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rookielynn

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  • Oelund Fairking
    Dear Rookielynn, I had toyed with the idea of Buddhism off and on while a teenager, but somehow found myself continually distracted. In my mid twenties I found
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 5, 2003
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      Dear Rookielynn,

      I had toyed with the idea of Buddhism off and on while a teenager,
      but somehow found myself continually distracted. In my mid twenties I
      found myself "religiously mainstreaming". In retrospect, I think
      because I was seeking tokens of my repatriation into a family I had
      been ostracized from for dropping out of college and living on a
      hippie commune, that and its convenience, that I became a Christian
      evangelist minister, with a revival circuit that included many small,
      fringe Pentecostal churches in the Deep South (Texas Panhandle,
      Tennessee) and into Massachusetts. Eventually I had too many
      conflicts with my religion, and was tired of creating a patchwork
      over its inadequacies. Left the church, drifted and some time later
      found myself in the company of Buddhists. We shared philosophy;
      theirs was sane and mine was not. I've been staggering from
      accomplishment to accomplishment since that time.

      You asked how I was being taught: my Guru is my living. And being
      headstrong and controlling, my lessons have been forged in the bitter
      disappointment of seeing the ruins of my best laid plans and
      expectations, then understanding that life needn't have been so
      harsh, and I needn't of had been such a pain in the ass to those
      around me by my constant anger over my predicament, if had simply let
      go and allowed life to be what it is. Finally grown weary enough of
      setting myself up for pain, I am thankful to say I am starting to
      become adept.

      As for rites, rituals and practice, I think it is like creating
      shelter: it is expedient and practical to use the means at hand.
      Some might have the opportunity to be monastic, some might have the
      opportunity to set aside time to meditate and pray in the schedule of
      a householder, but neither are devoid of the means of accomplishment
      if they desire the path. At this time I am a lone practitioner, being
      a Pure land Buddhist with no temple within a twelve-hour distance
      from my home, if I did own a car. I do sit and meditate on breath,
      make offerings to Amitabha, to whom I am devoted. I have read
      considerable books, and would recommend high the works of Jeffery
      Hopkins, professor of Asian studies at the university of Virginia and
      my hero. I now have stopped study as I feel it is important to
      integrate what I have learned into practical application. I will say
      I have felt no lack from the absence of consistent formal training,
      my lessons as rigorous and exacting, and my rewards just as great. It
      is not important what you do as why, because good intentions merit
      great reward.

      Drudche
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