Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

9963wisdom from where? [was: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: Jesus was Buddhist!]

Expand Messages
  • ken
    Oct 2, 2008
      -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
      Hash: SHA1


      Thanks for that, John. (I've saved the quote off to my notes.) Here's
      another:

      "The ultimate view is to observe one's own mind,
      steadfastly and with determination.
      Buddhahood cannot be found outside,
      so contemplate your own mind.
      Behold and watch unborn awareness;
      how can common meditation match it?

      The ultimate guru is Buddha-mind within;
      do not seek elsewhere.
      All forms are nothing but mind.
      Recognizing one's true nature as Dharmakaya,
      swiftly actualize immanent Buddhahood. "

      - - Milarepa, in a song to Gampopa


      Sorry I don't have a more precise citation for it.



      On 10/02/2008 06:09 AM John Pellecchia wrote:
      >
      >
      > Good morning Bev,
      >
      > I tend to agree to a certain point with your comments. While these
      > discussions may seem to be an effort to support one's unique point of
      > view, however, there is a strong history and acceptance of debate and
      > discussion in Buddhism. We need to remember that the Buddha encouraged
      > discussion as a means of teaching the Dharma. The sutras in the
      > Tripataka are replete with this type of discourse in its record. This
      > is one aspect that makes Buddhism unique as a "religion" (a hotly
      > contested word usage among some Buddhists on various websites). We need
      > to remember the Buddha Shakyamuni encouraged thinking-out-of-the-box.
      > "Do not go by oral tradition, by lineage of teaching, by hearsay, by a
      > collection of texts, by logic, by inferential reasoning, by reasoned
      > cogitation, by the acceptance of a view after pondering it, by the
      > seeming competence of a speaker, or because you think, 'The ascetic is
      > our teacher.' But when you know for yourselves, 'These things are
      > unwholesome; these things are blamable; these things are censured by
      > the wise; these things, if undertaken and practiced, lead to harm and
      > suffering,' then you should abandon them." ("In the Buddha's Words"
      > edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi) I can only quote the words of the sutras or
      > those of greater knowledge than myself and extrapolate what I understand.
      >
      > If you follow the thread to its earliest source you'll find that it was
      > initiated to some degree by Bhikkhu Samahita (a Buddhist monk) who
      > postulated that Jesus
      > had been exposed to Buddhist concepts in the so-called "lost" years.
      > Again, I find that concept somewhat far fetched; to date in the
      > archaeological record there has been no evidence of Buddhism found in
      > Middle Eastern areas (other than the Silk Road area in present
      > day Afghanistan [see http://www.ess.uci.edu/~oliver/silk.html
      > <http://www.ess.uci.edu/~oliver/silk.html> ]) of which I am aware. At
      > the same time, I'm fully aware
      > that Buddhism has and will continue to adapt to the specific culture to
      > which it spreads, We see this in each of the Buddhist traditions in the
      > Far East: China, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, etc. People are apt to
      > insert their unique societal and cultural traditions into any practice
      > as it migrates.
      >
      > I, too, am somewhat concerned that there will be (perhaps "is" is more
      > accurate) a hybridization of Buddhism as it gains popularity in Western
      > cultures: that it will assimilate Judeo-Christian concepts into it's
      > structure.
      > I am reminded of the Vietnamese Zen monk Thich Nhat Hanh who states in
      > his book "Living Buddha, Living Christ" that he has incorporated "…on
      > the altar of my hermitage in France…statues of Buddhas and bodhisattvas
      > and also an image of Jesus Christ. I do not feel any conflict within me.
      > Instead I feel stronger because I have more than one root." Personally,
      > I find this somewhat contradictory but I look at the more subtle concept
      > and wonder what harm if any does it create.
      >
      > In regard to your inquiry that you "...have been asked...to join a group
      > that meets for a few hours a week. I would, but I'm not sure of protocol
      > for entering, talking, manners, etc. in a more formal setting. If
      > someone would be able to help me with this, I would be supremely
      > appreciative." A lot will depend upon the tradition that the group is
      > following. You're best to contact one of the group leaders and ask him
      > or her what is the protocol to which they adhere. Many groups have a
      > pamphlet available for newcomers that outlines their ceremony if any.
      > More formal groups may have a ceremony including prayers and
      > prostrations. If the group meets in a shrine room typically shoes are
      > removed before entering as a sign of respect. More informal groups may
      > have a text they are reading as a group followed by a discussion of how
      > the text relates to each of them. In any respect take advantage of the
      > offer. Don't allow your uncertainty to keep you from
      > attending what will probably be a positive experience. I hope this is of
      > some help.
      >
      > May all be at peace.
      >
      > John
      >
      > If for company you find a wise and prudent friend
      > who leads a good life,
      > you should, overcoming all impediments,
      > keep his company joyously and mindfully.
      > (The Dhammapada 22:328
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: "bjpnest@... <mailto:bjpnest%40aol.com>" <bjpnest@...
      > <mailto:bjpnest%40aol.com>>
      >
      > Dear Friends,
      > I have been reading this thread with interest. What comes across to me are
      > writers trying to explain their own beliefs and hoping to mesh or weave
      > them
      > into a universality. It will keep going around and around in circles
      > with no
      > concrete resolution as each tries to "promote" his or her own case. It is a
      > good thing that we do not all believe the same way. Having said that,
      > there are only so many ways we can say the same thing, as I am beginning to
      > understand these messages. We must agree to disagree since none of us
      > will ever
      > be able to positively say, "This is the answer." And is that so bad? I
      > think, Yes. Because it keeps us embroiled in mini debates that can not
      > be proved
      > or disproved. It keeps us from following the path we chose when we joined
      > this group. It keeps us from living NOW, in this moment. What cannot be
      > answered with any surety might be better left for a Koan or for our
      > personal
      > meditation. I am much more interested in hearing what members have been
      > through
      > with the general public or teachers or any experience as it pertains to the
      > here and now. I also have been sitting solitarily for a long time, but have
      > been asked if I'd like to join a group that meets for a few hours a week. I
      > would, but I'm not sure of protocol for entering, talking, manners, etc.
      > in a
      > more formal setting. If someone would be able to help me with this, I would
      > be supremely appreciative.
      > Bev
      >
      >
      -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
      Version: GnuPG v1.4.0 (GNU/Linux)

      iD8DBQFI5LBC8CeNiFrQkecRAnIRAJ9Da3cd6aQUYEPRoff7YSden/2CqgCfdhQb
      FHIWzPAg9TXA0qn1fi9i+Js=
      =8Lc9
      -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
    • Show all 26 messages in this topic