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Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New and naive

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  • Jay Andrew Allen
    Shamatha is what the Tibetan tradition calls Calm Abiding meditation. This Wikipedia entry is actually quite good in discussing shamatha, and how it differs
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 30, 2008
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      "Shamatha" is what the Tibetan tradition calls Calm Abiding meditation. This
      Wikipedia entry is actually quite good in discussing shamatha, and how it
      differs from (and also compliments) the Prajna or Wisdom practices of
      Buddhism:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samatha

      Hope that helps. :)

      -J-

      On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 6:47 PM, owlet5 <bjpnest@...> wrote:

      > J
      > Thank you for your reply. I've been "attempting" meditation for a
      > number of months using the counting breaths method. I know it will
      > take time and practice for me to be comfortable with it. I'm not
      > sure of the term shamatha. Would you explain? Thank you for your
      > advice.
      > O
      >
      > --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com <Buddhism_101%40yahoogroups.com>, "Jay
      > Andrew Allen"
      > <divinitydancer@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > My personal advice would be to find a teacher who can give you basic
      > > meditation instructions. Failing that, grab a book by a Buddhist
      > teacher
      > > which contains some basic shamatha meditation instructions. That in
      > itself
      > > will be a great benefit. You can continue that basic practice while
      > you read
      > > more and decide precisely which path you wish to pursue.
      > >
      > > With Love and Laughter,
      > >
      > > -J-
      > >
      > > On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 8:51 AM, owlet5 <bjpnest@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Hello, Every one,
      > > > I am very new to Buddhism (a year) and don't really know where to
      > > > start. I was brought up Roman Catholic, but to be honest, it
      > scared
      > > > the living daylights out of me. I've looked at other belief
      > systems,
      > > > and Buddhism just stood out as "right". From initial readings, I
      > have
      > > > discovered that Mahayana seems closest to my heart. But,
      > everything
      > > > seems so complicated and convoluted at this point, and I'm not
      > sure
      > > > where to turn. I know that I'm not ready for a specific teacher,
      > but
      > > > I'm hoping this group will be able to give me some guidance onto
      > the
      > > > path. I would dearly love to find a pronunciation guide to all
      > the new
      > > > terms I'm learning.
      > > > Thank you for your patience,
      > > > Owl
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > http://www.whengaiametbuddha.com/
      > >
      > > "Technology amplifies the egoic dysfunction in human beings." -
      > Eckhart
      > > Tolle
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >



      --
      http://www.whengaiametbuddha.com/

      "Technology amplifies the egoic dysfunction in human beings." - Eckhart
      Tolle


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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