Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism

Expand Messages
  • colourshimmer
    Hi John, When distances are great(as in the USA)it is still possible to phone or e-mail a centre for help and support. To begin with, I personally travelled
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 21, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi John,

      When distances are great(as in the USA)it is still possible to phone or e-mail a centre for help and support. To begin with, I personally travelled for a whole day each time I wished to visit my chosen centre, so I think its possible for most people to save up and do that occasionally - in their vacation time perhaps. A teacher will give one enough practice suggestions for a considerable period of time and of course the time and distance factor can also be discussed.

      In Tibet, before the Chinese took over, people were so driven by their devotion and thirst for Dharma that they were willing to travel for days, even weeks to get to see their teachers. In earlier times, people like Marpa the translator who was teacher to Milarepa, travelled all the way on foot from Tibet to India and back to see his teacher Naropa. Modern travel and facilities in the USA make things a little easier than that I would have thought.

      If one is a beginner,then it is good to have companions on the path - but it is unwise to tell others how they should practice. If one has much experience and knowledge of those practices oneself and has completed them successfully then its OK.....maybe.
      An example is that I have seen people telling others to do 'Vajrasattva practice' in internet groups in the past, even telling this to newcomers who hadn't even decided which tradition they wished to follow or even read any of Lord Buddha's basic teachings! This to me is greatly mistaken and may cause a lot of unnecessary confusion and unsuccessful practice.

      I agree that some books recommended by certain centres are very good - but there are still some very dodgey resources around in general that people can very easily get hold of. It is still best to make an effort to seek some offline instruction. We can become very lazy with books and the internet and just go round in circles with discussions about them whilst never progressing much with our actual offline practice.

      Have you a teacher yourself, John? Perhaps you could put your suggested topic to him/her. That would make a lot more sense.
      I see no need for such a topic at BWB at present thanks, because we already have plenty of ongoing ones.


      Have you completed the Ngondro practices by the way ?



      I look forward to seeing you at BWB sometime in the future.

      Kind wishes,

      CS





      --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, John Pellecchia <pellejf@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good morning Colourshimmer,
      >
      > I tend to agree with your statements to a point but we come up with the typical conundrum especially in the USA (you on the other side of the pond seem to have more Buddhist centers readily located than we). There are not many Buddhist temples or centers where one can receive teachings. It's not uncommon for centers to be well out of the realm of commuting. Many people resort, therefore, to books and the Internet as a "teacher" in absentia. Fortunately, some centers are beginning to offer teachings over broadband. We do run into sites that proffer advice without the backing of knowledge. We both are aware of such websites. Yes, one needs to be careful of mixing traditions but, in my opinion, an e-sangha is better than a no-sangha.
      >
      > Obviously, one should never recommend higher tantric practices nor should one attempt them on their own without qualified instruction. But practices (prayers if you will) that do not require empowerment should be suitable for the practitioner in any case. That's why reliable sources such as Tibetan Treasures ( http://tibetantreasures.com ), Snow Lion Publishers ( http://www.snowlionpub.com ),and Namsebangdzo Book Store ( http://www.namsebangdzo.com ) to name a few clearly delineate texts that require empowerment and are restricted. Tibetan Treasures even requires the purchaser to give "...the name of the qualified lineage holder from whom you received the empowerment, as well as the approximate date and location" when ordering restricted texts as does Snow Lion Publications. It's too bad that booksellers in general do not follow suit or give this caveat on their sites. I have, as I believe have you, seen advanced Mahamudra texts offered without
      > restriction. However, if practices are recorded in texts as being suitable for general usage and require no empowerment, I see no harm neither in their use nor suggestion for same. This may be a topic to consider at BWB to get a more vocal group's input. I'd be interested in their opinions but I'll leave that to your discretion. I may even join in on the discussion but I hold the right to copy-and-paste my opinion from here to there. I hate typing, ;-)
      >
      > May all be at peace.
      >
      > John
      >
      > He should not kill a living being,
      > nor cause it to be killed,
      > nor should he incite another to kill.
      > Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.
      >
      > (Sutta Nipata II,14)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: colourshimmer <colourshimmer@...>
      > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 4:41:42 PM
      > Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
      >
      > Hi John,
      >
      > Yes,I'm from the UK and you've encountered me before. :-)
      >
      > Regarding Tibetan Buddhism in general, one should seek advice and instruction from an authentic Vajrayana teacher.The whole of Tibetan Buddhist practice revolves around these instructions. It is not therefore appropriate to just pick and choose practices from the internet. One should do a practice that one's teacher advises because different practices suit different kinds of people.
      >
      > As students, whilst supporting each other, we should always be wary of telling others which practices and empowerments they should do. That's up to the teachers to decide. Personally I have never done a practice, been to a teaching or an empowerment without having my teachers instructions to do so first.
      >
      > I would therefore,advise beginners to contact their nearest centre for advice on these matters.
      >
      > Kind wishes,
      > CS
      >
    • shellshucked
      John and CS, I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the
      Message 2 of 26 , Apr 21, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        John and CS,

        I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.

        Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.

        Louisa

        --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, John Pellecchia <pellejf@...> wrote:
        >
        > Good morning Colourshimmer,
        >
        > I tend to agree with your statements to a point but we come up with the typical conundrum especially in the USA (you on the other side of the pond seem to have more Buddhist centers readily located than we). There are not many Buddhist temples or centers where one can receive teachings. It's not uncommon for centers to be well out of the realm of commuting. Many people resort, therefore, to books and the Internet as a "teacher" in absentia. Fortunately, some centers are beginning to offer teachings over broadband. We do run into sites that proffer advice without the backing of knowledge. We both are aware of such websites. Yes, one needs to be careful of mixing traditions but, in my opinion, an e-sangha is better than a no-sangha.
        >
        > Obviously, one should never recommend higher tantric practices nor should one attempt them on their own without qualified instruction. But practices (prayers if you will) that do not require empowerment should be suitable for the practitioner in any case. That's why reliable sources such as Tibetan Treasures ( http://tibetantreasures.com ), Snow Lion Publishers ( http://www.snowlionpub.com ),and Namsebangdzo Book Store ( http://www.namsebangdzo.com ) to name a few clearly delineate texts that require empowerment and are restricted. Tibetan Treasures even requires the purchaser to give "...the name of the qualified lineage holder from whom you received the empowerment, as well as the approximate date and location" when ordering restricted texts as does Snow Lion Publications. It's too bad that booksellers in general do not follow suit or give this caveat on their sites. I have, as I believe have you, seen advanced Mahamudra texts offered without
        > restriction. However, if practices are recorded in texts as being suitable for general usage and require no empowerment, I see no harm neither in their use nor suggestion for same. This may be a topic to consider at BWB to get a more vocal group's input. I'd be interested in their opinions but I'll leave that to your discretion. I may even join in on the discussion but I hold the right to copy-and-paste my opinion from here to there. I hate typing, ;-)
        >
        > May all be at peace.
        >
        > John
        >
        > He should not kill a living being,
        > nor cause it to be killed,
        > nor should he incite another to kill.
        > Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.
        >
        > (Sutta Nipata II,14)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: colourshimmer <colourshimmer@...>
        > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 4:41:42 PM
        > Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
        >
        > Hi John,
        >
        > Yes,I'm from the UK and you've encountered me before. :-)
        >
        > Regarding Tibetan Buddhism in general, one should seek advice and instruction from an authentic Vajrayana teacher.The whole of Tibetan Buddhist practice revolves around these instructions. It is not therefore appropriate to just pick and choose practices from the internet. One should do a practice that one's teacher advises because different practices suit different kinds of people.
        >
        > As students, whilst supporting each other, we should always be wary of telling others which practices and empowerments they should do. That's up to the teachers to decide. Personally I have never done a practice, been to a teaching or an empowerment without having my teachers instructions to do so first.
        >
        > I would therefore,advise beginners to contact their nearest centre for advice on these matters.
        >
        > Kind wishes,
        > CS
        >
      • ken
        Thanks for that post, John. I had similar sentiments. Personally, I have so many questions all the time and no one authoritative to ask. So I ask here and
        Message 3 of 26 , Apr 21, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for that post, John. I had similar sentiments. Personally, I
          have so many questions all the time and no one authoritative to ask. So
          I ask here and there and everywhere a satisfactory answer may be possible.

          And in a sense I concur that it can be quite hazardous to attempt some
          "advanced" practices. I've said as much before on this very list. At
          the same time, I feel that if a person sincerely, in their heart most
          fundamental, is doing something for the benefit of all sentient beings,
          then it is okay. Granted, I'm a nobody in the big world of buddhism, so
          you don't have to listen to me. But if my motivations are true and
          pure, how can it be wrong to do something, specifically reading a book
          reserved for others allegedly, officially, more enlightened than I.
          Where would we be today if someone had approached Buddha Shakyamuni,
          wagged a finger at him, and said, "You are treading outside the
          orthodoxy; you should stop that" and then he did stop? That may seem a
          heavy-handed example, for I am not Buddha. Yet Buddha began as an
          ordinary man. And, I'm told, we all, every one of us, has within us a
          Buddha nature. Are we to be restrained in our searching and striving
          for enlightenment because we don't have an official guide? Buddha
          wasn't. Whether we are fortunate enough to have an enlightened and
          learned guide or not, we are all responsible for our own fate and our
          own existence. The guide-- though he can help us-- is not responsible.
          Buddhism is not responsible. If Buddha himself could reach to me and
          touch me and, in so doing, bring me to enlightenment, I'm sure he would
          do that. I have to assume that it has to do with my taking
          responsibility for myself, for finding enlightenment wherever and
          however I can... for myself and all other sentient beings.


          Best to all,
          ken

          On 04/21/2009 07:27 AM John Pellecchia wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Good morning Colourshimmer,
          >
          > I tend to agree with your statements to a point but we come up with the
          > typical conundrum especially in the USA (you on the other side of the
          > pond seem to have more Buddhist centers readily located than we). There
          > are not many Buddhist temples or centers where one can receive
          > teachings. It's not uncommon for centers to be well out of the realm of
          > commuting. Many people resort, therefore, to books and the Internet as a
          > "teacher" in absentia. Fortunately, some centers are beginning to offer
          > teachings over broadband. We do run into sites that proffer advice
          > without the backing of knowledge. We both are aware of such websites.
          > Yes, one needs to be careful of mixing traditions but, in my opinion, an
          > e-sangha is better than a no-sangha.
          >
          > Obviously, one should never recommend higher tantric practices nor
          > should one attempt them on their own without qualified instruction. But
          > practices (prayers if you will) that do not require empowerment should
          > be suitable for the practitioner in any case. That's why reliable
          > sources such as Tibetan Treasures ( http://tibetantreasures.com
          > <http://tibetantreasures.com> ), Snow Lion Publishers (
          > http://www.snowlionpub.com <http://www.snowlionpub.com> ), and
          > Namsebangdzo Book Store ( http://www.namsebangdzo.com
          > <http://www.namsebangdzo.com> ) to name a few clearly delineate texts
          > that require empowerment and are restricted. Tibetan Treasures even
          > requires the purchaser to give "...the name of the qualified lineage
          > holder from whom you received the empowerment, as well as the
          > approximate date and location" when ordering restricted texts as does
          > Snow Lion Publications. It's too bad that booksellers in general do not
          > follow suit or give this caveat on their sites. I have, as I believe
          > have you, seen advanced Mahamudra texts offered without restriction.
          > However, if practices are recorded in texts as being suitable for
          > general usage and require no empowerment, I see no harm neither in their
          > use nor suggestion for same. This may be a topic to consider at BWB to
          > get a more vocal group's input. I'd be interested in their opinions but
          > I'll leave that to your discretion. I may even join in on the discussion
          > but I hold the right to copy-and-paste my opinion from here to there. I
          > hate typing, ;-)
          >
          > May all be at peace.
          >
          > John
          >
          > He should not kill a living being,
          > nor cause it to be killed,
          > nor should he incite another to kill.
          > Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.
          >
          > (Sutta Nipata II,14)
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > *From:* colourshimmer <colourshimmer@...>
          > *To:* Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
          > *Sent:* Monday, April 20, 2009 4:41:42 PM
          > *Subject:* [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
          >
          > Hi John,
          >
          > Yes,I'm from the UK and you've encountered me before. :-)
          >
          > Regarding Tibetan Buddhism in general, one should seek advice and
          > instruction from an authentic Vajrayana teacher.The whole of Tibetan
          > Buddhist practice revolves around these instructions. It is not
          > therefore appropriate to just pick and choose practices from the
          > internet. One should do a practice that one's teacher advises because
          > different practices suit different kinds of people.
          >
          > As students, whilst supporting each other, we should always be wary of
          > telling others which practices and empowerments they should do. That's
          > up to the teachers to decide. Personally I have never done a practice,
          > been to a teaching or an empowerment without having my teachers
          > instructions to do so first.
          >
          > I would therefore,advise beginners to contact their nearest centre for
          > advice on these matters.
          >
          > Kind wishes,
          > CS
          >
          >
        • colourshimmer
          ... Hi Louisa, Tara practice can bring many blessings! The text is very inspiring and beautiful. Is it not possible for you to communicate with your teacher by
          Message 4 of 26 , Apr 21, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "shellshucked" <shellshucked@...> wrote:
            >
            Hi Louisa,

            Tara practice can bring many blessings! The text is very inspiring and beautiful.
            Is it not possible for you to communicate with your teacher by letter and still get some guidance? I'm sure that this would be possible.

            Kind wishes,
            CS



            > John and CS,
            >
            > I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.
            >
            > Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.
            >
            > Louisa
            >
            > --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, John Pellecchia <pellejf@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Good morning Colourshimmer,
            > >
            > > I tend to agree with your statements to a point but we come up with the typical conundrum especially in the USA (you on the other side of the pond seem to have more Buddhist centers readily located than we). There are not many Buddhist temples or centers where one can receive teachings. It's not uncommon for centers to be well out of the realm of commuting. Many people resort, therefore, to books and the Internet as a "teacher" in absentia. Fortunately, some centers are beginning to offer teachings over broadband. We do run into sites that proffer advice without the backing of knowledge. We both are aware of such websites. Yes, one needs to be careful of mixing traditions but, in my opinion, an e-sangha is better than a no-sangha.
            > >
            > > Obviously, one should never recommend higher tantric practices nor should one attempt them on their own without qualified instruction. But practices (prayers if you will) that do not require empowerment should be suitable for the practitioner in any case. That's why reliable sources such as Tibetan Treasures ( http://tibetantreasures.com ), Snow Lion Publishers ( http://www.snowlionpub.com ),and Namsebangdzo Book Store ( http://www.namsebangdzo.com ) to name a few clearly delineate texts that require empowerment and are restricted. Tibetan Treasures even requires the purchaser to give "...the name of the qualified lineage holder from whom you received the empowerment, as well as the approximate date and location" when ordering restricted texts as does Snow Lion Publications. It's too bad that booksellers in general do not follow suit or give this caveat on their sites. I have, as I believe have you, seen advanced Mahamudra texts offered without
            > > restriction. However, if practices are recorded in texts as being suitable for general usage and require no empowerment, I see no harm neither in their use nor suggestion for same. This may be a topic to consider at BWB to get a more vocal group's input. I'd be interested in their opinions but I'll leave that to your discretion. I may even join in on the discussion but I hold the right to copy-and-paste my opinion from here to there. I hate typing, ;-)
            > >
            > > May all be at peace.
            > >
            > > John
            > >
            > > He should not kill a living being,
            > > nor cause it to be killed,
            > > nor should he incite another to kill.
            > > Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.
            > >
            > > (Sutta Nipata II,14)
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ________________________________
            > > From: colourshimmer <colourshimmer@>
            > > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 4:41:42 PM
            > > Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
            > >
            > > Hi John,
            > >
            > > Yes,I'm from the UK and you've encountered me before. :-)
            > >
            > > Regarding Tibetan Buddhism in general, one should seek advice and instruction from an authentic Vajrayana teacher.The whole of Tibetan Buddhist practice revolves around these instructions. It is not therefore appropriate to just pick and choose practices from the internet. One should do a practice that one's teacher advises because different practices suit different kinds of people.
            > >
            > > As students, whilst supporting each other, we should always be wary of telling others which practices and empowerments they should do. That's up to the teachers to decide. Personally I have never done a practice, been to a teaching or an empowerment without having my teachers instructions to do so first.
            > >
            > > I would therefore,advise beginners to contact their nearest centre for advice on these matters.
            > >
            > > Kind wishes,
            > > CS
            > >
            >
          • colourshimmer
            Hi Ken, If one practices with a pure heart of course its excellent! However if we are doing Tibetan Buddhist practices in particular, rather than our own
            Message 5 of 26 , Apr 21, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Ken,

              If one practices with a pure heart of course its excellent! However if we are doing Tibetan Buddhist practices in particular, rather than our own versions, or the practices of other traditions, then we need to have the guidance and input of a teacher for certain practices to be successfully accomplished. With certain practices one may well attempt them without a teacher but there may not be any useful progress as a result. There are also practices available on the internet which can cause psychological harm if not properly understood.
              I've been a TB practitioner for over 30 years, Ken.I do have some experience of this and I simply wanted to give some useful advice to beginners to TB in this group. I hope your comment "reserved for others allegedly, officially, more enlightened than I" wasn't aimed at me.
              Of course people must do whatever they think is best. People are welcome to e-mail me with further enquiries if they wish.

              Kind wishes,
              CS


              --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken <gebser@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Thanks for that post, John. I had similar sentiments. Personally, I
              > have so many questions all the time and no one authoritative to ask. So
              > I ask here and there and everywhere a satisfactory answer may be possible.
              >
              > And in a sense I concur that it can be quite hazardous to attempt some
              > "advanced" practices. I've said as much before on this very list. At
              > the same time, I feel that if a person sincerely, in their heart most
              > fundamental, is doing something for the benefit of all sentient beings,
              > then it is okay. Granted, I'm a nobody in the big world of buddhism, so
              > you don't have to listen to me. But if my motivations are true and
              > pure, how can it be wrong to do something, specifically reading a book
              > reserved for others allegedly, officially, more enlightened than I.
              > Where would we be today if someone had approached Buddha Shakyamuni,
              > wagged a finger at him, and said, "You are treading outside the
              > orthodoxy; you should stop that" and then he did stop? That may seem a
              > heavy-handed example, for I am not Buddha. Yet Buddha began as an
              > ordinary man. And, I'm told, we all, every one of us, has within us a
              > Buddha nature. Are we to be restrained in our searching and striving
              > for enlightenment because we don't have an official guide? Buddha
              > wasn't. Whether we are fortunate enough to have an enlightened and
              > learned guide or not, we are all responsible for our own fate and our
              > own existence. The guide-- though he can help us-- is not responsible.
              > Buddhism is not responsible. If Buddha himself could reach to me and
              > touch me and, in so doing, bring me to enlightenment, I'm sure he would
              > do that. I have to assume that it has to do with my taking
              > responsibility for myself, for finding enlightenment wherever and
              > however I can... for myself and all other sentient beings.
              >
              >
              > Best to all,
              > ken
              >
              > On 04/21/2009 07:27 AM John Pellecchia wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Good morning Colourshimmer,
              > >
              > > I tend to agree with your statements to a point but we come up with the
              > > typical conundrum especially in the USA (you on the other side of the
              > > pond seem to have more Buddhist centers readily located than we). There
              > > are not many Buddhist temples or centers where one can receive
              > > teachings. It's not uncommon for centers to be well out of the realm of
              > > commuting. Many people resort, therefore, to books and the Internet as a
              > > "teacher" in absentia. Fortunately, some centers are beginning to offer
              > > teachings over broadband. We do run into sites that proffer advice
              > > without the backing of knowledge. We both are aware of such websites.
              > > Yes, one needs to be careful of mixing traditions but, in my opinion, an
              > > e-sangha is better than a no-sangha.
              > >
              > > Obviously, one should never recommend higher tantric practices nor
              > > should one attempt them on their own without qualified instruction. But
              > > practices (prayers if you will) that do not require empowerment should
              > > be suitable for the practitioner in any case. That's why reliable
              > > sources such as Tibetan Treasures ( http://tibetantreasures.com
              > > <http://tibetantreasures.com> ), Snow Lion Publishers (
              > > http://www.snowlionpub.com <http://www.snowlionpub.com> ), and
              > > Namsebangdzo Book Store ( http://www.namsebangdzo.com
              > > <http://www.namsebangdzo.com> ) to name a few clearly delineate texts
              > > that require empowerment and are restricted. Tibetan Treasures even
              > > requires the purchaser to give "...the name of the qualified lineage
              > > holder from whom you received the empowerment, as well as the
              > > approximate date and location" when ordering restricted texts as does
              > > Snow Lion Publications. It's too bad that booksellers in general do not
              > > follow suit or give this caveat on their sites. I have, as I believe
              > > have you, seen advanced Mahamudra texts offered without restriction.
              > > However, if practices are recorded in texts as being suitable for
              > > general usage and require no empowerment, I see no harm neither in their
              > > use nor suggestion for same. This may be a topic to consider at BWB to
              > > get a more vocal group's input. I'd be interested in their opinions but
              > > I'll leave that to your discretion. I may even join in on the discussion
              > > but I hold the right to copy-and-paste my opinion from here to there. I
              > > hate typing, ;-)
              > >
              > > May all be at peace.
              > >
              > > John
              > >
              > > He should not kill a living being,
              > > nor cause it to be killed,
              > > nor should he incite another to kill.
              > > Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.
              > >
              > > (Sutta Nipata II,14)
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > > *From:* colourshimmer <colourshimmer@...>
              > > *To:* Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
              > > *Sent:* Monday, April 20, 2009 4:41:42 PM
              > > *Subject:* [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
              > >
              > > Hi John,
              > >
              > > Yes,I'm from the UK and you've encountered me before. :-)
              > >
              > > Regarding Tibetan Buddhism in general, one should seek advice and
              > > instruction from an authentic Vajrayana teacher.The whole of Tibetan
              > > Buddhist practice revolves around these instructions. It is not
              > > therefore appropriate to just pick and choose practices from the
              > > internet. One should do a practice that one's teacher advises because
              > > different practices suit different kinds of people.
              > >
              > > As students, whilst supporting each other, we should always be wary of
              > > telling others which practices and empowerments they should do. That's
              > > up to the teachers to decide. Personally I have never done a practice,
              > > been to a teaching or an empowerment without having my teachers
              > > instructions to do so first.
              > >
              > > I would therefore,advise beginners to contact their nearest centre for
              > > advice on these matters.
              > >
              > > Kind wishes,
              > > CS
              > >
              > >
              >
            • John Pellecchia
              Good morning Colourshimmer. I ll leave the issue of a short Vajrasattva practice on the back burner since there is obviously a difference of opinion on the
              Message 6 of 26 , Apr 22, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Good morning Colourshimmer.

                I'll leave the issue of a short Vajrasattva practice on the back burner since there is obviously a difference of opinion on the matter.

                > Have you a teacher yourself, John? Perhaps you could put your suggested topic to him/her. That would make a lot more sense.

                I have had many teachers of different belief systems / practices. Some famous (one rather "infamous" non-Buddhist Roman Catholic priest who was probably one of the most Buddhist people I ever knew). Some teachers I have had the pleasure and honor to meet in person while others the pleasure was only through mind, broadband, and texts. I have been to several temples/meditation centers but I'm still searching. I am still seeking my root-teacher. I know this may sound like a lot of running helter-skelter but, as the saying goes, when the student is ready the teacher will appear. So my search continues.

                >Have you completed the Ngondro practices by the way ?

                Unfortunately, no. Time constraints and physical limitations are my primary reasons. Time constraints have improved but not the latter (lol).

                Just as an aside, I don't think Ken's comment "...reserved for others allegedly, officially, more enlightened than I" was directed at anyone specifically much less yourself. I've known him far too long to believe otherwise.

                Hope all is well on your side of the ocean. We're presently having unseasonably cool weather (what *ever* happened to global warming? ) on the eastern seaboard. I really could use some warm weather for these ol' bones. Hope to see you on BWB if not here sooner.

                May all be at peace.

                John
                 
                Above, across or back again,
                wherever he goes in the world
                let him carefully scrutinise
                the rise and fall of compounded things.

                (Itivuttaka 120)



                From: colourshimmer <colourshimmer@...>
                To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 9:14:54 AM
                Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism



                Hi John,

                When distances are great(as in the USA)it is still possible to phone or e-mail a centre for help and support. To begin with, I personally travelled for a whole day each time I wished to visit my chosen centre, so I think its possible for most people to save up and do that occasionally - in their vacation time perhaps. A teacher will give one enough practice suggestions for a considerable period of time and of course the time and distance factor can also be discussed.

                In Tibet, before the Chinese took over, people were so driven by their devotion and thirst for Dharma that they were willing to travel for days, even weeks to get to see their teachers. In earlier times, people like Marpa the translator who was teacher to Milarepa, travelled all the way on foot from Tibet to India and back to see his teacher Naropa. Modern travel and facilities in the USA make things a little easier than that I would have thought.
                 
                If one is a beginner,then it is good to have companions on the path - but it is unwise to tell others how they should practice. If one has much experience and knowledge of those practices oneself and has completed them successfully then its OK.....maybe.
                An example is  that I have seen people telling others to do 'Vajrasattva practice' in internet groups in the past, even telling this to newcomers who hadn't even decided which tradition they wished to follow or even read any of Lord Buddha's basic teachings! This to me is greatly mistaken and may cause a lot of unnecessary confusion and unsuccessful practice.

                I agree that some books recommended by certain centres are very good - but there are still some very dodgey resources around in general that people can very easily get hold of. It is still best to make an effort to seek some offline instruction. We can become very lazy with books and the internet and just go round in circles with discussions about them whilst never progressing much with our actual offline practice.

                Have you a teacher yourself, John? Perhaps you could put your suggested topic to him/her. That would make a lot more sense.
                I see no need for such a topic at BWB at present thanks, because we already have plenty of ongoing ones.


                Have you completed the Ngondro practices by the way ?



                I look forward to seeing you at BWB sometime in the future.

                Kind wishes,

                CS

              • John Pellecchia
                Good morning Louisa. As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact, this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform. Humm...I
                Message 7 of 26 , Apr 22, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Good morning Louisa.

                  As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact, this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform. Humm...I wonder if it's suitable to perform that practice without receiving an empowerment <smile>.

                  I can certainly agree with the problem regarding finding a sangha to "round out" the Triple Gem. I don't think people realize the difficulties one faces in certain countries or areas of the USA. Buddhism is gaining a following and inroads but either there are few centers or they are well kept "secrets".

                  As I stated, there are some centers that offer video taped lessons on the Internet but again, as Colourshimmer stated, some are a bit "dodgey" (you *have* to like UK terminology <smile>).

                  I can certainly empathize with your statement, "Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings." It seems we are in a similar "boat". When I drive three-and-one-half hours to visit it takes me a while just to loosen up, I guess we'll just have to see how Buddhism progresses in our areas.

                  I read somewhere that teachings by texts are being accepted as suitable in Western society by traditional Buddhist schools. It seems as though there is a recognition that there is a need in one respect but a hole in the other. I searched in my library but haven't been able to locate the exact quote or by whom it was said. Anyway, I'll take a book over nothing but even there I urge caution. It seems there are many instant Buddhist "experts" on the shelves of late.

                  I hope you are well, Louisa, and happy that you are beginning your practice again.

                  May all be at peace.

                  John

                  May all creatures, all living things,
                  all beings one and all,
                  experience good fortune only.
                  May they not fall into harm.

                  (Anguttara Nikaya II, 72)


                  From: shellshucked <shellshucked@...>
                  To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:56:03 AM
                  Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism

                  John and CS,

                  I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.

                  Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.

                  Louisa

                • shellshucked
                  John and CS, You can lay your worries aside. I did receive a Tara empowerment about five years ago, before I began the practice. In just three short days of
                  Message 8 of 26 , Apr 22, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John and CS,

                    You can lay your worries aside. I did receive a Tara empowerment about five years ago, before I began the practice. In just three short days of going for refuge and doing the Tara practice, I feel much more peaceful. What a blessing!

                    I appreciate all of the support I've found here.

                    Louisa

                    --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, John Pellecchia <pellejf@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Good morning Louisa.
                    >
                    > As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact, this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform. Humm...I wonder if it's suitable to perform that practice without receiving an empowerment <smile>.
                    >
                    > I can certainly agree with the problem regarding finding a sangha to "round out" the Triple Gem. I don't think people realize the difficulties one faces in certain countries or areas of the USA. Buddhism is gaining a following and inroads but either there are few centers or they are well kept "secrets".
                    >
                    > As I stated, there are some centers that offer video taped lessons on the Internet but again, as Colourshimmer stated, some are a bit "dodgey" (you *have* to like UK terminology <smile>).
                    >
                    > I can certainly empathize with your statement, "Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings." It seems we are in a similar "boat". When I drive three-and-one-half hours to visit it takes me a while just to loosen up, I guess we'll just have to see how Buddhism progresses in our areas.
                    >
                    > I read somewhere that teachings by texts are being accepted as suitable in Western society by traditional Buddhist schools. It seems as though there is a recognition that there is a need in one respect but a hole in the other. I searched in my library but haven't been able to locate the exact quote or by whom it was said. Anyway, I'll take a book over nothing but even there I urge caution. It seems there are many instant Buddhist "experts" on the shelves of late.
                    >
                    > I hope you are well, Louisa, and happy that you are beginning your practice again.
                    >
                    > May all be at peace.
                    >
                    > John
                    >
                    > May all creatures, all living things,
                    > all beings one and all,
                    > experience good fortune only.
                    > May they not fall into harm.
                    >
                    > (Anguttara Nikaya II, 72)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: shellshucked <shellshucked@...>
                    > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:56:03 AM
                    > Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
                    >
                    > John and CS,
                    >
                    > I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.
                    >
                    > Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.
                    >
                    > Louisa
                    >
                  • ken
                    ... John and everyone, Yes, absolutely. that comment was certainly *not* directed at anyone in particular, not anyone on this list, nor anyone in the world in
                    Message 9 of 26 , Apr 22, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On 04/22/2009 06:11 AM John Pellecchia wrote:
                      > ....
                      >
                      > Just as an aside, I don't think Ken's comment "...reserved for others
                      > allegedly, officially, more enlightened than I" was directed at anyone
                      > specifically much less yourself. I've known him far too long to believe
                      > otherwise.
                      >
                      > ....

                      John and everyone,

                      Yes, absolutely. that comment was certainly *not* directed at anyone in
                      particular, not anyone on this list, nor anyone in the world in
                      particular. I was speaking in generalities, purely theoretically. I
                      have to say that it bothers me a bit that anyone would even have to make
                      such a disclaimer on my behalf. (Thanks though, John, for doing so.) I
                      must be doing a terrible job of making myself understood. Well, there's
                      something else I need to work on.

                      Peace to all,
                      ken
                    • rocammack@s6
                      John That s part of my trouble. I can t find anything round here - the middle of the Argentina pampas - to give me guidance. This group is the best I can
                      Message 10 of 26 , Apr 23, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        John
                         
                        That's part of my trouble. I can't find anything round here  - the middle of the Argentina pampas  - to give me guidance.  This group is the best I can find so far.  Perhaps a sort of correspondence course might be a good idea.
                         
                        Robert
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 8:00 AM
                        Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism

                        Good morning Louisa.

                        As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact, this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform. Humm...I wonder if it's suitable to perform that practice without receiving an empowerment <smile>.

                        I can certainly agree with the problem regarding finding a sangha to "round out" the Triple Gem. I don't think people realize the difficulties one faces in certain countries or areas of the USA. Buddhism is gaining a following and inroads but either there are few centers or they are well kept "secrets".

                        As I stated, there are some centers that offer video taped lessons on the Internet but again, as Colourshimmer stated, some are a bit "dodgey" (you *have* to like UK terminology <smile>).

                        I can certainly empathize with your statement, "Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings." It seems we are in a similar "boat". When I drive three-and-one- half hours to visit it takes me a while just to loosen up, I guess we'll just have to see how Buddhism progresses in our areas.

                        I read somewhere that teachings by texts are being accepted as suitable in Western society by traditional Buddhist schools. It seems as though there is a recognition that there is a need in one respect but a hole in the other. I searched in my library but haven't been able to locate the exact quote or by whom it was said. Anyway, I'll take a book over nothing but even there I urge caution. It seems there are many instant Buddhist "experts" on the shelves of late.

                        I hope you are well, Louisa, and happy that you are beginning your practice again.

                        May all be at peace.

                        John

                        May all creatures, all living things,
                        all beings one and all,
                        experience good fortune only.
                        May they not fall into harm.

                        (Anguttara Nikaya II, 72)


                        From: shellshucked <shellshucked@ yahoo.com>
                        To: Buddhism_101@ yahoogroups. com
                        Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:56:03 AM
                        Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism

                        John and CS,

                        I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.

                        Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.

                        Louisa

                      • ken
                        There s plenty of videos and audio files and texts out on the web which might be helpful. Some good stuff is to be found in the Files and Links sections of
                        Message 11 of 26 , Apr 23, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          There's plenty of videos and audio files and texts out on the web which
                          might be helpful. Some good stuff is to be found in the Files and Links
                          sections of the Buddhism 101 website too.


                          On 04/23/2009 06:13 PM rocammack@s6 wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > John
                          >
                          > That's part of my trouble. I can't find anything round here - the
                          > middle of the Argentina pampas - to give me guidance. This group is
                          > the best I can find so far. Perhaps a sort of correspondence course
                          > might be a good idea.
                          >
                          > Robert
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > *From:* John Pellecchia <mailto:pellejf@...>
                          > *To:* Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                          > <mailto:Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com>
                          > *Sent:* Wednesday, April 22, 2009 8:00 AM
                          > *Subject:* Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
                          >
                          > Good morning Louisa.
                          >
                          > As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact,
                          > this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform.
                          > Humm...I wonder if it's suitable to perform that practice without
                          > receiving an empowerment <smile>.
                          >
                          > I can certainly agree with the problem regarding finding a sangha to
                          > "round out" the Triple Gem. I don't think people realize the
                          > difficulties one faces in certain countries or areas of the USA.
                          > Buddhism is gaining a following and inroads but either there are few
                          > centers or they are well kept "secrets".
                          >
                          > As I stated, there are some centers that offer video taped lessons
                          > on the Internet but again, as Colourshimmer stated, some are a bit
                          > "dodgey" (you *have* to like UK terminology <smile>).
                          >
                          > I can certainly empathize with your statement, "Given a medical
                          > condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to
                          > attend teachings." It seems we are in a similar "boat". When I drive
                          > three-and-one-half hours to visit it takes me a while just to loosen
                          > up, I guess we'll just have to see how Buddhism progresses in our areas.
                          >
                          > I read somewhere that teachings by texts are being accepted as
                          > suitable in Western society by traditional Buddhist schools. It
                          > seems as though there is a recognition that there is a need in one
                          > respect but a hole in the other. I searched in my library but
                          > haven't been able to locate the exact quote or by whom it was said.
                          > Anyway, I'll take a book over nothing but even there I urge caution.
                          > It seems there are many instant Buddhist "experts" on the shelves of
                          > late.
                          >
                          > I hope you are well, Louisa, and happy that you are beginning your
                          > practice again.
                          >
                          > May all be at peace.
                          >
                          > John
                          >
                          > May all creatures, all living things,
                          > all beings one and all,
                          > experience good fortune only.
                          > May they not fall into harm.
                          >
                          > (Anguttara Nikaya II, 72)
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          > *From:* shellshucked <shellshucked@...>
                          > *To:* Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                          > *Sent:* Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:56:03 AM
                          > *Subject:* [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
                          >
                          > John and CS,
                          >
                          > I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several
                          > years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different
                          > part of the country where there is not a center for miles around.
                          > Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an
                          > entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances
                          > would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can
                          > from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I
                          > needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at
                          > this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.
                          >
                          > Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily
                          > refuge and Tara practice.
                          >
                          > Louisa
                          >
                          >
                        • John Pellecchia
                          Good morning Robert. I know exactly what you mean. As I said, most people don t realize the difficulties we experience in locating physical Sanghas in certain
                          Message 12 of 26 , Apr 23, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Good morning Robert.

                            I know exactly what you mean. As I said, most people don't realize the difficulties we experience in locating physical Sanghas in certain parts of the world. Yes, there are many sites on the Internet but you have to proceed with a degree of caution just as you would need to be cautious with certain so-called "Buddhist" groups (I'd prefer not to get into that topic in an open forum). There are many reputable sites and there are many that are not.

                            You may wish to try http://www.youtube.com and enter a search like "buddhism". Most of the teachings are general in nature and are rather short. I don't know what tradition or school you're drawn to so it's difficult to offer suggestions. But since this site is primarily dedicated to Tibetan Buddhism there are several sites I could suggest.

                            Colourshimmer gave three excellent sites:

                            http://www.rinpoche.com/

                            http://www.samyeling.org/

                            http://www.kagyu.org/kagyulineage/buddhism/index.php
                             
                             One reliable source for correspondence Buddhism in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition is The Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition at their Foundation Store ( http://www.fpmt.org/shop/category.aspx?SID=1&Category_ID=28&AFID=17 ). They offer videos one may purchase compete with worksheets in pdf format, a cite you may pose questions about the module you're using, and even tests you may mail back for grading. If you decide to order their components, you may wish to inquire to make sure the CDs are compatible with players in South America (that's as technical as I can get in that area).

                            Another is http://www.namsebangdzo.com/ (affiliated with the kagyu.org site Colourshimmer posted) which offers many tapes and CDs on various Buddhist topics. You may also try http://pt.chagdud.org/en/akshobhya/ which lists some centers founded by the late His Eminence Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche in South America (primarily in Brasil).

                            A while ago I had posted a database on this site of websites you may find of use (I hope the links are still active) and where one may get reliable information on the Internet from various traditions (see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhism_101/database?method=reportRows&tbl=1 ). Unfortunately the URLs are not hyperlinks so you'll have to copy-and-paste.

                            Again, I want you to exercise caution. If any site offers "instant enlightenment" stay clear of them. There are unscrupulous groups everywhere and it most unfortunate that Buddhism is no exception. If it doesn't "feel right" to you, it probably isn't "right" for you.

                            I hope this is of some small assistance.

                            May all be at peace.

                            John
                             
                            As I am, so indeed are others;
                            as others are, so indeed am I.
                            Having thus identified self and others,
                            harm no one nor have them ever harmed.

                            (Sutta Nipata 705)



                            From: "rocammack@s6" <cammack@...>
                            To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 6:13:39 PM
                            Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism



                            John
                             
                            That's part of my trouble. I can't find anything round here  - the middle of the Argentina pampas  - to give me guidance.  This group is the best I can find so far.  Perhaps a sort of correspondence course might be a good idea.
                             
                            Robert
                            _._,___

                          • colourshimmer
                            Hi Robert, There are home study courses available here which are very good: http://www.nalandabodhi.org/study.onlinestudy.html You might also like to have a
                            Message 13 of 26 , Apr 24, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi Robert,

                              There are home study courses available here which are very good:

                              http://www.nalandabodhi.org/study.onlinestudy.html


                              You might also like to have a look at Buddhism Without Boundaries at our Study Links section as well as at the considerable resources in the various specialist forums there....especially in the Tibetan Buddhist forum:

                              http://www.buddhismwithoutboundaries.com/


                              Kind wishes,

                              CS








                              --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, "rocammack@..." <cammack@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > John
                              >
                              > That's part of my trouble. I can't find anything round here - the middle of the Argentina pampas - to give me guidance. This group is the best I can find so far. Perhaps a sort of correspondence course might be a good idea.
                              >
                              > Robert
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: John Pellecchia
                              > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 8:00 AM
                              > Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Good morning Louisa.
                              >
                              > As Colourshimmer stated the Tara practice is excellent. In fact, this was the first devotion that I practiced and still perform. Humm...I wonder if it's suitable to perform that practice without receiving an empowerment <smile>.
                              >
                              > I can certainly agree with the problem regarding finding a sangha to "round out" the Triple Gem. I don't think people realize the difficulties one faces in certain countries or areas of the USA. Buddhism is gaining a following and inroads but either there are few centers or they are well kept "secrets".
                              >
                              > As I stated, there are some centers that offer video taped lessons on the Internet but again, as Colourshimmer stated, some are a bit "dodgey" (you *have* to like UK terminology <smile>).
                              >
                              > I can certainly empathize with your statement, "Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings." It seems we are in a similar "boat". When I drive three-and-one-half hours to visit it takes me a while just to loosen up, I guess we'll just have to see how Buddhism progresses in our areas.
                              >
                              > I read somewhere that teachings by texts are being accepted as suitable in Western society by traditional Buddhist schools. It seems as though there is a recognition that there is a need in one respect but a hole in the other. I searched in my library but haven't been able to locate the exact quote or by whom it was said. Anyway, I'll take a book over nothing but even there I urge caution. It seems there are many instant Buddhist "experts" on the shelves of late.
                              >
                              > I hope you are well, Louisa, and happy that you are beginning your practice again.
                              >
                              > May all be at peace.
                              >
                              > John
                              >
                              > May all creatures, all living things,
                              > all beings one and all,
                              > experience good fortune only.
                              > May they not fall into harm.
                              >
                              > (Anguttara Nikaya II, 72)
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              > From: shellshucked <shellshucked@...>
                              > To: Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:56:03 AM
                              > Subject: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism
                              >
                              > John and CS,
                              >
                              > I appreciate your exchange. To clarify, I have studied for several years with a qualified teacher. However, I relocated to a different part of the country where there is not a center for miles around. Given a medical condition, it is impossible for me to travel for an entire day to attend teachings. I wish I could, but my circumstances would not allow it. So, I am left to gain whatever teachings I can from the internet and from books. I came to this sight because I needed the Third Jewel. Truly it is all I have by way of Sangha at this time. Really, I am doing my best given my conditions.
                              >
                              > Thankfully, since posting on this site, I've returned to daily refuge and Tara practice.
                              >
                              > Louisa
                              >
                            • rocammack@s6
                              Good afternoon John Many thanks for all your advice. My first encounter with Buddhism was a book by Soyen Shaku called Zen for Americans . Although I was
                              Message 14 of 26 , Apr 25, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Good afternoon John
                                 
                                Many thanks for all your advice. My first encounter with Buddhism was a book by Soyen Shaku called 'Zen for Americans'. Although I was brought up as a catholic I had become rather disillusioned with this faith and Shaku's book fitted in with ideas which I had been forming for some time.  Lately I came across a book by the Dalai Lama (in Spanish) which is called 'Expanding Love'. I started looking around on the Web and found this site which has been giving me a lot of support.
                                 
                                I had not realized that there were different forms of Buddhism so I am very happy to get your advice.
                                 
                                By the way, like Colourshimmer I am originally from the UK though I have lived for many years here in Argentina.
                                 
                                My good thoughts to you and Blessings
                                 
                                 
                                Robert
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Friday, April 24, 2009 2:42 AM
                                Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism

                                Good morning Robert.

                                I know exactly what you mean. As I said, most people don't realize the difficulties we experience in locating physical Sanghas in certain parts of the world. Yes, there are many sites on the Internet but you have to proceed with a degree of caution just as you would need to be cautious with certain so-called "Buddhist" groups (I'd prefer not to get into that topic in an open forum). There are many reputable sites and there are many that are not.

                                You may wish to try http://www.youtube. com and enter a search like "buddhism". Most of the teachings are general in nature and are rather short. I don't know what tradition or school you're drawn to so it's difficult to offer suggestions. But since this site is primarily dedicated to Tibetan Buddhism there are several sites I could suggest.

                                Colourshimmer gave three excellent sites:

                                http://www.rinpoche .com/

                                http://www.samyelin g.org/

                                http://www.kagyu. org/kagyulineage /buddhism/ index.php
                                 
                                 One reliable source for correspondence Buddhism in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition is The Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition at their Foundation Store ( http://www.fpmt. org/shop/ category. aspx?SID= 1&Category_ID= 28&AFID=17 ). They offer videos one may purchase compete with worksheets in pdf format, a cite you may pose questions about the module you're using, and even tests you may mail back for grading. If you decide to order their components, you may wish to inquire to make sure the CDs are compatible with players in South America (that's as technical as I can get in that area).

                                Another is http://www.namseban gdzo.com/ (affiliated with the kagyu.org site Colourshimmer posted) which offers many tapes and CDs on various Buddhist topics. You may also try http://pt.chagdud. org/en/akshobhya / which lists some centers founded by the late His Eminence Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche in South America (primarily in Brasil).

                                A while ago I had posted a database on this site of websites you may find of use (I hope the links are still active) and where one may get reliable information on the Internet from various traditions (see http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Buddhism_ 101/database? method=reportRow s&tbl=1 ). Unfortunately the URLs are not hyperlinks so you'll have to copy-and-paste.

                                Again, I want you to exercise caution. If any site offers "instant enlightenment" stay clear of them. There are unscrupulous groups everywhere and it most unfortunate that Buddhism is no exception. If it doesn't "feel right" to you, it probably isn't "right" for you.

                                I hope this is of some small assistance.

                                May all be at peace.

                                John
                                 
                                As I am, so indeed are others;
                                as others are, so indeed am I.
                                Having thus identified self and others,
                                harm no one nor have them ever harmed.

                                (Sutta Nipata 705)



                                From: "rocammack@s6" <cammack@coopenetluj an.com.ar>
                                To: Buddhism_101@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 6:13:39 PM
                                Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: New here, but not new to Buddhism



                                John
                                 
                                That's part of my trouble. I can't find anything round here  - the middle of the Argentina pampas  - to give me guidance.  This group is the best I can find so far.  Perhaps a sort of correspondence course might be a good idea.
                                 
                                Robert
                                _._,___

                              • Cittamani
                                Another possibility, This new book on Guru yoga by my precious heart -Lama of 33 years, Lama Zopa Rinpoche, Is an excellent place to start /end. The essence
                                Message 15 of 26 , Apr 27, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  Another possibility, This new book on Guru yoga by my precious heart -Lama of 33 years, Lama Zopa Rinpoche, Is an excellent place to start /end.  The essence of the vajrayana path is Guru yoga.

                                  Sarva mangalam,

                                  Tara

                                  --------------------------------

                                  http://www.snowlionpub.com/html/product_9932.html

                                  THE HEART OF THE PATH

                                  by Lama Zopa Rinpoche, ed. by Ailsa Cameron

                                  This comprehensive work on guru devotion, on why we need a guru and how it is the very essence of the path, is the result of over 50 different teachings Rinpoche has given over the past 3 decades and covers and explains the entire subject in great detail - including: the Importance of Devotion; the Realization of Guru Yoga; Who to Regard as Guru; How the Past Kagyu Lamas Practiced; What is Guru Yoga?; Six Session Guru Yoga; Calling the Lama from Afar; Is Absolute Obedience Required?; Checking the Guru; the Kindness of the Guru; etc.

                                  ------------------------
                                  ---  "rocammack@..." <cammack@...> wrote:

                                  >
                                  > Good afternoon John
                                  >
                                  > Many thanks for all your advice. My first encounter with Buddhism was a book by Soyen Shaku called 'Zen for Americans'. Although I was brought up as a catholic I had become rather disillusioned with this faith and Shaku's book fitted in with ideas which I had been forming for some time. Lately I came across a book by the Dalai Lama (in Spanish) which is called 'Expanding Love'. I started looking around on the Web and found this site which has been giving me a lot of support.
                                  >
                                  > I had not realized that there were different forms of Buddhism so I am very happy to get your advice.
                                  >
                                  > By the way, like Colourshimmer I am originally from the UK though I have lived for many years here in Argentina.
                                  >
                                  > My good thoughts to you and Blessings
                                  >

                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.