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Re: [Buddhism_101] Buddhism

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  • vorian@mail.com
    Hi, Diana, Thanks, for your reply. I did, for a time, but found the outside (I m not sure what word to use) aspects of it a little constricting. I ve been
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 28, 2004
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      Hi, Diana,
      Thanks, for your reply.
      I did, for a time, but found the outside (I'm not sure what word to use) aspects of it a little constricting. I've been moving toward Vajrayana for some time, now.
      Ken/
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Diana <monkette1@...>
      Date: Sat, 28 Feb 2004 07:11:43 -0800 (PST)
      To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Buddhism

      > Dear Ken,
      >
      > Thanks for this writing. Sounds like you practice Zen.
      > Or maybe you don't even need a Buddhist identity; just
      > practice.
      >
      > Peace in the dharma,
      > Diana
      > >
      > > Live each day to it's fullest, without attaching to
      > > any of it. Enjoy it, learn from it, feel the sadness
      > > and joy of it. Then let it go.
      > > To do this, live your life kindly, walking a course
      > > between the extremes. Love all, ignore none. Always,
      > > be open to new ideas. Find no fear in life or death,
      > > they are natural as the wind.
      > >
      > > Or not,
      > > Ken/
      > >
      > >
      >
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    • Doug Yelmen
      ken that was one of the best definitions i have come across yet. thank you, kindly. doug ... -- Irony is the courtesy of despair.
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 28, 2004
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        Re: [Buddhism_101] Buddhism
        ken
        that was one of the best definitions i have come across yet.
        thank you, kindly.

        doug







        Sorry, I've been away for a while and unable to post, but I hope to change that, now. It's been kinda quiet here, so we need to get something going.

        I've noiticed that some persons come here trying to cofirm their beliefs in a variety of things, and hoping Buddhism will back their endevour, e.g. vegetarianism, and other things (I picked that because it is the one most often used). While many Buddhists embrace some or most of the ideas expressed here, not all Buddhists embrace all. Buddhists and their mundane beliefs are as varied as there are Buddhists.
        Buddhism while in some ways simple, in other ways it is extremely complex. Samadhi/shamatha, while not necessarily easy, is the simple beginning to a wonderful practice. Knowledge of all the forms and teachings and practices is nearly impossible and interpretation of these change according to who interprets or translates.
        What I'm trying to get at is that, while Buddhists may or may not embrace these things/ideas/practices, Buddhism is not about them (any of them). Buddhism is about living for the moment. Yes, while you may sweat through the latest Buddhist tome on emptiness, or the cosmology of Buddhism, or treatises by Nagarjuna (interpreted by your latest great Lama) they all bring you back to this:

        Live each day to it's fullest, without attaching to any of it. Enjoy it, learn from it, feel the sadness and joy of it. Then let it go.
        To do this, live your life kindly, walking a course between the extremes. Love all, ignore none. Always, be open to new ideas. Find no fear in life or death, they are natural as the wind.

        Or not,
        Ken/   
             


        Yahoo! Groups Links


        -- 
        
        "Irony is the courtesy of despair."
      • castlesu@aol.com
        It seems that the group is no longer focusing on Buddhism but wandering into other topics. I would love to hear about that, particularly as I am still a
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 13, 2008
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          It seems that the group is no longer focusing on Buddhism but wandering into
          other topics. I would love to hear about that, particularly as I am still a
          learner.
          Thanks,
          Lise (with no chip on shoulder)



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        • John Pellecchia
          Lise, You re correct that at times the posts miss the mark but sometimes it s strange how a path meanders about yet, ultimately, one learns a lot about him-
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 13, 2008
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            Lise,

            You're correct that at times the posts "miss the mark" but sometimes it's strange how a path meanders about yet, ultimately, one learns a lot about him- / herself and others on the journey. I feel this is a key element in Buddhism.

            As far as focusing on Buddhism, this group is meant to be a dialogue and not a blog; so it's difficult to have a discourse with a single voice.

            As I said to Dick who presumably left the group (two days has got to be an all-time record), I don't post too often on this site (time constraints being what they are). Unfortunately, it takes me a while to formulate a reply which I was in the process of doing to one of his comments regarding meditation when he left. I do read the questions and chime in whenever possible. Some questions are way above me and I am wary of proving incorrect information

            But you must agree there has been a paucity of questions forthcoming from the membership of late. I generally attribute this to the "summer doldrums"—people are caught up in pursuing other activities.

            So, if you have a question or want to discuss some aspect it's best to post. Remember, we are all still learners. I'm confident those in this group who are more knowledgeable than I will be able to answer. As I always told my students, a question unasked is a missed opportunity. I'm sure others would agree.

            May all be at peace.

            John


            Conviction is a person's highest wealth.
            Dhamma, when well-practiced, brings bliss.
            Truth is the highest of savors.
            Living with discernment, one's life is called best.


            (Sutta Nipata I,10)



            ----- Original Message ----
            From: "castlesu@..." <castlesu@...>
            To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com

            It seems that the group is no longer focusing on Buddhism but wandering into other topics. I would love to hear about that, particularly as I am still a learner.
            Thanks,
            Lise (with no chip on shoulder)
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