?
      > Jerry
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message to:
      > BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
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      --
      ÐÏࡱá
    • peterhassett@webtv.net
      Jerry: Coming from a chronically dance-challenged family, my older brother used to console me by advising, It doesn t matter how you dance; it s how you
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 28 7:02 AM
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        Jerry:

        Coming from a chronically dance-challenged family, my older brother used
        to console me by advising, "It doesn't matter how you dance; it's how
        you intermission that counts."

        Pete
      • Michael Starks
        THE Buffalo Academy for the Visual and Preforming Arts on Clinton Street, close to downtown, has specialized programs in theatre, dance, music and art.
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 28 7:23 AM
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          THE Buffalo Academy for the Visual and Preforming Arts on Clinton Street,
          close to downtown, has specialized programs in theatre, dance, music and
          art.

          ----------
          >From: Sharon <centans@...>
          >To: BuffaloHistory@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [BuffaloHistory] Dancing
          >Date: Thu, Feb 28, 2002, 9:11 AM
          >

          > Hi Jerry,
          >
          > You have to remember that popular music changed. First came
          > Elvis but you could dance to that. Then came the Beatles, and you
          > could only dance to some of that. Dancing to hard rock was weird,
          > but dancing had it's biggest rivival with disco in the 1970s. Then
          > came rap and break dancing, but you had to be a acrobat to try that.
          > Young people today dance to techno, but that is very high energy
          > dancing.
          >
          > So real dancing has become more of a small group activity.
          > Square dancing was popular in the 60s, 70s and 80s with some
          > groups. I belong to the Civil War re-enacting groups and we do
          > waltzes, polkas, etc. The heritage clubs tend to have national
          > folk dancing too. I learned to step dance at the Irish American Club,
          > and I am sure the Polish clubs still polka.
          >
          > In the 1980s, a movement toward specialized schools for the arts
          > became popular after the movie Fame. Now many communities,
          > including my own, have special magnet schools for kids that want
          > to learn the arts, and that includes dance. They teach the old standards,
          > ballet, tap some jazz and some folk, but dancing itself
          > has become more like a type of sport, like cheerleading or band.
          > But at least this makes dancing lessons affordable to all who choose
          > that major.
          >
          > Does Buffalo have a public school for the arts?
          >
          > Shaorn Centanne
          >
          >
          > gerald puckett wrote:
          >
          >> The discussion about the popularity of dancing in former years and all
          > the dancing that was done in Buffalo made me think about how things have
          > changed. At some point in time, not sure when, learning how to dance for
          > males seemed to became 'uncool'. In the the older movies, there was plenty
          > of singing and dancing. Many, if not most, films at that time were made to
          > be entertaining. What boy preparing for a career in show business didn't
          > learn how to tap and do other forms of dance? I don't believe learning to
          > dance was anything to be embarassed about back then, either. Dancing was
          > an ability and art form that was widely admired and commonly made an
          > endeavor by males. Think of stars of the screen that were known for their
          > dancing ability....Gene Kelly, Danny Kaye, Fred Astaire, Donald O'Connor,
          > James Cagney, and on and on. I suppose schools, nowadays, play a part in
          > narrowing the focus of interest for boys toward sports. There must be more
          > to it than that, though. We!
          >> re people just more cheerful and fun-loving in the 30's, 40's. &
          > 50's....maybe even more liberated?
          >>
          > Jerry
          >>
          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >> To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message to:
          >> BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          > --
          > ÐÏࡱá
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message to:
          > BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • Robert Wurtz
          There has always been a problem in that George s 8th grade daughter is more ready to dance than any 8th grade boy. Give the boys two years and things change.
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 28 9:29 AM
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            There has always been a problem in that George's 8th grade daughter is more
            ready to dance than any 8th grade boy. Give the boys two years and things
            change. Or at least did.

            bob
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <kkovalek@...>
            To: <BuffaloHistory@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2002 12:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [BuffaloHistory] Dancing


            I have a daughter in 8th grade in a public school. For PE recently they
            had been learning different dances such as the foxtrot, the cha-cha, the
            jitterbug and others. Then on Valentine's Day they had a school
            dance..during school time to dance all these different dances they had
            learned. They were supposed to wear something "nice"..(for my daughter
            that meant a new pair of jeans with glitter on them..but that's another
            story). I just asked her about the boys willingness to take part in
            this. She said about half the boys thought the dancing was cool, and
            some were just were okay with it and some didn't really like it. I'm
            trying to think back when I was in high school, but I suppose most of
            the guys who went to dances were there because they liked to dance, or
            at least wanted to be "close" to a girl. Otherwise, they probably would
            have stayed home. So that wouldn't be a good assessment. Maybe the
            prom would be since probably guys would tend to go to a prom even if
            they didn't like to dance. But I think Jerry is right, I don't think
            guys today dance with the enthusiasm or skill today as they did back in
            the 20's or 30's. And some of it might have to do with some of the
            music the young kids listen to today. Who could dance to some of that
            stuff anyways?

            Kathy

            gerald puckett wrote:

            >The discussion about the popularity of dancing in former years and all the
            dancing that was done in Buffalo made me think about how things have
            changed. At some point in time, not sure when, learning how to dance for
            males seemed to became 'uncool'. In the the older movies, there was plenty
            of singing and dancing. Many, if not most, films at that time were made to
            be entertaining. What boy preparing for a career in show business didn't
            learn how to tap and do other forms of dance? I don't believe learning to
            dance was anything to be embarassed about back then, either. Dancing was an
            ability and art form that was widely admired and commonly made an endeavor
            by males. Think of stars of the screen that were known for their dancing
            ability....Gene Kelly, Danny Kaye, Fred Astaire, Donald O'Connor, James
            Cagney, and on and on. I suppose schools, nowadays, play a part in
            narrowing the focus of interest for boys toward sports. There must be more
            to it than that, though. Were people just more cheerful and
            >
            Jerry
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message to:
            >BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >




            To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message to:
            BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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          • Cynthia Van Ness
            ... Think of stars of the screen that were ... Amen to that. Boys (and now girls) are being funneled ever more narrowly into sports, as though no other
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 28 10:08 AM
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              --- gerald puckett <puckaroo@...> wrote:

              Think of stars of the screen that were
              > known for their dancing ability....Gene Kelly, Danny Kaye,
              > Fred Astaire, Donald O'Connor, James Cagney, and on and on. I
              > suppose schools, nowadays, play a part in narrowing the focus
              > of interest for boys toward sports. There must be more to it
              > than that, though. Were people just more cheerful and
              > fun-loving in the 30's, 40's. & 50's....maybe even more
              > liberated?

              Amen to that.

              Boys (and now girls) are being funneled ever more narrowly into
              sports, as though no other extracurricular activities can teach
              valuable life lessons. Sports metaphors are invading more and
              more realms of life where they don't belong (not being a "good
              team player", which means whatever your supervisor wishes it to
              mean, is now grounds for dismissal--it happened to someone I
              know).

              Men in dance or theater have the same problem as women in
              sports; they are assumed to be gay and are hassled if not abused
              for it, regardless of their actual orientation. Gerry's right,
              this isn't progress. It's a sad example of how homophobia holds
              us back.

              For some interesting, off-topic reading, see the book:
              "The Stronger Women Get, The More Men Love Sports," by a woman
              athlete, Mariah Burton Nelson.

              =====
              "My heart is moved by all I cannot save:
              So much has been destroyed
              I have to cast my lot with those
              who, age after age, perversely, with no extraordinary
              power, reconstitute the world." -Adrienne Rich
              Cynthia Van Ness, bettybarcode@...
              http://cynthia.is-online.net

              __________________________________________________
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              Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
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            • Cynthia Van Ness
              For those interested in participatory dancing of all kinds in the area, see: http://www.ggw.org/~rsdn/dawny.html Dancing Around Western New York ... ===== My
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 28 10:21 AM
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                For those interested in participatory dancing of all kinds in
                the area, see:

                http://www.ggw.org/~rsdn/dawny.html
                Dancing Around Western New York

                --- Sharon <centans@...> wrote:
                > Hi Jerry,
                >
                > You have to remember that popular music changed. First came
                > Elvis but you could dance to that. Then came the Beatles, and
                > you
                > could only dance to some of that. Dancing to hard rock was
                > weird,
                > but dancing had it's biggest rivival with disco in the 1970s.
                > Then
                > came rap and break dancing, but you had to be a acrobat to try
                > that.
                > Young people today dance to techno, but that is very high
                > energy
                > dancing.
                >
                > So real dancing has become more of a small group activity.
                > Square dancing was popular in the 60s, 70s and 80s with some
                > groups. I belong to the Civil War re-enacting groups and we
                > do
                > waltzes, polkas, etc. The heritage clubs tend to have
                > national
                > folk dancing too. I learned to step dance at the Irish
                > American Club,
                > and I am sure the Polish clubs still polka.
                >
                > In the 1980s, a movement toward specialized schools for the
                > arts
                > became popular after the movie Fame. Now many communities,
                > including my own, have special magnet schools for kids that
                > want
                > to learn the arts, and that includes dance. They teach the old
                > standards, ballet, tap some jazz and some folk, but dancing
                > itself
                > has become more like a type of sport, like cheerleading or
                > band.
                > But at least this makes dancing lessons affordable to all who
                > choose
                > that major.
                >
                > Does Buffalo have a public school for the arts?
                >
                > Shaorn Centanne
                >
                >
                > gerald puckett wrote:
                >
                > > The discussion about the popularity of dancing in former
                > years and all the dancing that was done in Buffalo made me
                > think about how things have changed. At some point in time,
                > not sure when, learning how to dance for males seemed to
                > became 'uncool'. In the the older movies, there was plenty of
                > singing and dancing. Many, if not most, films at that time
                > were made to be entertaining. What boy preparing for a career
                > in show business didn't learn how to tap and do other forms of
                > dance? I don't believe learning to dance was anything to be
                > embarassed about back then, either. Dancing was an ability
                > and art form that was widely admired and commonly made an
                > endeavor by males. Think of stars of the screen that were
                > known for their dancing ability....Gene Kelly, Danny Kaye,
                > Fred Astaire, Donald O'Connor, James Cagney, and on and on. I
                > suppose schools, nowadays, play a part in narrowing the focus
                > of interest for boys toward sports. There must be more to it
                > than that, though. We!
                > > re people just more cheerful and fun-loving in the 30's,
                > 40's. & 50's....maybe even more liberated?
                > >
                > Jerry
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email
                > message to:
                > > BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                > --
                > ������
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                >
                > To unsubscribe from BuffaloHistory, send a blank email message
                > to:
                > BuffaloHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >


                =====
                "My heart is moved by all I cannot save:
                So much has been destroyed
                I have to cast my lot with those
                who, age after age, perversely, with no extraordinary
                power, reconstitute the world." -Adrienne Rich
                Cynthia Van Ness, bettybarcode@...
                http://cynthia.is-online.net

                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
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              • Cynthia Van Ness
                ... Ooops, that title is actually The Stronger Women Get, The More Men Love Football. ===== My heart is moved by all I cannot save: So much has been
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 28 4:28 PM
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                  --- Cynthia Van Ness <bettybarcode@...> wrote:

                  > For some interesting, off-topic reading, see the book:
                  > "The Stronger Women Get, The More Men Love Sports," by a woman
                  > athlete, Mariah Burton Nelson.

                  Ooops, that title is actually "The Stronger Women Get, The More
                  Men Love Football."

                  =====
                  "My heart is moved by all I cannot save:
                  So much has been destroyed
                  I have to cast my lot with those
                  who, age after age, perversely, with no extraordinary
                  power, reconstitute the world." -Adrienne Rich
                  Cynthia Van Ness, bettybarcode@...
                  http://cynthia.is-online.net

                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
                  http://greetings.yahoo.com
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