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  • Lauren Merryfield
    Hi, Since I m on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one. A lot of people say God doesn t give you more than you can handle. I started out very
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 14, 2007
      Hi,
      Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.

      A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can handle." I started out very young with scary stuff and I've never totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious person. I think I had more than I could handle at a very tender age with no chance to develop a safe place to be.

      Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things that could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with my kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me not to get out more.

      What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can handle?
      thanks
      Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.
      For excellent hosting check out:
      http://www.goldbar.net/ua/link.php?affID=bizcats_host
      "In every person who comes near you look for what is good and strong;
      honor that; try to imitate it, and your faults will drop off like
      dead leaves when their time comes."
      -- John Ruskin (1819-1900) English Art Critic
      Nature abhors a vacuum, but not as much as cats do." - Lee Entrekin
      CATLINES has moved to a blog at:
      http://bizcats.blogs.com/catlines/
      sign up for CATLINES and more:
      http://www.catliness.com



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • james staples
      ... handle. I started out very young with scary stuff and I ve never totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious person. I think I had more than
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
        --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "Lauren Merryfield"
        <lauren1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        > Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.
        >
        > A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can
        handle." I started out very young with scary stuff and I've never
        totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious person. I
        think I had more than I could handle at a very tender age with no
        chance to develop a safe place to be.

        <<< for some people, it seems to be so. However, i for one have
        been constantly barraged, from the youngest age. However, i have
        a very Hard as stone streak, which can make me very inflexible;
        and 'Diety' has needed to bust me down grind me to powder mix in
        some of whatever to create some softeness and pliability. usually i
        sceam all the way... then after restentfully wondering, 'what was
        that for', an event comes along which takes a flexible and pliable
        person to deal with. Have you read any Chogyam Trungpa? In his
        books Training the mind and Shambala, i found out i really needed
        this. i can be cold and icy... due to a pretty hideous childhood.
        The constant heat and pressure though a drag, makes the Taoist
        Water concept useful and purposeful, at least for me. The
        following may be silly, but, sometimes, too much to handle can
        come in differant forms.

        A rich man came to visit Solomon and do business with him for some
        time, as he was about to leave the King summoned him and said;
        "Surely you will not leave without leaving me some bit of wisdom to
        ponder." The man was stunned. "O King " he said "you are known
        to be the wisest man in all the world, what could i ever offer
        you?!"
        But the king pressed him again, and a third time until finally
        the man gave way.
        "O King" he said, "When all is going against you, your kingdom
        is falling around you, and all those you love hate you and there is
        darkness 'ere you look. Retire to your secret place fall to your
        knees and say, "Thank you G-d whe this shall pass".
        "And then, O king, when all is going for you, your kingdom rises
        around you in power and great glory your enemies flee before you,
        throngs love and adore you and light and glory are yours, retire to
        your secret palce, fall to your kness and say, "Thank you G-d,
        when this too will pass".

        It is hard, but there is something in it.





        >
        > Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things that
        could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with my
        kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me not to
        get out more.

        <<< wow, sounds like i am talking to myself. my kitties and
        doggies , well, they are always there for me, i am happier when i
        am there for them. i hate leaving my 30 acres. Seems when i do
        there is surely a cop to pull me over, to check me out; and then
        justify it with a ticket. Even when someone else is driving it is
        not unusual, thanks to someone who Blessed me with being put on
        some sort of watch list, 11 years ago. Even when i am just walking
        down the street they are nice enough to stop me and give me a ride
        to where ever i may be going, but other than a ticket, i have
        never committed any crime. Thankfully things are tapering off, but
        i have an owls neck now when i pass a cop. They are probably just
        Protecting and Serving me.






        >
        > What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can
        handle?

        <<<Of this i would be of little use for an answer, however i may
        offer this to ponder abit. It really helps me stem my victim streak.

        > the most excellant practice is patience and forebearance...
        >Happy indeed we live without hate amoung hateful men. We live free
        from hate amidst hateful men.
        >By degrees, little by little, from moment to moment, a wise
        (person) removes his own impurites, as a smith removes the dross of
        silver.
        {i take fear to be an impurity... which requires exposure to
        heat, pounding (ouch!) and further heat to bring out Our Silver).

        > Free thyself from the past, free thyself from the future, free
        thyself from the present. Crossing to the farther shore of
        exsistance, with mind released everywhere, no more shalt thou come
        to birth and decay.

        > All conditioned things are impermanent, when one sees this in
        wisdom, then one becomes dispassionate toward the painful. This is
        the path to purity.

        ( our past 'conditions' us, with our fears, our
        future 'conditions' us, with our hopes,
        our present 'conditions' us to dwell on both;
        distracting us from our efforts to become pliable and unconditioned)


        i spose i could go on, but theese, minus the (), are from the
        Dhammapada, which has been a great help to me.




        > thanks
        > Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.

        <<< Namaste'
        james


        > For excellent hosting check out:
        > http://www.goldbar.net/ua/link.php?affID=bizcats_host
        > "In every person who comes near you look for what is good and
        strong;
        > honor that; try to imitate it, and your faults will drop off like
        > dead leaves when their time comes."
        > -- John Ruskin (1819-1900) English Art Critic
        > Nature abhors a vacuum, but not as much as cats do." - Lee Entrekin
        > CATLINES has moved to a blog at:
        > http://bizcats.blogs.com/catlines/
        > sign up for CATLINES and more:
        > http://www.catliness.com
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • John Pellecchia
        Dear Lauren, I hope the following article is of some help to you. All of the following words are those of the author. May all be at peace. John Coping with
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
          Dear Lauren,

          I hope the following article is of some help to you. All of the
          following words are those of the author.

          May all be at peace.

          John


          Coping with Fear
          More Body, Mind & Spirit Solutions

          By Cait Johnson, author of Earth, Water, Fire, and Air: Essential Ways
          of Connecting to Spirit (SkyLight Paths, 2003).


          I did some research and found some comforting words of great wisdom
          from a Tibetan Buddhist lama, a Zen Buddhist teacher, and a Mohican
          chief. There is also information here about the Hindu goddess who
          dispels fear, the attitude of many shamans towards it, and a few
          Earth-based methods for coping with it.

          How have some of the world's great spiritual paths dealt with the
          problem of fear? Find out, here:

          "The presence of fear means only that fear is present, and nothing
          more," says Zen Buddhist teacher Suzanne Segal. Fear is only a problem
          when it causes inaction, when it paralyzes. If we can take action, we
          may be feeling unpleasant sensations, but that doesn't make it fear.

          In traditional Buddhism, practices such as meditation and breath-work
          have been used to calm fear. Buddhists also believe that meditating on
          the concept of impermanence and death will help alleviate it, and that
          only by eliminating the notion of a Self can fear be conquered.

          In response to the September 11 terror attacks, Tibetan lama Kilung
          Tulku Tsultrim Rinpoche identified four actions that we can take to
          ease fear:

          Pray.
          Wake up (stay conscious about what it happening).
          Become aware of what is important. See where there might be benefit.
          Speak out, if there is an issue that needs to be addressed.

          Tibetan Buddhism also teaches that visualizing an image of the Divine
          can help to ease fear.

          Hindus have a Goddess of Fear: Kali, whose devotees are freed from
          fear through facing her difficult truths. Hindus find relief from fear
          by praying to Kali, making offerings to her, and accepting her lessons
          about the inevitability of death: they believe that by naming and
          witnessing our fears, we are able to walk thorough them.

          Many shamanic traditions include teachings around fear. As Carlos
          Casteneda says in The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge,
          "The first enemy of a man of knowledge is Fear. A terrible
          enemy--treacherous, and difficult to overcome. It remains concealed at
          every turn of the way, prowling, waiting. And if the man, terrified in
          its presence, runs away, his enemy will have put an end to his quest.
          Once a man has vanquished fear, he is free from it for the rest of his
          life because, instead of fear, he has acquired clarity of mind which
          erases fear."

          Many shamanic initiations include experiences of death and
          dismemberment: once you have gone through your own death and somehow
          survived it, the fear of dying loses its potency.

          Some indigenous people have lost their fear because they see death as
          a going-home to the great Mother. As the Mohican Chief Aupumut said in
          1725, "When it comes time to die, be not like those whose hearts are
          filled with the fear of death, so when their time comes they weep and
          pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a
          different way. Sing your death song, and die like a hero going home."

          Many native peoples teach that ritual actions such as purification and
          other ceremonies, vision quests, the making of talismans, asking for
          help from animal and other helping allies, and the singing or chanting
          of certain songs or prayers are all helpful ways to deal with fear.

          Words have been used throughout history and across the world to
          alleviate fear, as well. It can be helpful to find a poem or prayer
          that soothes and calms you and read it, either aloud or silently to
          yourself, whenever you have need.

          It may also be good to remember that both gratitude and compassion
          help to displace fear.


          --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "Lauren Merryfield" <lauren1@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi,
          > Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.
          >
          > A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can handle."
          I started out very young with scary stuff and I've never totally
          adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious person. I think I had
          more than I could handle at a very tender age with no chance to
          develop a safe place to be.
          >
          > Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things that
          could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with my
          kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me not to
          get out more.
          >
          > What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can handle?
          > thanks
          > Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.
        • Joe Marshall
          Hi, Lauren. I am most familiar with that saying, having it been offered me during hard times and what not. I used to think of it as one of those pat answers
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 15, 2007
            Hi, Lauren.

            I am most familiar with that saying, having it been offered me during hard
            times and what not. I used to think of it as one of those pat answers from
            people who didn't know what they were talking about and/or didn't know what
            else to say, but I have come to realize that the saying is true. It is only
            our perspective that makes that proverb seem so ridiculous. Let me explain.

            I once suffered from terrible psychological problems, not the least of which
            was an inclination toward suicide, and even had to be brought back from
            clinically dead once. You know, tortured childhood, all that. Anyway, when
            I used to hear that sentence about not getting more than I can handle, I
            used to get VERY angry; but the deal was that I was selling myself short on
            what I could handle and exactly what divinity was doing. Yes, god, the
            world, whatever, does push the limits of what we can handle, but whatever
            the divine intelligence is, shouldn't he be pushing our limits? How else
            are we to grow? Horrid things happen. That is just how things are down
            here - we can't change that, but regardless our mission in these lifetimes
            is to transcend what is going on around us so that we get to a place where
            we deal with them, but we do not get shaken up by them. That is the point
            of Buddhism, to ultimately achieve a state of consciousness where you are
            not aloof, but not attached; and in that state you can engage a problem
            without the pain or confusion or any breach of your peace. The Daili Lama
            has attained such a state, and if you ever see him interviewed about current
            events and such, you will notice that while he speaks of a grave problem,
            his government in exile and his people living under the tyranny of the
            communist Chinese occupation - a very serious matter of which he is the
            deposed leader, at the same time he is still joyous and does much smiling
            and laughing. He is not goofy or nuts or laughing about the situation, but
            he lives his life in joy; all things being far from ideal has not shaken him
            out of his bliss, nor will it. He is a bodhisattva, and that is what we are
            aspiring to be; and one will notice that even practicing as little as 30
            minutes of meditation every day dramatically alters ones perspective, lowers
            anxiety like you would not believe (24/7), and gives one much more clarity
            of thought. This happened for me, and all I did was sit up, enjoy my slow
            deep breathing, and allowed my mind to quiet.

            Those 30 minutes stacked up and carried me through entire days, helped me
            see things differently, and put me on a path to bigger and better things.
            That isn't the only thing to do, but it was where my priestess started me.
            The grueling pain before, and even after, served a priceless purpose; and
            that was to motivate me to action - to put me on a path to true spiritual
            growth, to DO something that would start me in the right direction and begin
            raising my consciousness. Here's the thing though. It wasn't enough for me
            to study. I'm fairly bright, so I always thought I could rationalize
            everything and get something out of the intellectual exercise, but in this
            it doesn't work. It will serve as a valuable back-up, but no one's life has
            ever changed, to my knowledge, until they took action, sustained and wise
            action. Just as simple as asking someone far more learned than I was where
            to begin and giving it an honest go. I had nothing to lose but grueling
            pain and confusion, but treasure beyond my wildest dreams to gain. I
            figured that if I tried meditating for awhile and didn't like it, my misery
            was waiting for me, should I choose to go back to it.


            Aum Shanti,
            ~Joe






            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Lauren Merryfield
            > Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 1:19 AM
            > To: buddhism 101
            > Subject: [Buddhism_101] another question
            >
            >
            > Hi,
            > Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.
            >
            > A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can
            > handle." I started out very young with scary stuff and I've
            > never totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious
            > person. I think I had more than I could handle at a very tender
            > age with no chance to develop a safe place to be.
            >
            > Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things
            > that could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with
            > my kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me
            > not to get out more.
            >
            > What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can handle?
            > thanks
            > Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.
          • steve.ensley@sealedair.com
            Joe, very well said. I really got a lot out of what you said. Meditating will change your life for the better. Peace, Steven Joe Marshall
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 16, 2007
              Joe, very well said. I really got a lot out of what you said. Meditating
              will change your life for the better.

              Peace,
              Steven



              "Joe Marshall"
              <joebliss@....
              com> To
              Sent by: <Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com>
              Buddhism_101@yaho cc
              ogroups.com
              Subject
              RE: [Buddhism_101] another question
              02/15/2007 08:11
              PM


              Please respond to
              Buddhism_101@yaho
              ogroups.com






              Hi, Lauren.

              I am most familiar with that saying, having it been offered me during hard
              times and what not. I used to think of it as one of those pat answers from
              people who didn't know what they were talking about and/or didn't know what
              else to say, but I have come to realize that the saying is true. It is only
              our perspective that makes that proverb seem so ridiculous. Let me explain.

              I once suffered from terrible psychological problems, not the least of
              which
              was an inclination toward suicide, and even had to be brought back from
              clinically dead once. You know, tortured childhood, all that. Anyway, when
              I used to hear that sentence about not getting more than I can handle, I
              used to get VERY angry; but the deal was that I was selling myself short on
              what I could handle and exactly what divinity was doing. Yes, god, the
              world, whatever, does push the limits of what we can handle, but whatever
              the divine intelligence is, shouldn't he be pushing our limits? How else
              are we to grow? Horrid things happen. That is just how things are down
              here - we can't change that, but regardless our mission in these lifetimes
              is to transcend what is going on around us so that we get to a place where
              we deal with them, but we do not get shaken up by them. That is the point
              of Buddhism, to ultimately achieve a state of consciousness where you are
              not aloof, but not attached; and in that state you can engage a problem
              without the pain or confusion or any breach of your peace. The Daili Lama
              has attained such a state, and if you ever see him interviewed about
              current
              events and such, you will notice that while he speaks of a grave problem,
              his government in exile and his people living under the tyranny of the
              communist Chinese occupation - a very serious matter of which he is the
              deposed leader, at the same time he is still joyous and does much smiling
              and laughing. He is not goofy or nuts or laughing about the situation, but
              he lives his life in joy; all things being far from ideal has not shaken
              him
              out of his bliss, nor will it. He is a bodhisattva, and that is what we are
              aspiring to be; and one will notice that even practicing as little as 30
              minutes of meditation every day dramatically alters ones perspective,
              lowers
              anxiety like you would not believe (24/7), and gives one much more clarity
              of thought. This happened for me, and all I did was sit up, enjoy my slow
              deep breathing, and allowed my mind to quiet.

              Those 30 minutes stacked up and carried me through entire days, helped me
              see things differently, and put me on a path to bigger and better things.
              That isn't the only thing to do, but it was where my priestess started me.
              The grueling pain before, and even after, served a priceless purpose; and
              that was to motivate me to action - to put me on a path to true spiritual
              growth, to DO something that would start me in the right direction and
              begin
              raising my consciousness. Here's the thing though. It wasn't enough for me
              to study. I'm fairly bright, so I always thought I could rationalize
              everything and get something out of the intellectual exercise, but in this
              it doesn't work. It will serve as a valuable back-up, but no one's life has
              ever changed, to my knowledge, until they took action, sustained and wise
              action. Just as simple as asking someone far more learned than I was where
              to begin and giving it an honest go. I had nothing to lose but grueling
              pain and confusion, but treasure beyond my wildest dreams to gain. I
              figured that if I tried meditating for awhile and didn't like it, my misery
              was waiting for me, should I choose to go back to it.

              Aum Shanti,
              ~Joe

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Lauren Merryfield
              > Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 1:19 AM
              > To: buddhism 101
              > Subject: [Buddhism_101] another question
              >
              >
              > Hi,
              > Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.
              >
              > A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can
              > handle." I started out very young with scary stuff and I've
              > never totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious
              > person. I think I had more than I could handle at a very tender
              > age with no chance to develop a safe place to be.
              >
              > Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things
              > that could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with
              > my kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me
              > not to get out more.
              >
              > What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can handle?
              > thanks
              > Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • dwain dolan
              verily... yes, indeed! thank you many times over. -dwain Self-Esteem, n. An erroneous appraisement. -Ambrose Bierce ... From: Joe Marshall
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 16, 2007
                verily...
                yes, indeed!
                thank you many times over.
                -dwain


                Self-Esteem, n. An erroneous appraisement.
                -Ambrose Bierce



                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Joe Marshall <joebliss@...>
                To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 5:11:40 PM
                Subject: RE: [Buddhism_101] another question

                Hi, Lauren.

                I am most familiar with that saying, having it been offered me during hard
                times and what not. I used to think of it as one of those pat answers from
                people who didn't know what they were talking about and/or didn't know what
                else to say, but I have come to realize that the saying is true. It is only
                our perspective that makes that proverb seem so ridiculous. Let me explain.

                I once suffered from terrible psychological problems, not the least of which
                was an inclination toward suicide, and even had to be brought back from
                clinically dead once. You know, tortured childhood, all that. Anyway, when
                I used to hear that sentence about not getting more than I can handle, I
                used to get VERY angry; but the deal was that I was selling myself short on
                what I could handle and exactly what divinity was doing. Yes, god, the
                world, whatever, does push the limits of what we can handle, but whatever
                the divine intelligence is, shouldn't he be pushing our limits? How else
                are we to grow? Horrid things happen. That is just how things are down
                here - we can't change that, but regardless our mission in these lifetimes
                is to transcend what is going on around us so that we get to a place where
                we deal with them, but we do not get shaken up by them. That is the point
                of Buddhism, to ultimately achieve a state of consciousness where you are
                not aloof, but not attached; and in that state you can engage a problem
                without the pain or confusion or any breach of your peace. The Daili Lama
                has attained such a state, and if you ever see him interviewed about current
                events and such, you will notice that while he speaks of a grave problem,
                his government in exile and his people living under the tyranny of the
                communist Chinese occupation - a very serious matter of which he is the
                deposed leader, at the same time he is still joyous and does much smiling
                and laughing. He is not goofy or nuts or laughing about the situation, but
                he lives his life in joy; all things being far from ideal has not shaken him
                out of his bliss, nor will it. He is a bodhisattva, and that is what we are
                aspiring to be; and one will notice that even practicing as little as 30
                minutes of meditation every day dramatically alters ones perspective, lowers
                anxiety like you would not believe (24/7), and gives one much more clarity
                of thought. This happened for me, and all I did was sit up, enjoy my slow
                deep breathing, and allowed my mind to quiet.

                Those 30 minutes stacked up and carried me through entire days, helped me
                see things differently, and put me on a path to bigger and better things.
                That isn't the only thing to do, but it was where my priestess started me.
                The grueling pain before, and even after, served a priceless purpose; and
                that was to motivate me to action - to put me on a path to true spiritual
                growth, to DO something that would start me in the right direction and begin
                raising my consciousness. Here's the thing though. It wasn't enough for me
                to study. I'm fairly bright, so I always thought I could rationalize
                everything and get something out of the intellectual exercise, but in this
                it doesn't work. It will serve as a valuable back-up, but no one's life has
                ever changed, to my knowledge, until they took action, sustained and wise
                action. Just as simple as asking someone far more learned than I was where
                to begin and giving it an honest go. I had nothing to lose but grueling
                pain and confusion, but treasure beyond my wildest dreams to gain. I
                figured that if I tried meditating for awhile and didn't like it, my misery
                was waiting for me, should I choose to go back to it.

                Aum Shanti,
                ~Joe

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Buddhism_101@ yahoogroups. com
                > [mailto:Buddhism_101@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of Lauren Merryfield
                > Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 1:19 AM
                > To: buddhism 101
                > Subject: [Buddhism_101] another question
                >
                >
                > Hi,
                > Since I'm on a roll with my big concerns, here is another one.
                >
                > A lot of people say "God doesn't give you more than you can
                > handle." I started out very young with scary stuff and I've
                > never totally adapted to scary things. I am still an anxious
                > person. I think I had more than I could handle at a very tender
                > age with no chance to develop a safe place to be.
                >
                > Lately I tend to stay home due to fear of the kinds of things
                > that could happen when I go out. I just prefer to stay home with
                > my kitties. Though my kitties love this, it is not good for me
                > not to get out more.
                >
                > What does Buddhism say about not being given more than we can handle?
                > thanks
                > Lauren, who really doesn't like that expression.






                ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jeremy
                I would say that anyone who thinks they know anything about god is batting out of their league. This is a wonderous world we live in, and it never ceases to
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 28, 2007
                  I would say that anyone who thinks they know anything about god is
                  batting out of their league. This is a wonderous world we live in,
                  and it never ceases to amaze even our most brilliant.

                  Therefore, I would be unconcerned.

                  The only way is to seek peace within yourself. You cannot control
                  what 'god' or anyone else throws at you. All you can do is react with
                  dignity and go on. Who is to say that there are not 100 good things
                  around the corner that you are afraid to peek around?
                • Yun Xing
                  Whos to say that in the heavens there aren t problems as here on this planet? Whos to sayy thatthe heavens and this planet are far apart... and cannot be seen?
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 28, 2007
                    Whos to say that in the heavens there aren't problems as here on this planet?
                    Whos to sayy thatthe heavens and this planet are far apart... and cannot be seen?

                    THough both are true, both are still untrue to the person who doesn't have the ability to
                    conceive of such.

                    Thoguh here and elsewhere seem to have distinctly different mannerisms, there is no difference
                    in it being far or near...only in mind and cultivation.

                    Be concerned with nothing, but do not disregard that which you cannot be concerned with.

                    Wether one knows of God or not, is not important. Though there are beings who can, it doesn't
                    mean they are better than those who cannot know God. In cultivation, it is very easy to know. But without it,
                    ignorance seems like bliss.

                    Amituofo

                    YunXing

                    净心园
                    Jing Xin Yuan

                    www.jingxinyuan.com
                    http://www.freewebs.com/yunxingpai/index.htm





                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: Jeremy <jezzur@...>
                    To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 10:00:22 PM
                    Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: another question













                    I would say that anyone who thinks they know anything about god is

                    batting out of their league. This is a wonderous world we live in,

                    and it never ceases to amaze even our most brilliant.



                    Therefore, I would be unconcerned.



                    The only way is to seek peace within yourself. You cannot control

                    what 'god' or anyone else throws at you. All you can do is react with

                    dignity and go on. Who is to say that there are not 100 good things

                    around the corner that you are afraid to peek around?














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