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Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New To Group

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  • Michael
    Doug, While I just retired myself, I did download TNH s new book on walking meditation to my Kindle. I think walking meditation can be very good. Of course I
    Message 1 of 28 , Jul 9, 2011
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      Doug,

      While I just retired myself, I did download TNH's new book on walking meditation to my Kindle.  I think walking meditation can be very good.  Of course I think it should be used in conjunction with sitting meditation to benefit the most.

      metta
      Michael

      On 7/9/2011 7:07 PM, Dougbert wrote:  
      When we talk about western Buddhism, it is difficult because our culture is so multi-tasking, hard driving, work ethic. For years, I identified as a Buddhist, mainly to piss off the Christians. Then I decided I would embark on a spiritual sabbatical vs. retirement. I did retire, but my resume says Sabbatical. I found Theravada Tradition and the Pali text. It works for me. 
       
      The one aspect of Buddhism that is ripe for western indoctrination is Walking Meditation. Currently, Thich Nhat Hank seems to be leading the charge on this practice (see Tricycle - Summer 2011). But, I am encouraged and excited about walking meditation, because it provides mental and physical value. I still struggle with Monkey Mind, but I do walking meditation for 5 miles/ 4 to 5 times a week. When I can't sit, I walk. I wish we had an American sponsor for walking meditation. We would have to eliminate any reference to Buddhism or the religious right would denounce it. Get your Sketchers on!
       
      Metta,
       
      Deep Bows,
       
      Doug

      From: Tony Cartledge <tony.cartledge@...>
      To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, July 9, 2011 3:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New To Group

       
      Well said. I find that often the weight of tradition and doctrine and confusing practises can obscure the simple purity of the Buddhist path.The best book for getting to the core of Buddhism, in my opinion, is Steve Hagen's 'Buddhism is not what you think.' It's brilliant and cuts through to the vital core of Buddhism that runs through every tradition.

      Tony

      On Sun, Jul 10, 2011 at 8:57 AM, Jody W. Ianuzzi <jody@...> wrote:
       
      A lot of people get hung up on the idea that they need to sit cross legged
      to be 'real Buddhists'. In cultures where sitting cross legged is part of
      their culture then this not only makes sense but they also have the muscle
      development to make this comfortable.

      When an American sits cross legged it is so uncomfortable it distracts from
      the purpose of the sitting. I think it is perfectly fine to sit in a chair
      to meditate. I also have a kneeling seat and I can sit cross legged for a
      time.

      The important thing is to go back to basics, to what the Buddha taught. The
      interesting thing is the 'New Buddhism' is actually the old Buddhism.

      I also prefer Soto Zen but I enjoy reading about Chinese Buddhism and
      Tibetan as well.

      Rather then restricting yourself and saying which is best, why not embrace
      them all.

      JODY




      --
      http://circumsceptic.wordpress.com/
      Critical thinking and spirituality

      http://www.planetarytypes.com.au
      The Science of Celestial Influence



      -- 
      -----------------
      Michael
    • Dougbert
      Hi Jody,   Masons are the guys who built King Soloman s temple (3 times). Masons were the ones that built all the fine architecture in Europe. We study the
      Message 2 of 28 , Jul 9, 2011
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        Hi Jody,
         
        Masons are the guys who built King Soloman's temple (3 times). Masons were the ones that built all the fine architecture in Europe. We study the universe. We are not a church and don't see the need. 19 U.S. Presidents were Masons. A very silent, but powerful organization. George Washington was a Mason. Google Freemasonry. UCLA offers a post grad history class about Masonry in America and the world. I suggest Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol. Great read and very well researched. Bill W. stole the AA logo from Freemasonry. Dr. Bob Smith was a Mason. 
         
        Metta,
         
        Deep Bows,
         
        Doug

        From: Jody W. Ianuzzi <jody@...>
        To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, July 9, 2011 6:03 PM
        Subject: RE: [Buddhism_101] Re: New To Group

         
        Hi Doug,

        Excuse my ignorance, I don't know much about the Masons, can you explain
        more? Now the irony is that my mother's maiden name is Mason.

        JODY



      • Dougbert
        Ken,   Vietnamese Buddhism is regional and historical depending on which colonial power was attempting to control Vietnam. In the Delta region, Theravada is
        Message 3 of 28 , Jul 9, 2011
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          Ken,
           
          Vietnamese Buddhism is regional and historical depending on which colonial power was attempting to control Vietnam. In the Delta region, Theravada is prevalent. Mahayana is in the north, when the Communists allow it. You can also find Zen from Japanese occupation. Thich Nhat Hanh follows Zen tradition. As you move to Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand, Sri Lanka, and Burma, Theravada is the preferred tradition.
           
          Metta,
           
          Deep Bows,
           
          Doug

          From: ken <gebser@...>
          To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, July 9, 2011 3:18 PM
          Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New To Group

           
          Jody nailed it, IMO. Indeed, the one guru lama I've been learning from
          for several years, though Tibetan himself, has lived in the US for quite
          a few years now and adapts buddhism for Americans. And other teachers
          I've learned from do this also. For instance, they understand that
          Americans don't have a lot of free time and so can't make the same
          commitments that people in other cultures make. There's some buddhist
          proscription against dancing... this is pretty much ignored as are those
          against having sex. The central aims-- attaining enlightenment and then
          buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings by developing
          compassion and wisdom-- are still there of course. Buddhism wouldn't be
          buddhism without them.

          So perhaps of greater importance than which tradition to follow is what
          teachers are available where you live. Unless you live in a very large
          metropolitan area, chances are you aren't going to have a lot of
          choices. Eg., here in the Cleveland, Ohio area there are Gelugpa,
          Japanese Zen, Cha'an (essentially Chinese Zen), and Nyingma. There's
          also a Vietnamese buddhist temple here too, but I haven't visited it
          yet, so don't know much about it. I don't understand the Vietnamese
          language at all, so it really isn't an option for me anyway.

          So though there are options in this town, it's not as if I can select a
          tradition from the complete list and then begin practicing that sort of
          buddhism. Well, if I didn't care about having a teacher, I could study
          on my own out of books and writings from the web. But having a teacher
          that you like, who is helpful to you, is very important in buddhism--
          more important (in my experience and to my way of thinking) than the
          particular tradition within buddhism.

          As for picking a teacher, most of that depends on you. Give a teacher
          some time. You can't really make snap judgments. Nor should you assume
          that the one teacher you decide to go with will be your one and only
          teacher forever. I just read that one of my teachers himself had 39 or
          40 teachers. Frankly, that was surprising to me, but thinking about it
          now, it seems to be a great aspect of buddhism.

          hth,
          ken

          On 07/09/2011 12:34 PM Jody W. Ianuzzi wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hello Johanne's Mom,
          >
          > Ahhhh, I asked myself the same question. Which style of Buddhism is best
          > for me. I was a member of a local Buddhist group which has since broken up
          > because the teacher moved to NY. I asked him that question, which style is
          > best and his answer was "Buddhism is Buddhism". It's like comparing the
          > different types of Protestants, they are really all Christian at their core
          > but they only take a small difference in their approach.
          >
          > As Buddhism traveled across the world, it changed by each culture that
          > adopted it. The Tibetans added some Tibetan flare, the Chinese added Tao
          > and Confucianism and the Japanese added Shinto. Each has it's own charm.
          >
          > As for me, when Buddhism traveled to America we should make it American
          > Buddhism, not Tibetan or Japanese. These cultures have different traditions
          > and we have ours too. Personally I think we should take a basic look at the
          > teachings of the Buddha and we shouldn't worry about all the trappings. I
          > think he would agree.
          >
          > There are so many good books out there. I love reading what the Dalai Lama
          > has written but I don't consider myself a Tibetan Buddhist. He has such a
          > warm honest approach to everything. You can find lots online too.
          >
          > Tricycle and BuddhaNet have great info and resources too. You can Google
          > them or I can get the website addresses for you. dalailama.com has some
          > great podcasts.
          >
          > Do you have Netflix? There are some great videos you can get. Seven Years
          > in Tibet is a good one or just search for Buddhism or Buddhist.
          >
          > It's really all about basics. Things are what they are and it is our
          > interpretation of them that gets us in trouble.
          >
          > Just my two cents.
          >
          > JODY
          >

          --
          "When a society comes together and makes decisions in harmony,
          when it respects its most noble traditions, cares for its most
          vulnerable members, treats its forests and lands with respect,
          then it will prosper and not decline."
          --Buddha, Mahaparinirvana Sutra


        • Jody W. Ianuzzi
          Hello Doug, Yes, I did know many Presidents have been Masons. I have also heard that Washington DC is arranged in a Mason pattern. JODY
          Message 4 of 28 , Jul 10, 2011
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            Hello Doug,

            Yes, I did know many Presidents have been Masons. I have also heard that
            Washington DC is arranged in a Mason pattern.

            JODY
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