Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hello....

Expand Messages
  • theseitzies
    I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I have been interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now. I have studied various sources of information on
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 29, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I have been
      interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now. I have studied
      various sources of information on the subject and I truly love the
      teachings. But, unfortunately, it just doesn't seem to sink in. I
      would absolutely LOVE to say "I am a Buddhist", but I do not feel that
      I am in a place to say that. I try to focus on loving kindness and
      goodwill towards all living things. But it is forced and if I do not
      completely focus on following the path, I quickly revert back to my
      animal mind.

      Does anyone have any insight or advice for someone in my position?
    • Genevieve (Martinez Dybka) Longtin
      I completely feel the same way. I have studied and practiced, but it still feels incomplete. I know there is so much more, but I don t know how to get there.
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I completely feel the same way. I have studied and practiced, but it
        still feels incomplete. I know there is so much more, but I don't
        know how to get there. There are sanghas in various places in SD
        County, but I don't want to walk into a practice as dumb and blind as
        I feel, without some confidence that I am NOT going to make a total
        fool of myself.

        I concur with Tracie - if anyone can point me in the right direction,
        I would greatly appreciate it.

        --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "theseitzies" <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I have been
        > interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now. I have studied
        > various sources of information on the subject and I truly love the
        > teachings. But, unfortunately, it just doesn't seem to sink in. I
        > would absolutely LOVE to say "I am a Buddhist", but I do not feel that
        > I am in a place to say that. I try to focus on loving kindness and
        > goodwill towards all living things. But it is forced and if I do not
        > completely focus on following the path, I quickly revert back to my
        > animal mind.
        >
        > Does anyone have any insight or advice for someone in my position?
        >
      • Julie J.
        I guess I am a bit further along, but still in the same boat. I do consider myself to be Buddhists and will claim that as my belief if anyone ever asks.
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I guess I am a bit further along, but still in the same boat. I do consider myself to be Buddhists and will claim that as my belief if anyone ever asks. There are no local study centers near where I live. I am left with reading books, internet info and corresponding with other like minded people through email. It isn't my ideal situation, but it's what there is, so I keep plugging along.

          I have times when I feel like I'm making progress and I have many more times when I feel like my efforts are futile. I try to keep looking at the big picture rather than the day to day set backs. It helps some.

          Here's my list of things that help keep me going:
          *find other like minded individuals, even if that's through email, but if you have the opportunity to go in person I think that would be better
          *keep to a schedule, whether it's meditation each morning, a quiet walk with the dog to reflect, a quiet word of thanks before meals...reading before bed. It helps keep me on track and helps to put belief into practice.
          *reflect each day before sleep what went well and what you plan to do differently the next day
          *keep putting one foot in front of the other

          I also found comfort in the idea that there are various levels of coming to understand Buddhism...personal fulfillment... wanting peace and fulfillment for everyone else..to true enlightenment. I understand that I am in the beginning of that process. I am okay with wanting to understand the teachings for myself right now, holding to the understanding that the rest will come.

          And when all else fails I go back to my comfort book, "The Art of Happiness" It was the very first book I read about Buddhism. For me it's like chocolate for the soul.

          HTH
          Julie

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Padma Rubiales
          I just joined the list. I call myself Buddhist because I agree with their principles. I agree with loving kindness, compassion, generosity, nonviolence. I
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I just joined the list.

            I call myself Buddhist because I agree with their principles. I agree with loving kindness, compassion, generosity, nonviolence. I believe there are "higher" or "better" states of mind to which we can gain access. I put them in quotes because from the Buddhist perspective, nothing is better than anything else, and ultimately, it's all empty -- has no inherent existence.

            But on a practical level, (called the "relative level"), do I feel peaceful all the time? Heck no! I still get outraged each and every day because of the idiots on the road who do dangerous and illegal things, take my rights from me, endanger me and themselves and others. I feel discouraged because I'm no closer to that elusive peaceful state of mind. But I still feel like a Buddhist because I agree with Buddhism in principle.

            We all have to start with where we are. I think Pema Chodron, a convert nun to Tibetan Buddhism, has a book called Start Where you Are or something like that. I would recommend her books and tapes. She's funny, she's American I believe, and so she's been where we are and she's made good progress in her life devoted to Buddhism.

            It's not like we have to have a peaceful mind to be a Buddhist. If you have a totally peaceful mind, then there is nothing more to practice! You've already achieved it. We all have to start wherever we are and work towards it.

            Get some good books. Ask this list or your friends which books inspired them. Read about the Buddhist masters and saints of the past. Read current books by teachers, Thich Nat Hahn, Pema Chodron. Trungpa Rinpoche, etc. See if there is a Shambhala center near you, if you are interested in Tibetan Buddhism, and attend the talks by the teachers coming through. When you see peace in action through teachers who have achieved peace thru meditation and study, etc, you will have more faith in the teachings and the possible outcomes. And it's truly a blessing to be around a master. In Tibetan Buddhism, and I suspect in most Buddhist paths, having a master is very important. You can shop for one! Read books, go to talks, and find one that speaks in a way you understand, and then hang out with them as much as you can and ask for advice on your practice.

            There are ways to work with our "animal" mind. Most of the teachers I've been exposed to say you don't hate yourself for your negative thoughts. You try to not act on them. You try to start watching your mind, recognizing your patterns, seeing your triggers. You learn how to see it differently, how to work with the "energy" that those emotions bring up. And there are techniques -- typical stuff like take a deep breath, and hold it a few seconds. Realize that you are not your emotion. Pay attention to your senses -- what do you see, hear, smell? When you are angry, you are all up in your head. Reconnecting to the body helps bring you back to earth. I learned those technqiues from Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist master in Seattle Washington. He has a whole DVD series on working with emotions.

            I converted to Tibetan Buddhism almost 2 years ago. It's my second go-round with long years and other pursuits between my two entrances into Buddhism, but I always felt like a Buddhist. I see the wisdom in it and I believe it can work, even if I have a long way to go still.

            -Padma


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kristin Ballantine
            It is so wonderful to hear real feelings of truth about how you feel. My opinion is this: If all of us didn t feel like this at one point or another in our
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              It is so wonderful to hear "real" feelings of truth
              about how you feel. My opinion is this: If all of us
              didn't feel like this at one point or another in our
              lives, we would be as perfect and as enlightened as
              Buddha himself.

              We are animals, and our challenge as beings is to
              realize that our human bodies are just a vehicle. We
              may take our entire lives to not struggle with wanting
              to belong, or to be embarrassed, or confused, etc.
              etc.

              If you feel some connection toward the Dharma
              teachings, take what works for you and apply it to
              your life. Continue your meditation practice. Even
              look at other structured religions or philosophies and
              learn thier teachings. We are all in the same boat,
              my friends.

              Out of all of the organized groups I have come across,
              Buddhists to me are very caring and welcoming, no
              matter what your background/belief/religion is.
              Compassion toward all beings is their main belief. I
              go to different Sanghas all of the time- from
              different sects of Buddhism. I see the value in all
              of the different Dharma teachings.

              love,
              Kristin
              --- "Genevieve (Martinez Dybka) Longtin"
              <gen_longtin@...> wrote:

              > I completely feel the same way. I have studied and
              > practiced, but it
              > still feels incomplete. I know there is so much
              > more, but I don't
              > know how to get there. There are sanghas in various
              > places in SD
              > County, but I don't want to walk into a practice as
              > dumb and blind as
              > I feel, without some confidence that I am NOT going
              > to make a total
              > fool of myself.
              >
              > I concur with Tracie - if anyone can point me in the
              > right direction,
              > I would greatly appreciate it.
              >
              > --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "theseitzies"
              > <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I
              > have been
              > > interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now.
              > I have studied
              > > various sources of information on the subject and
              > I truly love the
              > > teachings. But, unfortunately, it just doesn't
              > seem to sink in. I
              > > would absolutely LOVE to say "I am a Buddhist",
              > but I do not feel that
              > > I am in a place to say that. I try to focus on
              > loving kindness and
              > > goodwill towards all living things. But it is
              > forced and if I do not
              > > completely focus on following the path, I quickly
              > revert back to my
              > > animal mind.
              > >
              > > Does anyone have any insight or advice for
              > someone in my position?
              > >
              >
              >
              >




              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              Need a vacation? Get great deals
              to amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.
              http://travel.yahoo.com/
            • ken
              Tracie, Welcome to this group. First I should admit that I don t consider myself a true Buddhist either. I don t know that I ll ever (in this lifetime anyway)
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Tracie,

                Welcome to this group.

                First I should admit that I don't consider myself a true Buddhist
                either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this lifetime anyway) be a real
                Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person. It's more that I had
                beliefs and found that those beliefs jived pretty good with what I
                starting hearing and reading about Buddhism. The more Buddhism I read,
                the more connections I found with what I already believed.

                What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily doctrinaire Buddhism. But
                then I've found that Buddhism is the least doctrinaire of any of the
                major religions (and most minor ones) that I've learned about. I've
                also found that there's many ways to understand something. So while
                there might be another explanation to what I'll say, I don't think that
                what I say is contrary to Buddhism.


                A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in Buddhism there's said to be
                many paths up the mountain. She meant that religions other than
                Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be. But it's also true just
                within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one and the same path, which
                all Buddhists must take. There's many paths. Though it might not be
                the easiest, but I believe you could even create your own path. Perhaps
                in the end each of us must to some degree make our own path. So no one
                has to worry about veering from "the path" because, in the end, it can
                still lead up the mountain.

                In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't to say, "I'm a
                Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much pressure, too much
                stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me to avoid-- "avoid" in
                the sense of dealing with life in a way that produces no stress or
                pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying about being a good
                Buddhist or staying on some path, might be helping me to be a better
                Buddhist, at least in one way.

                At the same time, the experience of stress and pressure can be helpful.
                As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes my way." Since he's not
                around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I believe Lao-tse would say,
                "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we can learn from it."
                What I've tried to do with stress and pressure is to notice when I'm
                feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*-- and think about how it's
                occurring, from whom or from where or from what is it originating. This
                does two things: one is that, merely by noticing the stress, we distance
                ourselves from that stress and so don't experience it immediately-- that
                is, we experience it mediated by our contemplation of it, sort of a
                second-hand experience of stress, almost as if it's somebody else's
                stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress, that pressure, may become
                the stress and pressure of the samsara world and only something we
                observe from afar, detached from it by our noticing of it.

                Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we become more sensitive to
                it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it sooner in its development.
                If we notice it sooner, we have more of an opportunity to find a way to
                defuse a situation before it becomes too intense. For example, being
                around quite a few high intensity people over the years, I noticed that
                they would do silly things when their stress level climbed too high. I
                have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if he couldn't get
                something to do what he wanted and end up smashing it. His life was a
                history of smashed radios, computers, cars, motorcycles, pens, windows,
                people, and even an airplane. None of this did him any good, in fact it
                was more self-defeating than anything else. Once his stress level rose
                too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By noticing it early, I
                could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if this would work." By
                participating in what he was doing, yet in a calm way, by opening up
                other options to doing something, and by encouraging more thought, all
                or some of these would, most of the time, help him avoid stress and
                bring some calm to the situation. Of course I had to learn to do this
                myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in the world, helped me a
                great deal to create calm for myself.

                And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes-- often-- we want to *find*
                calm. But in some situations it just isn't there to be found. Instead
                we have to create it. We have to steer a situation towards a calm which
                doesn't exist unless we do or say something.

                But is this little thing-- just noticing stress and somehow steering
                towards a created calm-- is this enough to help us reach nirvana?
                Frankly I don't know enough about getting into nirvana, so I can't say.
                I'm guessing it couldn't hurt though. And it's much preferable to a
                trail of smashed appliances. Moreover, other people will notice your
                calm and might take it up for themselves. That makes the world better
                too. And the ability to notice the advent of stress and turn it into
                calm is a talent much like what we seek to learn in meditation. I'm not
                very good at sitting cross-legged, so I practice more this kind of
                existential meditation... a walking-around kind of noticing-meditating.
                And, unfortunately, I don't always do the best thing. But mistakes are
                part of the process too, especially if I notice them and learn from
                them... which I try to do. Mistakes somehow create stress, but noticing
                them and doing better the next time helps to heal those past mistakes
                and makes calm out of them. So again it's just noticing stress and
                creating calm.

                So, yeah, it's a little thing, but that makes it easy to practice and
                it's possible to do just about all the time, when alone and when with
                other people. In that way it's a little like just walking. Doing it
                requires no membership, no batteries, no heavy equipment. It get easier
                to do the more you do it. Other people can pick up on it and you can do
                it together. It might even be fun. I hope nirvana's fun. If it's not,
                if I get there and find it's no fun, I'm going to complain. :)






                On 08/29/2007 08:25 PM somebody named theseitzies wrote:
                > I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I have been
                > interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now. I have studied
                > various sources of information on the subject and I truly love the
                > teachings. But, unfortunately, it just doesn't seem to sink in. I
                > would absolutely LOVE to say "I am a Buddhist", but I do not feel that
                > I am in a place to say that. I try to focus on loving kindness and
                > goodwill towards all living things. But it is forced and if I do not
                > completely focus on following the path, I quickly revert back to my
                > animal mind.
                >
                > Does anyone have any insight or advice for someone in my position?
                >
                >

                --
                Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like Just-Hold-It potty training.
              • pemayeshe2003
                Hello! Thanks so much for sharing your comments. I think all of them were right on the money. I too have had teachings from Ponlop Rinpoche and Pema Chodron
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hello! Thanks so much for sharing your comments. I think all of them were right on the
                  money. I too have had teachings from Ponlop Rinpoche and Pema Chodron while attending
                  Naropa. I'd also add Reggie Ray to your list of teachers that point towards body awareness
                  in dharma practice. Thanks again and be well.
                  Bob
                • Genevieve (Martinez Dybka) Longtin
                  I can not thank you all enough for your thoughtful and sage advice. I did not expect anything like this when I posted my reply to Tracie, and I was stunned to
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I can not thank you all enough for your thoughtful and sage advice. I
                    did not expect anything like this when I posted my reply to Tracie,
                    and I was stunned to open my email and find these wonderful notes from
                    everyone. You have truly blessed my day. Thank you.


                    --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "pemayeshe2003" <vajra@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello! Thanks so much for sharing your comments. I think all of
                    them were right on the
                    > money. I too have had teachings from Ponlop Rinpoche and Pema
                    Chodron while attending
                    > Naropa. I'd also add Reggie Ray to your list of teachers that point
                    towards body awareness
                    > in dharma practice. Thanks again and be well.
                    > Bob
                    >
                  • theseitzies
                    Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It is nice to know that I am not missing the point....I m just on the journey to find it and that if I don t give
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 30, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It is nice to know
                      that I am not missing the point....I'm just on the journey to find
                      it and that if I don't give up, it will come in its own time.

                      How important do you all feel it is to be part of a Buddhist
                      group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as a Buddhist on ones
                      own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my area, but I work 2nd
                      shift making it to attend during the week. I try to spend any extra
                      time I have with my husband, because I barely see him...so the
                      weekends are out as well.


                      --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken <gebser@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Tracie,
                      >
                      > Welcome to this group.
                      >
                      > First I should admit that I don't consider myself a true Buddhist
                      > either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this lifetime anyway) be
                      a real
                      > Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person. It's more that I
                      had
                      > beliefs and found that those beliefs jived pretty good with what I
                      > starting hearing and reading about Buddhism. The more Buddhism I
                      read,
                      > the more connections I found with what I already believed.
                      >
                      > What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily doctrinaire
                      Buddhism. But
                      > then I've found that Buddhism is the least doctrinaire of any of
                      the
                      > major religions (and most minor ones) that I've learned about.
                      I've
                      > also found that there's many ways to understand something. So
                      while
                      > there might be another explanation to what I'll say, I don't think
                      that
                      > what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
                      >
                      >
                      > A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in Buddhism there's said
                      to be
                      > many paths up the mountain. She meant that religions other than
                      > Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be. But it's also true
                      just
                      > within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one and the same path,
                      which
                      > all Buddhists must take. There's many paths. Though it might not
                      be
                      > the easiest, but I believe you could even create your own path.
                      Perhaps
                      > in the end each of us must to some degree make our own path. So
                      no one
                      > has to worry about veering from "the path" because, in the end, it
                      can
                      > still lead up the mountain.
                      >
                      > In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't to say, "I'm a
                      > Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much pressure, too much
                      > stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me to avoid-- "avoid"
                      in
                      > the sense of dealing with life in a way that produces no stress or
                      > pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying about being a good
                      > Buddhist or staying on some path, might be helping me to be a
                      better
                      > Buddhist, at least in one way.
                      >
                      > At the same time, the experience of stress and pressure can be
                      helpful.
                      > As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes my way." Since
                      he's not
                      > around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I believe Lao-tse would
                      say,
                      > "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we can learn from
                      it."
                      > What I've tried to do with stress and pressure is to notice when
                      I'm
                      > feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*-- and think about how
                      it's
                      > occurring, from whom or from where or from what is it
                      originating. This
                      > does two things: one is that, merely by noticing the stress, we
                      distance
                      > ourselves from that stress and so don't experience it immediately--
                      that
                      > is, we experience it mediated by our contemplation of it, sort of a
                      > second-hand experience of stress, almost as if it's somebody else's
                      > stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress, that pressure, may
                      become
                      > the stress and pressure of the samsara world and only something we
                      > observe from afar, detached from it by our noticing of it.
                      >
                      > Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we become more
                      sensitive to
                      > it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it sooner in its
                      development.
                      > If we notice it sooner, we have more of an opportunity to find a
                      way to
                      > defuse a situation before it becomes too intense. For example,
                      being
                      > around quite a few high intensity people over the years, I noticed
                      that
                      > they would do silly things when their stress level climbed too
                      high. I
                      > have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if he couldn't get
                      > something to do what he wanted and end up smashing it. His life
                      was a
                      > history of smashed radios, computers, cars, motorcycles, pens,
                      windows,
                      > people, and even an airplane. None of this did him any good, in
                      fact it
                      > was more self-defeating than anything else. Once his stress level
                      rose
                      > too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By noticing it early, I
                      > could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if this would work."
                      By
                      > participating in what he was doing, yet in a calm way, by opening
                      up
                      > other options to doing something, and by encouraging more thought,
                      all
                      > or some of these would, most of the time, help him avoid stress and
                      > bring some calm to the situation. Of course I had to learn to do
                      this
                      > myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in the world, helped
                      me a
                      > great deal to create calm for myself.
                      >
                      > And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes-- often-- we want to
                      *find*
                      > calm. But in some situations it just isn't there to be found.
                      Instead
                      > we have to create it. We have to steer a situation towards a calm
                      which
                      > doesn't exist unless we do or say something.
                      >
                      > But is this little thing-- just noticing stress and somehow
                      steering
                      > towards a created calm-- is this enough to help us reach nirvana?
                      > Frankly I don't know enough about getting into nirvana, so I can't
                      say.
                      > I'm guessing it couldn't hurt though. And it's much preferable
                      to a
                      > trail of smashed appliances. Moreover, other people will notice
                      your
                      > calm and might take it up for themselves. That makes the world
                      better
                      > too. And the ability to notice the advent of stress and turn it
                      into
                      > calm is a talent much like what we seek to learn in meditation.
                      I'm not
                      > very good at sitting cross-legged, so I practice more this kind of
                      > existential meditation... a walking-around kind of noticing-
                      meditating.
                      > And, unfortunately, I don't always do the best thing. But
                      mistakes are
                      > part of the process too, especially if I notice them and learn from
                      > them... which I try to do. Mistakes somehow create stress, but
                      noticing
                      > them and doing better the next time helps to heal those past
                      mistakes
                      > and makes calm out of them. So again it's just noticing stress and
                      > creating calm.
                      >
                      > So, yeah, it's a little thing, but that makes it easy to practice
                      and
                      > it's possible to do just about all the time, when alone and when
                      with
                      > other people. In that way it's a little like just walking. Doing
                      it
                      > requires no membership, no batteries, no heavy equipment. It get
                      easier
                      > to do the more you do it. Other people can pick up on it and you
                      can do
                      > it together. It might even be fun. I hope nirvana's fun. If
                      it's not,
                      > if I get there and find it's no fun, I'm going to complain. :)
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On 08/29/2007 08:25 PM somebody named theseitzies wrote:
                      > > I am new to this board. My name is Tracie and I have been
                      > > interested in Buddhism for at least 6 years now. I have studied
                      > > various sources of information on the subject and I truly love
                      the
                      > > teachings. But, unfortunately, it just doesn't seem to sink
                      in. I
                      > > would absolutely LOVE to say "I am a Buddhist", but I do not
                      feel that
                      > > I am in a place to say that. I try to focus on loving kindness
                      and
                      > > goodwill towards all living things. But it is forced and if I
                      do not
                      > > completely focus on following the path, I quickly revert back to
                      my
                      > > animal mind.
                      > >
                      > > Does anyone have any insight or advice for someone in my
                      position?
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > --
                      > Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like Just-Hold-It potty
                      training.
                      >
                    • Kristin Ballantine
                      You can most definitely grow on your own. There are many resources out there nowadays. If you have access to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 31, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        You can most definitely grow on your own. There are
                        many resources out there nowadays. If you have access
                        to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
                        Buddhist Dharma talks. Books, cd's, internet web
                        sites. One web sited I've found that is a "directory"
                        of resources is www.buddhanet.net.
                        If you can ever get to a center to meet other
                        Buddhists in your community, I highly encourage it. If
                        not, maybe take a short week-end/retreat for
                        yourself, go to a meditation workshop at Shambhala in
                        Colorado- I hear it's beautiful there. Or the Kripalu
                        Center also has Buddhist guest lecturer workshops
                        several times a year also.

                        Hope this helps!
                        Kristin
                        --- theseitzies <lzx8ml@...> wrote:

                        > Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It is
                        > nice to know
                        > that I am not missing the point....I'm just on the
                        > journey to find
                        > it and that if I don't give up, it will come in its
                        > own time.
                        >
                        > How important do you all feel it is to be part of
                        > a Buddhist
                        > group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as a
                        > Buddhist on ones
                        > own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my
                        > area, but I work 2nd
                        > shift making it to attend during the week. I try to
                        > spend any extra
                        > time I have with my husband, because I barely see
                        > him...so the
                        > weekends are out as well.
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken
                        > <gebser@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Tracie,
                        > >
                        > > Welcome to this group.
                        > >
                        > > First I should admit that I don't consider myself
                        > a true Buddhist
                        > > either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this
                        > lifetime anyway) be
                        > a real
                        > > Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person.
                        > It's more that I
                        > had
                        > > beliefs and found that those beliefs jived pretty
                        > good with what I
                        > > starting hearing and reading about Buddhism. The
                        > more Buddhism I
                        > read,
                        > > the more connections I found with what I already
                        > believed.
                        > >
                        > > What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily
                        > doctrinaire
                        > Buddhism. But
                        > > then I've found that Buddhism is the least
                        > doctrinaire of any of
                        > the
                        > > major religions (and most minor ones) that I've
                        > learned about.
                        > I've
                        > > also found that there's many ways to understand
                        > something. So
                        > while
                        > > there might be another explanation to what I'll
                        > say, I don't think
                        > that
                        > > what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in
                        > Buddhism there's said
                        > to be
                        > > many paths up the mountain. She meant that
                        > religions other than
                        > > Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be.
                        > But it's also true
                        > just
                        > > within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one
                        > and the same path,
                        > which
                        > > all Buddhists must take. There's many paths.
                        > Though it might not
                        > be
                        > > the easiest, but I believe you could even create
                        > your own path.
                        > Perhaps
                        > > in the end each of us must to some degree make our
                        > own path. So
                        > no one
                        > > has to worry about veering from "the path"
                        > because, in the end, it
                        > can
                        > > still lead up the mountain.
                        > >
                        > > In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't
                        > to say, "I'm a
                        > > Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much
                        > pressure, too much
                        > > stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me to
                        > avoid-- "avoid"
                        > in
                        > > the sense of dealing with life in a way that
                        > produces no stress or
                        > > pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying
                        > about being a good
                        > > Buddhist or staying on some path, might be helping
                        > me to be a
                        > better
                        > > Buddhist, at least in one way.
                        > >
                        > > At the same time, the experience of stress and
                        > pressure can be
                        > helpful.
                        > > As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes my
                        > way." Since
                        > he's not
                        > > around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I believe
                        > Lao-tse would
                        > say,
                        > > "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we
                        > can learn from
                        > it."
                        > > What I've tried to do with stress and pressure is
                        > to notice when
                        > I'm
                        > > feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*-- and
                        > think about how
                        > it's
                        > > occurring, from whom or from where or from what is
                        > it
                        > originating. This
                        > > does two things: one is that, merely by noticing
                        > the stress, we
                        > distance
                        > > ourselves from that stress and so don't experience
                        > it immediately--
                        > that
                        > > is, we experience it mediated by our contemplation
                        > of it, sort of a
                        > > second-hand experience of stress, almost as if
                        > it's somebody else's
                        > > stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress, that
                        > pressure, may
                        > become
                        > > the stress and pressure of the samsara world and
                        > only something we
                        > > observe from afar, detached from it by our
                        > noticing of it.
                        > >
                        > > Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we
                        > become more
                        > sensitive to
                        > > it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it
                        > sooner in its
                        > development.
                        > > If we notice it sooner, we have more of an
                        > opportunity to find a
                        > way to
                        > > defuse a situation before it becomes too intense.
                        > For example,
                        > being
                        > > around quite a few high intensity people over the
                        > years, I noticed
                        > that
                        > > they would do silly things when their stress level
                        > climbed too
                        > high. I
                        > > have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if
                        > he couldn't get
                        > > something to do what he wanted and end up smashing
                        > it. His life
                        > was a
                        > > history of smashed radios, computers, cars,
                        > motorcycles, pens,
                        > windows,
                        > > people, and even an airplane. None of this did
                        > him any good, in
                        > fact it
                        > > was more self-defeating than anything else. Once
                        > his stress level
                        > rose
                        > > too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By
                        > noticing it early, I
                        > > could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if
                        > this would work."
                        > By
                        > > participating in what he was doing, yet in a calm
                        > way, by opening
                        > up
                        > > other options to doing something, and by
                        > encouraging more thought,
                        > all
                        > > or some of these would, most of the time, help him
                        > avoid stress and
                        > > bring some calm to the situation. Of course I had
                        > to learn to do
                        > this
                        > > myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in
                        > the world, helped
                        > me a
                        > > great deal to create calm for myself.
                        > >
                        > > And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes--
                        > often-- we want to
                        > *find*
                        > > calm. But in some situations it just isn't there
                        > to be found.
                        > Instead
                        >
                        === message truncated ===




                        ____________________________________________________________________________________Ready for the edge of your seat?
                        Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.
                        http://tv.yahoo.com/
                      • ken
                        I d agree with Kristin: there s a lot a person can learn just from books available at libraries and writings and audio available on the internet. (We re living
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 31, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I'd agree with Kristin: there's a lot a person can learn just from books
                          available at libraries and writings and audio available on the internet.
                          (We're living in wonderful times, aren't we!)

                          I'd add that access to Itunes isn't necessary; many webites have MP3
                          (audio) files which can be played on most computers these days. If your
                          computer has a sound card, then probably at most it just needs to be
                          configured to work. If you've ever heard sounds/music/voices come out
                          of your computer, then it's already configured. Of course you'll need
                          to have either speakers or headphones hooked up. Just find an MP3 (or
                          MPU or RAM) file and click on it.

                          hth,
                          ken


                          On 08/31/2007 07:08 AM somebody named Kristin Ballantine wrote:
                          > You can most definitely grow on your own. There are
                          > many resources out there nowadays. If you have access
                          > to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
                          > Buddhist Dharma talks. Books, cd's, internet web
                          > sites. One web sited I've found that is a "directory"
                          > of resources is www.buddhanet.net.
                          > If you can ever get to a center to meet other
                          > Buddhists in your community, I highly encourage it. If
                          > not, maybe take a short week-end/retreat for
                          > yourself, go to a meditation workshop at Shambhala in
                          > Colorado- I hear it's beautiful there. Or the Kripalu
                          > Center also has Buddhist guest lecturer workshops
                          > several times a year also.
                          >
                          > Hope this helps!
                          > Kristin
                          > --- theseitzies <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >> Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It is
                          >> nice to know
                          >> that I am not missing the point....I'm just on the
                          >> journey to find
                          >> it and that if I don't give up, it will come in its
                          >> own time.
                          >>
                          >> How important do you all feel it is to be part of
                          >> a Buddhist
                          >> group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as a
                          >> Buddhist on ones
                          >> own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my
                          >> area, but I work 2nd
                          >> shift making it to attend during the week. I try to
                          >> spend any extra
                          >> time I have with my husband, because I barely see
                          >> him...so the
                          >> weekends are out as well.
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken
                          >> <gebser@...> wrote:
                          >>>
                          >>> Tracie,
                          >>>
                          >>> Welcome to this group.
                          >>>
                          >>> First I should admit that I don't consider myself
                          >> a true Buddhist
                          >>> either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this
                          >> lifetime anyway) be
                          >> a real
                          >>> Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person.
                          >> It's more that I
                          >> had
                          >>> beliefs and found that those beliefs jived pretty
                          >> good with what I
                          >>> starting hearing and reading about Buddhism. The
                          >> more Buddhism I
                          >> read,
                          >>> the more connections I found with what I already
                          >> believed.
                          >>> What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily
                          >> doctrinaire
                          >> Buddhism. But
                          >>> then I've found that Buddhism is the least
                          >> doctrinaire of any of
                          >> the
                          >>> major religions (and most minor ones) that I've
                          >> learned about.
                          >> I've
                          >>> also found that there's many ways to understand
                          >> something. So
                          >> while
                          >>> there might be another explanation to what I'll
                          >> say, I don't think
                          >> that
                          >>> what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>> A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in
                          >> Buddhism there's said
                          >> to be
                          >>> many paths up the mountain. She meant that
                          >> religions other than
                          >>> Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be.
                          >> But it's also true
                          >> just
                          >>> within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one
                          >> and the same path,
                          >> which
                          >>> all Buddhists must take. There's many paths.
                          >> Though it might not
                          >> be
                          >>> the easiest, but I believe you could even create
                          >> your own path.
                          >> Perhaps
                          >>> in the end each of us must to some degree make our
                          >> own path. So
                          >> no one
                          >>> has to worry about veering from "the path"
                          >> because, in the end, it
                          >> can
                          >>> still lead up the mountain.
                          >>>
                          >>> In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't
                          >> to say, "I'm a
                          >>> Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much
                          >> pressure, too much
                          >>> stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me to
                          >> avoid-- "avoid"
                          >> in
                          >>> the sense of dealing with life in a way that
                          >> produces no stress or
                          >>> pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying
                          >> about being a good
                          >>> Buddhist or staying on some path, might be helping
                          >> me to be a
                          >> better
                          >>> Buddhist, at least in one way.
                          >>>
                          >>> At the same time, the experience of stress and
                          >> pressure can be
                          >> helpful.
                          >>> As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes my
                          >> way." Since
                          >> he's not
                          >>> around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I believe
                          >> Lao-tse would
                          >> say,
                          >>> "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we
                          >> can learn from
                          >> it."
                          >>> What I've tried to do with stress and pressure is
                          >> to notice when
                          >> I'm
                          >>> feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*-- and
                          >> think about how
                          >> it's
                          >>> occurring, from whom or from where or from what is
                          >> it
                          >> originating. This
                          >>> does two things: one is that, merely by noticing
                          >> the stress, we
                          >> distance
                          >>> ourselves from that stress and so don't experience
                          >> it immediately--
                          >> that
                          >>> is, we experience it mediated by our contemplation
                          >> of it, sort of a
                          >>> second-hand experience of stress, almost as if
                          >> it's somebody else's
                          >>> stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress, that
                          >> pressure, may
                          >> become
                          >>> the stress and pressure of the samsara world and
                          >> only something we
                          >>> observe from afar, detached from it by our
                          >> noticing of it.
                          >>> Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we
                          >> become more
                          >> sensitive to
                          >>> it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it
                          >> sooner in its
                          >> development.
                          >>> If we notice it sooner, we have more of an
                          >> opportunity to find a
                          >> way to
                          >>> defuse a situation before it becomes too intense.
                          >> For example,
                          >> being
                          >>> around quite a few high intensity people over the
                          >> years, I noticed
                          >> that
                          >>> they would do silly things when their stress level
                          >> climbed too
                          >> high. I
                          >>> have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if
                          >> he couldn't get
                          >>> something to do what he wanted and end up smashing
                          >> it. His life
                          >> was a
                          >>> history of smashed radios, computers, cars,
                          >> motorcycles, pens,
                          >> windows,
                          >>> people, and even an airplane. None of this did
                          >> him any good, in
                          >> fact it
                          >>> was more self-defeating than anything else. Once
                          >> his stress level
                          >> rose
                          >>> too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By
                          >> noticing it early, I
                          >>> could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if
                          >> this would work."
                          >> By
                          >>> participating in what he was doing, yet in a calm
                          >> way, by opening
                          >> up
                          >>> other options to doing something, and by
                          >> encouraging more thought,
                          >> all
                          >>> or some of these would, most of the time, help him
                          >> avoid stress and
                          >>> bring some calm to the situation. Of course I had
                          >> to learn to do
                          >> this
                          >>> myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in
                          >> the world, helped
                          >> me a
                          >>> great deal to create calm for myself.
                          >>>
                          >>> And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes--
                          >> often-- we want to
                          >> *find*
                          >>> calm. But in some situations it just isn't there
                          >> to be found.
                          >> Instead


                          --
                          Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like Just-Hold-It potty training.
                        • Ken/
                          Hello, and welcome to all of the new members. As you see, there are two Kens here. I, being the elder, use a capitol K, and ken, being the smarter and more
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 1, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hello, and welcome to all of the new members. As you
                            see, there are two Kens here. I, being the elder, use
                            a capitol K, and ken, being the smarter and more
                            humble, uses a small k.
                            I was a member of a tibetan sanga for several years
                            (Drikung Kaygu) and must say that having a bona fide
                            teacher is extremely important, and the companionship
                            of a close sangha helps a lot in your path.
                            If it is at all possible, find a sangha and call them
                            about beginner's classes. You will be surprised at how
                            accomodating they will be. Or, just drop in, most have
                            a websites that detail many of their offerings and
                            times.
                            Technically, to become a "Buddhist", it is required
                            that you take refuge in the three jewels(The Buddha,
                            the Dharma, and the Sangha). This can be done
                            privately within yourself, but is more enjoyable, in a
                            ceremony at a temple or center, headed by a qualified
                            Lama or teacher.

                            Hope that helps a little,
                            Ken/


                            --- ken <gebser@...> wrote:

                            >
                            > I'd agree with Kristin: there's a lot a person can
                            > learn just from books
                            > available at libraries and writings and audio
                            > available on the internet.
                            > (We're living in wonderful times, aren't we!)
                            >
                            > I'd add that access to Itunes isn't necessary; many
                            > webites have MP3
                            > (audio) files which can be played on most computers
                            > these days. If your
                            > computer has a sound card, then probably at most it
                            > just needs to be
                            > configured to work. If you've ever heard
                            > sounds/music/voices come out
                            > of your computer, then it's already configured. Of
                            > course you'll need
                            > to have either speakers or headphones hooked up.
                            > Just find an MP3 (or
                            > MPU or RAM) file and click on it.
                            >
                            > hth,
                            > ken
                            >
                            >
                            > On 08/31/2007 07:08 AM somebody named Kristin
                            > Ballantine wrote:
                            > > You can most definitely grow on your own. There
                            > are
                            > > many resources out there nowadays. If you have
                            > access
                            > > to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
                            > > Buddhist Dharma talks. Books, cd's, internet web
                            > > sites. One web sited I've found that is a
                            > "directory"
                            > > of resources is www.buddhanet.net.
                            > > If you can ever get to a center to meet other
                            > > Buddhists in your community, I highly encourage
                            > it. If
                            > > not, maybe take a short week-end/retreat for
                            > > yourself, go to a meditation workshop at Shambhala
                            > in
                            > > Colorado- I hear it's beautiful there. Or the
                            > Kripalu
                            > > Center also has Buddhist guest lecturer workshops
                            > > several times a year also.
                            > >
                            > > Hope this helps!
                            > > Kristin
                            > > --- theseitzies <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > >> Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It
                            > is
                            > >> nice to know
                            > >> that I am not missing the point....I'm just on
                            > the
                            > >> journey to find
                            > >> it and that if I don't give up, it will come in
                            > its
                            > >> own time.
                            > >>
                            > >> How important do you all feel it is to be part
                            > of
                            > >> a Buddhist
                            > >> group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as
                            > a
                            > >> Buddhist on ones
                            > >> own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my
                            > >> area, but I work 2nd
                            > >> shift making it to attend during the week. I try
                            > to
                            > >> spend any extra
                            > >> time I have with my husband, because I barely see
                            > >> him...so the
                            > >> weekends are out as well.
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken
                            > >> <gebser@...> wrote:
                            > >>>
                            > >>> Tracie,
                            > >>>
                            > >>> Welcome to this group.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> First I should admit that I don't consider
                            > myself
                            > >> a true Buddhist
                            > >>> either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this
                            > >> lifetime anyway) be
                            > >> a real
                            > >>> Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person.
                            > >> It's more that I
                            > >> had
                            > >>> beliefs and found that those beliefs jived
                            > pretty
                            > >> good with what I
                            > >>> starting hearing and reading about Buddhism.
                            > The
                            > >> more Buddhism I
                            > >> read,
                            > >>> the more connections I found with what I already
                            > >> believed.
                            > >>> What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily
                            > >> doctrinaire
                            > >> Buddhism. But
                            > >>> then I've found that Buddhism is the least
                            > >> doctrinaire of any of
                            > >> the
                            > >>> major religions (and most minor ones) that I've
                            > >> learned about.
                            > >> I've
                            > >>> also found that there's many ways to understand
                            > >> something. So
                            > >> while
                            > >>> there might be another explanation to what I'll
                            > >> say, I don't think
                            > >> that
                            > >>> what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
                            > >>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>> A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in
                            > >> Buddhism there's said
                            > >> to be
                            > >>> many paths up the mountain. She meant that
                            > >> religions other than
                            > >>> Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be.
                            > >> But it's also true
                            > >> just
                            > >>> within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one
                            > >> and the same path,
                            > >> which
                            > >>> all Buddhists must take. There's many paths.
                            > >> Though it might not
                            > >> be
                            > >>> the easiest, but I believe you could even create
                            > >> your own path.
                            > >> Perhaps
                            > >>> in the end each of us must to some degree make
                            > our
                            > >> own path. So
                            > >> no one
                            > >>> has to worry about veering from "the path"
                            > >> because, in the end, it
                            > >> can
                            > >>> still lead up the mountain.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't
                            > >> to say, "I'm a
                            > >>> Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much
                            > >> pressure, too much
                            > >>> stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me
                            > to
                            > >> avoid-- "avoid"
                            > >> in
                            > >>> the sense of dealing with life in a way that
                            > >> produces no stress or
                            > >>> pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying
                            > >> about being a good
                            > >>> Buddhist or staying on some path, might be
                            > helping
                            > >> me to be a
                            > >> better
                            > >>> Buddhist, at least in one way.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> At the same time, the experience of stress and
                            > >> pressure can be
                            > >> helpful.
                            > >>> As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes
                            > my
                            > >> way." Since
                            > >> he's not
                            > >>> around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I
                            > believe
                            > >> Lao-tse would
                            > >> say,
                            > >>> "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we
                            > >> can learn from
                            > >> it."
                            > >>> What I've tried to do with stress and pressure
                            > is
                            > >> to notice when
                            > >> I'm
                            > >>> feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*--
                            > and
                            > >> think about how
                            > >> it's
                            > >>> occurring, from whom or from where or from what
                            > is
                            > >> it
                            > >> originating. This
                            > >>> does two things: one is that, merely by noticing
                            > >> the stress, we
                            > >> distance
                            > >>> ourselves from that stress and so don't
                            > experience
                            > >> it immediately--
                            > >> that
                            > >>> is, we experience it mediated by our
                            > contemplation
                            > >> of it, sort of a
                            > >>> second-hand experience of stress, almost as if
                            > >> it's somebody else's
                            > >>> stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress,
                            > that
                            > >> pressure, may
                            > >> become
                            > >>> the stress and pressure of the samsara world and
                            > >> only something we
                            > >>> observe from afar, detached from it by our
                            > >> noticing of it.
                            > >>> Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we
                            > >> become more
                            > >> sensitive to
                            > >>> it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it
                            > >> sooner in its
                            > >> development.
                            > >>> If we notice it sooner, we have more of an
                            > >> opportunity to find a
                            > >> way to
                            > >>> defuse a situation before it becomes too
                            > intense.
                            > >> For example,
                            > >> being
                            > >>> around quite a few high intensity people over
                            > the
                            > >> years, I noticed
                            > >> that
                            > >>> they would do silly things when their stress
                            > level
                            > >> climbed too
                            > >> high. I
                            > >>> have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if
                            > >> he couldn't get
                            > >>> something to do what he wanted and end up
                            > smashing
                            > >> it. His life
                            > >> was a
                            > >>> history of smashed radios, computers, cars,
                            > >> motorcycles, pens,
                            > >> windows,
                            > >>> people, and even an airplane. None of this did
                            > >> him any good, in
                            > >> fact it
                            > >>> was more self-defeating than anything else.
                            > Once
                            > >> his stress level
                            > >> rose
                            > >>> too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By
                            > >> noticing it early, I
                            > >>> could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if
                            > >> this would work."
                            > >> By
                            > >>> participating in what he was doing, yet in a
                            > calm
                            > >> way, by opening
                            > >> up
                            > >>> other options to doing something, and by
                            > >> encouraging more thought,
                            > >> all
                            > >>> or some of these would, most of the time, help
                            > him
                            > >> avoid stress and
                            > >>> bring some calm to the situation. Of course I
                            > had
                            > >> to learn to do
                            > >> this
                            > >>> myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in
                            > >> the world, helped
                            > >> me a
                            > >>> great deal to create calm for myself.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes--
                            > >> often-- we want to
                            > >> *find*
                            > >>> calm. But in some situations it just isn't
                            > there
                            > >> to be found.
                            > >> Instead
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like
                            > Just-Hold-It potty training.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >




                            ____________________________________________________________________________________Ready for the edge of your seat?
                            Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.
                            http://tv.yahoo.com/
                          • Thubten
                            Thank you Ken. I am newly subscribed because I got so tired of the Usenet groups with sniping and fighting, etc. My name is Victoria and I took refuge with
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 1, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Thank you Ken. I am newly subscribed because I got so tired of the Usenet
                              groups with sniping and fighting, etc. My name is Victoria and I took
                              refuge with Ven. Robina Courtin at Land of Medicine Buddha in 2004. Before
                              that, I did a lot of reading. Reading is nothing without the oral
                              transmission, in my opinion. Refuge, retreat and a Lama are vital to me for
                              practice. Lama Zopa Rinpoche is my Root Guru.

                              My first empowerment was Medicine Buddha. Not high tantra, but the Tulku
                              who gave me the initiation stressed that we love our books in America!
                              Nothing wrong with them, but stressed how vital it is to have a qualified
                              Lama, who holds their particular lineage. I study in the Gelug.

                              I look forward to having interesting discussion here.

                              warm regards,
                              Victoria


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Ken/" <klegshe@...>
                              To: <Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2007 10:44 AM
                              Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: Path and World


                              > Hello, and welcome to all of the new members. As you
                              > see, there are two Kens here. I, being the elder, use
                              > a capitol K, and ken, being the smarter and more
                              > humble, uses a small k.
                              > I was a member of a tibetan sanga for several years
                              > (Drikung Kaygu) and must say that having a bona fide
                              > teacher is extremely important, and the companionship
                              > of a close sangha helps a lot in your path.
                              > If it is at all possible, find a sangha and call them
                              > about beginner's classes. You will be surprised at how
                              > accomodating they will be. Or, just drop in, most have
                              > a websites that detail many of their offerings and
                              > times.
                              > Technically, to become a "Buddhist", it is required
                              > that you take refuge in the three jewels(The Buddha,
                              > the Dharma, and the Sangha). This can be done
                              > privately within yourself, but is more enjoyable, in a
                              > ceremony at a temple or center, headed by a qualified
                              > Lama or teacher.
                              >
                              > Hope that helps a little,
                              > Ken/
                              >
                              >
                              > --- ken <gebser@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >>
                              >> I'd agree with Kristin: there's a lot a person can
                              >> learn just from books
                              >> available at libraries and writings and audio
                              >> available on the internet.
                              >> (We're living in wonderful times, aren't we!)
                              >>
                              >> I'd add that access to Itunes isn't necessary; many
                              >> webites have MP3
                              >> (audio) files which can be played on most computers
                              >> these days. If your
                              >> computer has a sound card, then probably at most it
                              >> just needs to be
                              >> configured to work. If you've ever heard
                              >> sounds/music/voices come out
                              >> of your computer, then it's already configured. Of
                              >> course you'll need
                              >> to have either speakers or headphones hooked up.
                              >> Just find an MP3 (or
                              >> MPU or RAM) file and click on it.
                              >>
                              >> hth,
                              >> ken
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> On 08/31/2007 07:08 AM somebody named Kristin
                              >> Ballantine wrote:
                              >> > You can most definitely grow on your own. There
                              >> are
                              >> > many resources out there nowadays. If you have
                              >> access
                              >> > to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
                              >> > Buddhist Dharma talks. Books, cd's, internet web
                              >> > sites. One web sited I've found that is a
                              >> "directory"
                              >> > of resources is www.buddhanet.net.
                              >> > If you can ever get to a center to meet other
                              >> > Buddhists in your community, I highly encourage
                              >> it. If
                              >> > not, maybe take a short week-end/retreat for
                              >> > yourself, go to a meditation workshop at Shambhala
                              >> in
                              >> > Colorado- I hear it's beautiful there. Or the
                              >> Kripalu
                              >> > Center also has Buddhist guest lecturer workshops
                              >> > several times a year also.
                              >> >
                              >> > Hope this helps!
                              >> > Kristin
                              >> > --- theseitzies <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
                              >> >
                              >> >> Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It
                              >> is
                              >> >> nice to know
                              >> >> that I am not missing the point....I'm just on
                              >> the
                              >> >> journey to find
                              >> >> it and that if I don't give up, it will come in
                              >> its
                              >> >> own time.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> How important do you all feel it is to be part
                              >> of
                              >> >> a Buddhist
                              >> >> group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as
                              >> a
                              >> >> Buddhist on ones
                              >> >> own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my
                              >> >> area, but I work 2nd
                              >> >> shift making it to attend during the week. I try
                              >> to
                              >> >> spend any extra
                              >> >> time I have with my husband, because I barely see
                              >> >> him...so the
                              >> >> weekends are out as well.
                              >> >>
                              >> >>
                              >> >> --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken
                              >> >> <gebser@...> wrote:
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> Tracie,
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> Welcome to this group.
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> First I should admit that I don't consider
                              >> myself
                              >> >> a true Buddhist
                              >> >>> either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this
                              >> >> lifetime anyway) be
                              >> >> a real
                              >> >>> Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person.
                              >> >> It's more that I
                              >> >> had
                              >> >>> beliefs and found that those beliefs jived
                              >> pretty
                              >> >> good with what I
                              >> >>> starting hearing and reading about Buddhism.
                              >> The
                              >> >> more Buddhism I
                              >> >> read,
                              >> >>> the more connections I found with what I already
                              >> >> believed.
                              >> >>> What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily
                              >> >> doctrinaire
                              >> >> Buddhism. But
                              >> >>> then I've found that Buddhism is the least
                              >> >> doctrinaire of any of
                              >> >> the
                              >> >>> major religions (and most minor ones) that I've
                              >> >> learned about.
                              >> >> I've
                              >> >>> also found that there's many ways to understand
                              >> >> something. So
                              >> >> while
                              >> >>> there might be another explanation to what I'll
                              >> >> say, I don't think
                              >> >> that
                              >> >>> what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in
                              >> >> Buddhism there's said
                              >> >> to be
                              >> >>> many paths up the mountain. She meant that
                              >> >> religions other than
                              >> >>> Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be.
                              >> >> But it's also true
                              >> >> just
                              >> >>> within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one
                              >> >> and the same path,
                              >> >> which
                              >> >>> all Buddhists must take. There's many paths.
                              >> >> Though it might not
                              >> >> be
                              >> >>> the easiest, but I believe you could even create
                              >> >> your own path.
                              >> >> Perhaps
                              >> >>> in the end each of us must to some degree make
                              >> our
                              >> >> own path. So
                              >> >> no one
                              >> >>> has to worry about veering from "the path"
                              >> >> because, in the end, it
                              >> >> can
                              >> >>> still lead up the mountain.
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't
                              >> >> to say, "I'm a
                              >> >>> Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much
                              >> >> pressure, too much
                              >> >>> stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me
                              >> to
                              >> >> avoid-- "avoid"
                              >> >> in
                              >> >>> the sense of dealing with life in a way that
                              >> >> produces no stress or
                              >> >>> pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying
                              >> >> about being a good
                              >> >>> Buddhist or staying on some path, might be
                              >> helping
                              >> >> me to be a
                              >> >> better
                              >> >>> Buddhist, at least in one way.
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> At the same time, the experience of stress and
                              >> >> pressure can be
                              >> >> helpful.
                              >> >>> As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes
                              >> my
                              >> >> way." Since
                              >> >> he's not
                              >> >>> around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I
                              >> believe
                              >> >> Lao-tse would
                              >> >> say,
                              >> >>> "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we
                              >> >> can learn from
                              >> >> it."
                              >> >>> What I've tried to do with stress and pressure
                              >> is
                              >> >> to notice when
                              >> >> I'm
                              >> >>> feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*--
                              >> and
                              >> >> think about how
                              >> >> it's
                              >> >>> occurring, from whom or from where or from what
                              >> is
                              >> >> it
                              >> >> originating. This
                              >> >>> does two things: one is that, merely by noticing
                              >> >> the stress, we
                              >> >> distance
                              >> >>> ourselves from that stress and so don't
                              >> experience
                              >> >> it immediately--
                              >> >> that
                              >> >>> is, we experience it mediated by our
                              >> contemplation
                              >> >> of it, sort of a
                              >> >>> second-hand experience of stress, almost as if
                              >> >> it's somebody else's
                              >> >>> stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress,
                              >> that
                              >> >> pressure, may
                              >> >> become
                              >> >>> the stress and pressure of the samsara world and
                              >> >> only something we
                              >> >>> observe from afar, detached from it by our
                              >> >> noticing of it.
                              >> >>> Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we
                              >> >> become more
                              >> >> sensitive to
                              >> >>> it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it
                              >> >> sooner in its
                              >> >> development.
                              >> >>> If we notice it sooner, we have more of an
                              >> >> opportunity to find a
                              >> >> way to
                              >> >>> defuse a situation before it becomes too
                              >> intense.
                              >> >> For example,
                              >> >> being
                              >> >>> around quite a few high intensity people over
                              >> the
                              >> >> years, I noticed
                              >> >> that
                              >> >>> they would do silly things when their stress
                              >> level
                              >> >> climbed too
                              >> >> high. I
                              >> >>> have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if
                              >> >> he couldn't get
                              >> >>> something to do what he wanted and end up
                              >> smashing
                              >> >> it. His life
                              >> >> was a
                              >> >>> history of smashed radios, computers, cars,
                              >> >> motorcycles, pens,
                              >> >> windows,
                              >> >>> people, and even an airplane. None of this did
                              >> >> him any good, in
                              >> >> fact it
                              >> >>> was more self-defeating than anything else.
                              >> Once
                              >> >> his stress level
                              >> >> rose
                              >> >>> too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By
                              >> >> noticing it early, I
                              >> >>> could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if
                              >> >> this would work."
                              >> >> By
                              >> >>> participating in what he was doing, yet in a
                              >> calm
                              >> >> way, by opening
                              >> >> up
                              >> >>> other options to doing something, and by
                              >> >> encouraging more thought,
                              >> >> all
                              >> >>> or some of these would, most of the time, help
                              >> him
                              >> >> avoid stress and
                              >> >>> bring some calm to the situation. Of course I
                              >> had
                              >> >> to learn to do
                              >> >> this
                              >> >>> myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in
                              >> >> the world, helped
                              >> >> me a
                              >> >>> great deal to create calm for myself.
                              >> >>>
                              >> >>> And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes--
                              >> >> often-- we want to
                              >> >> *find*
                              >> >>> calm. But in some situations it just isn't
                              >> there
                              >> >> to be found.
                              >> >> Instead
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> --
                              >> Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like
                              >> Just-Hold-It potty training.
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ____________________________________________________________________________________Ready
                              > for the edge of your seat?
                              > Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.
                              > http://tv.yahoo.com/
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > --
                              > No virus found in this incoming message.
                              > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                              > Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.1/982 - Release Date: 8/31/2007
                              > 5:21 PM
                              >
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.