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Re: [Buddhism_101] Digest Number 484 - Especially for Ken/

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  • c10a8b48@island.net
    Hi Ken/: My humble and sincere apologies for taking so very long to respond to you wonderful and most informative reply to my posting of Monday, November 22,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2004
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      Hi Ken/:

      My humble and sincere apologies for taking so very long to respond to you wonderful and most informative reply to my posting of Monday, November 22, 2004

      Everything that you've shared with me is so very helpful.

      You and I are the same age, give or take a month here or there...

      Thank you so very much for explaining to me the different styles of meditation positions.  I found this aspect of your response most helpful of all the information that you shared with me. 

      I've done several things to help me concentrate more during my novice attempts at meditation since reading your response:  (1)  I've purchased a buckwheat hull filled meditation cushion and large mat filled with the same material.  (2) I also found, on my wanderings, a beautiful meditation bench.  This one is portable, therefore I can take it anywhere with on this beautiful island on which I live or I can use it at home.  (3)  I've also invested in some materials that explain and help guide a person through learning to meditate.  I don't want to get to far off the beaten path with CDs, reading materials and other things until I manage to at least learn the basics of meditation.  So, I've limited what I purchase along these lines.  I do not want to confuse myself!

      I believe that your idea of initiated a discussion on meditation here with this group is a wonderful idea!  It would certainly help those of us who live in remote areas who do not have access to a Buddhist Centre.

      One thing that I would really like to know more about is the Mala and the prayers that go with it.

      I dearly love this list and its members.  I can't wait to get up in the morning to see if there's an e-mail from you... provided that the weather hasn't knocked out the electricity and that my computer is working...  The weather here can be quite something in the late Autumn, Winter and early Springtime months.  As for my computer, it is old and cantankerous at times...  It is losing its inner peace, I'm afraid... (smile)

      Thank you, again, Ken/ and all.

      Peace,
      Cheri
      Message: 9         
         Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 10:49:44 -0500
         From: vorian@...
      Subject: Re: Hi everyone...
      
      Hi Cheri,
      I'm happy that you have found this interesting and helpful. Hopefully it will continue. Please, keep posting. Your comments and questions help all.
      
      I know what you mean about the old bones. The muscles and ligaments just don't stretch as they used to, and if you can get into a position you can't hold it. I know, I'm 57, and I've been doing this for a while, and sometimes, I still have problems. There are several varied positions that may afford you more comfort. I normally sit in a modified half lotus during meditation, but, during the rest of my practice, I sit Burmese style. I suppose I should explain the different styles that are used in meditation practices.
      Full Lotus:  Legs crossed, feet lying upside down on the top of thighs. This is the best position for the connection of the winds through the chakras. It also locks the legs so you will not fall over if you fall asleep. ;)
      
      Half Lotus:  One leg crossed, lying flat on top of the other.
      
      Burmese or Theravadan:  Both legs at right angles, one in front of the other, on the floor.
      
      Native American: Legs crossed with the feet under the thighs. I often use this one when sitting for long teachings.
      
      Japanese style with variations: Knees together, legs folded under the butt, ankles flat out behind you. This can be uncomfortable for those not brought up to it. It is necessary in learning a practice with swords.
                                      Knees apart, legs folded beside you. Sitting on floor or pillow. When sitting this way, I like to have a lot of loft. I usually fold a pillow between my legs.
                                      Knees together, a bench sitting over your ankles and butt sitting on bench.
      
      You can also sit on a chair. This is often preferable for persons with back or leg problems, or that may have weight problems, and have difficuty getting up or down. Use a steady chair that will keep your feet flat on the floor. Do not sit back but sit more toward the front of the chair. 
      The most important thing in all of these positions is that you hold you back comfortable, and relaxed, but straight.  
      
      Sometimes, to get a more comfortable seat, loft must be increased. Raise your butt on more pillows, sometimes the higher the better. There are also some very good commercial seats on the market and available online. I use a buckwheat hull filled zafu on a thick throw rug. I do recommend buckwheat hulls for comfort. 
      
      I think a discussion on meditation be be a good idea. I'll add that to the list.
      
      peace,
      Ken/       
      
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: c10a8b48@...
      To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Buddhism_101] Hi everyone...
      Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:41:08 -0800
        
    • vorian@mail.com
      Cheri, I m so glad I could help in some way. Like I have mentioned before, don t take my words as gospel, if you are interested in something I have mentioned,
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2004
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        Cheri,
        I'm so glad I could help in some way. Like I have mentioned before, don't take my words as gospel, if you are interested in something I have mentioned, please check it out, first through others writings, and then in your own practice. If it doesn't work for you, drop it.

        > I believe that your idea of initiated a
        > discussion on meditation here with this group
        > is a wonderful idea! It would certainly help
        > those of us who live in remote areas who do not
        > have access to a Buddhist Centre.

        I agree. Let's get something started after the first of the year.

        > One thing that I would really like to know more
        > about is the Mala and the prayers that go with
        > it.

        Mala beads are simply mechanisms for counting repititions of mantras. Often your lama will ask you to do a certain amount of repititions of a certain mantra, e. g. Garchen Rinpoche has asked all of his students to do 500,000 repititions of the Green Tara mantra. So, I am in the process of doing that (You don't have to do it all at one sitting).

        The Chenrezig (Chenrezig is Tibetan, Avalokitesvara is the sanscrit) mantra is the most commonly known one: Om Mani Padmi Hum, the tibetans say it: Aum Mani Peme Hung. This rolls off your tongue a little easier when repeating quickly to do lots of repititions. It is important, though, to pronounce each word. Speed comes with practice. Below is a link to help you see the benefits of this mantra.

        http://www.gardrolma.org/gar_mani.html

        Have fun,
        peace,
        ken/




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: c10a8b48@...
        To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Digest Number 484 - Especially for Ken/
        Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 19:30:08 -0800

        >
        > Hi Ken/:
        >
        > My humble and sincere apologies for taking so
        > very long to respond to you wonderful and most
        > informative reply to my posting of Monday,
        > November 22, 2004
        >
        > Everything that you've shared with me is so very helpful.
        >
        > You and I are the same age, give or take a month here or there...
        >
        > Thank you so very much for explaining to me the
        > different styles of meditation positions. I
        > found this aspect of your response most helpful
        > of all the information that you shared with me.
        > I've done several things to help me concentrate
        > more during my novice attempts at meditation
        > since reading your response: (1) I've
        > purchased a buckwheat hull filled meditation
        > cushion and large mat filled with the same
        > material. (2) I also found, on my wanderings,
        > a beautiful meditation bench. This one is
        > portable, therefore I can take it anywhere with
        > on this beautiful island on which I live or I
        > can use it at home. (3) I've also invested in
        > some materials that explain and help guide a
        > person through learning to meditate. I don't
        > want to get to far off the beaten path with
        > CDs, reading materials and other things until I
        > manage to at least learn the basics of
        > meditation. So, I've limited what I purchase
        > along these lines. I do not want to confuse
        > myself!
        >
        > I believe that your idea of initiated a
        > discussion on meditation here with this group
        > is a wonderful idea! It would certainly help
        > those of us who live in remote areas who do not
        > have access to a Buddhist Centre.
        >
        > One thing that I would really like to know more
        > about is the Mala and the prayers that go with
        > it.
        >
        > I dearly love this list and its members. I
        > can't wait to get up in the morning to see if
        > there's an e-mail from you... provided that the
        > weather hasn't knocked out the electricity and
        > that my computer is working... The weather
        > here can be quite something in the late Autumn,
        > Winter and early Springtime months. As for my
        > computer, it is old and cantankerous at
        > times... It is losing its inner peace, I'm
        > afraid... (smile)
        >
        > Thank you, again, Ken/ and all.
        >
        > Peace,
        > Cheri
        >
      • vorian@mail.com
        Another thing on malas, The number of beads may be 27, 54 or 108 -but there is always an extra bead inserted -- called the meru, so that one knows when the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2004
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          Another thing on malas,
          "The number of beads may be 27, 54 or 108 -but there is always an extra bead inserted -- called the meru, so that one knows when the cycle is finished."
          You'll find that Buddhists generally use Malas of 108 beads, although the wrist Mala is becoming more popular. Many other traditions use 108 beads as an auspicious number. I have a Nez Pierce shaman's necklace that also has 108 beads.

          peace,
          Ken/

          From: vorian@...
          To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Digest Number 484 - Especially for Ken/
          Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 08:59:15 -0500

          <snip>
        • Carla Franklin
          What exactly is a malas? I am looking to get into buddhism but Im not sure where to start...can anyone offer some advice? vorian@mail.com wrote:Another thing
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2004
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            What exactly is a malas?  I am looking to get into buddhism but Im not sure where to start...can anyone offer some advice?

            vorian@... wrote:
            Another thing on malas,
            "The number of beads may be 27, 54 or 108 -but there is always an extra bead inserted -- called the meru, so that one knows when the cycle is finished."
            You'll find that Buddhists generally use Malas of 108 beads, although the wrist Mala is becoming more popular. Many other traditions use 108 beads as an auspicious number. I have a Nez Pierce shaman's necklace that also has 108 beads.

            peace,
            Ken/

            From: vorian@...
            To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Digest Number 484 - Especially for Ken/
            Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 08:59:15 -0500

            <snip>


            Do you Yahoo!?
            The all-new My Yahoo! � What will yours do?
          • vorian@mail.com
            Hi Carla, A Mala is not something that you have to have. I mentioned it is a way to help keep track of mantra recitations. It is the Buddhist Rosary , and is
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 1, 2004
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              Hi Carla,
              A Mala is not something that you have to have. I mentioned it is a way to help keep track of mantra recitations. It is the Buddhist "Rosary", and is made from a variety of things. I use two, one, very inexpensive one, made from sandlewood, and one I bought from a sangha member who was making them and donating a part of the profits to our sangha (it is Bodhi seed). There are also 'counters' that allow to multiply the counts as you do them. For the best prices check out "Tibetan Spirit" (http://www.tibetanspirit.com/), or one of the other online stores (of which, there are many. Do a search for "Malas" or "Buddhist Ritual Items".).
              If you have a center near you that has a store (just call or email and ask), buy from them. They can always use (and, usually, need) the cash.

              Peace,
              Ken/

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Carla Franklin" <beautifulclf21@...>
              To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: Advice for a beginner
              Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 11:52:48 -0800 (PST)
              <snip>


              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "Bodhicitta is the medicine which revives and gives life to every
              sentient being who even hears of it. When you engage in fulfilling
              the needs of others, your own needs are fulfilled as a by-product."
              ~His Holiness the Dalai Lama~
            • nancy lemke
              ... thanks for the link.....i have a bodhi seed mala and i use it all the time for mantras and especialy for om mani padma hum! i got my from a temple in
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 1, 2004
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                ---
                thanks for the link.....i have a bodhi seed mala and i use it all the
                time for mantras and especialy for om mani padma hum! i got my from a
                temple in katmandu. namaste, vishaka

                In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, vorian@m... wrote:
                > Cheri,
                > I'm so glad I could help in some way. Like I have mentioned before,
                don't take my words as gospel, if you are interested in something I
                have mentioned, please check it out, first through others writings,
                and then in your own practice. If it doesn't work for you, drop it.
                >
                > > I believe that your idea of initiated a
                > > discussion on meditation here with this group
                > > is a wonderful idea! It would certainly help
                > > those of us who live in remote areas who do not
                > > have access to a Buddhist Centre.
                >
                > I agree. Let's get something started after the first of the year.
                >
                > > One thing that I would really like to know more
                > > about is the Mala and the prayers that go with
                > > it.
                >
                > Mala beads are simply mechanisms for counting repititions of
                mantras. Often your lama will ask you to do a certain amount of
                repititions of a certain mantra, e. g. Garchen Rinpoche has asked all
                of his students to do 500,000 repititions of the Green Tara mantra.
                So, I am in the process of doing that (You don't have to do it all at
                one sitting).
                >
                > The Chenrezig (Chenrezig is Tibetan, Avalokitesvara is the
                sanscrit) mantra is the most commonly known one: Om Mani Padmi Hum,
                the tibetans say it: Aum Mani Peme Hung. This rolls off your tongue a
                little easier when repeating quickly to do lots of repititions. It is
                important, though, to pronounce each word. Speed comes with practice.
                Below is a link to help you see the benefits of this mantra.
                >
                > http://www.gardrolma.org/gar_mani.html
                >
                > Have fun,
                > peace,
                > ken/
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: c10a8b48@i...
                > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Digest Number 484 - Especially for Ken/
                > Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 19:30:08 -0800
                >
                > >
                > > Hi Ken/:
                > >
                > > My humble and sincere apologies for taking so
                > > very long to respond to you wonderful and most
                > > informative reply to my posting of Monday,
                > > November 22, 2004
                > >
                > > Everything that you've shared with me is so very helpful.
                > >
                > > You and I are the same age, give or take a month here or there...
                > >
                > > Thank you so very much for explaining to me the
                > > different styles of meditation positions. I
                > > found this aspect of your response most helpful
                > > of all the information that you shared with me.
                > > I've done several things to help me concentrate
                > > more during my novice attempts at meditation
                > > since reading your response: (1) I've
                > > purchased a buckwheat hull filled meditation
                > > cushion and large mat filled with the same
                > > material. (2) I also found, on my wanderings,
                > > a beautiful meditation bench. This one is
                > > portable, therefore I can take it anywhere with
                > > on this beautiful island on which I live or I
                > > can use it at home. (3) I've also invested in
                > > some materials that explain and help guide a
                > > person through learning to meditate. I don't
                > > want to get to far off the beaten path with
                > > CDs, reading materials and other things until I
                > > manage to at least learn the basics of
                > > meditation. So, I've limited what I purchase
                > > along these lines. I do not want to confuse
                > > myself!
                > >
                > > I believe that your idea of initiated a
                > > discussion on meditation here with this group
                > > is a wonderful idea! It would certainly help
                > > those of us who live in remote areas who do not
                > > have access to a Buddhist Centre.
                > >
                > > One thing that I would really like to know more
                > > about is the Mala and the prayers that go with
                > > it.
                > >
                > > I dearly love this list and its members. I
                > > can't wait to get up in the morning to see if
                > > there's an e-mail from you... provided that the
                > > weather hasn't knocked out the electricity and
                > > that my computer is working... The weather
                > > here can be quite something in the late Autumn,
                > > Winter and early Springtime months. As for my
                > > computer, it is old and cantankerous at
                > > times... It is losing its inner peace, I'm
                > > afraid... (smile)
                > >
                > > Thank you, again, Ken/ and all.
                > >
                > > Peace,
                > > Cheri
                > >
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