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8751Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: Path and World

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  • Thubten
    Sep 1, 2007
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      Thank you Ken. I am newly subscribed because I got so tired of the Usenet
      groups with sniping and fighting, etc. My name is Victoria and I took
      refuge with Ven. Robina Courtin at Land of Medicine Buddha in 2004. Before
      that, I did a lot of reading. Reading is nothing without the oral
      transmission, in my opinion. Refuge, retreat and a Lama are vital to me for
      practice. Lama Zopa Rinpoche is my Root Guru.

      My first empowerment was Medicine Buddha. Not high tantra, but the Tulku
      who gave me the initiation stressed that we love our books in America!
      Nothing wrong with them, but stressed how vital it is to have a qualified
      Lama, who holds their particular lineage. I study in the Gelug.

      I look forward to having interesting discussion here.

      warm regards,
      Victoria


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ken/" <klegshe@...>
      To: <Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2007 10:44 AM
      Subject: Re: [Buddhism_101] Re: Path and World


      > Hello, and welcome to all of the new members. As you
      > see, there are two Kens here. I, being the elder, use
      > a capitol K, and ken, being the smarter and more
      > humble, uses a small k.
      > I was a member of a tibetan sanga for several years
      > (Drikung Kaygu) and must say that having a bona fide
      > teacher is extremely important, and the companionship
      > of a close sangha helps a lot in your path.
      > If it is at all possible, find a sangha and call them
      > about beginner's classes. You will be surprised at how
      > accomodating they will be. Or, just drop in, most have
      > a websites that detail many of their offerings and
      > times.
      > Technically, to become a "Buddhist", it is required
      > that you take refuge in the three jewels(The Buddha,
      > the Dharma, and the Sangha). This can be done
      > privately within yourself, but is more enjoyable, in a
      > ceremony at a temple or center, headed by a qualified
      > Lama or teacher.
      >
      > Hope that helps a little,
      > Ken/
      >
      >
      > --- ken <gebser@...> wrote:
      >
      >>
      >> I'd agree with Kristin: there's a lot a person can
      >> learn just from books
      >> available at libraries and writings and audio
      >> available on the internet.
      >> (We're living in wonderful times, aren't we!)
      >>
      >> I'd add that access to Itunes isn't necessary; many
      >> webites have MP3
      >> (audio) files which can be played on most computers
      >> these days. If your
      >> computer has a sound card, then probably at most it
      >> just needs to be
      >> configured to work. If you've ever heard
      >> sounds/music/voices come out
      >> of your computer, then it's already configured. Of
      >> course you'll need
      >> to have either speakers or headphones hooked up.
      >> Just find an MP3 (or
      >> MPU or RAM) file and click on it.
      >>
      >> hth,
      >> ken
      >>
      >>
      >> On 08/31/2007 07:08 AM somebody named Kristin
      >> Ballantine wrote:
      >> > You can most definitely grow on your own. There
      >> are
      >> > many resources out there nowadays. If you have
      >> access
      >> > to Itunes, there are many free podcasts that have
      >> > Buddhist Dharma talks. Books, cd's, internet web
      >> > sites. One web sited I've found that is a
      >> "directory"
      >> > of resources is www.buddhanet.net.
      >> > If you can ever get to a center to meet other
      >> > Buddhists in your community, I highly encourage
      >> it. If
      >> > not, maybe take a short week-end/retreat for
      >> > yourself, go to a meditation workshop at Shambhala
      >> in
      >> > Colorado- I hear it's beautiful there. Or the
      >> Kripalu
      >> > Center also has Buddhist guest lecturer workshops
      >> > several times a year also.
      >> >
      >> > Hope this helps!
      >> > Kristin
      >> > --- theseitzies <lzx8ml@...> wrote:
      >> >
      >> >> Thanks to everyone with the positive input! It
      >> is
      >> >> nice to know
      >> >> that I am not missing the point....I'm just on
      >> the
      >> >> journey to find
      >> >> it and that if I don't give up, it will come in
      >> its
      >> >> own time.
      >> >>
      >> >> How important do you all feel it is to be part
      >> of
      >> >> a Buddhist
      >> >> group? Do you believe it is possible to grow as
      >> a
      >> >> Buddhist on ones
      >> >> own? We have a couple of Buddhist groups in my
      >> >> area, but I work 2nd
      >> >> shift making it to attend during the week. I try
      >> to
      >> >> spend any extra
      >> >> time I have with my husband, because I barely see
      >> >> him...so the
      >> >> weekends are out as well.
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> --- In Buddhism_101@yahoogroups.com, ken
      >> >> <gebser@...> wrote:
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Tracie,
      >> >>>
      >> >>> Welcome to this group.
      >> >>>
      >> >>> First I should admit that I don't consider
      >> myself
      >> >> a true Buddhist
      >> >>> either. I don't know that I'll ever (in this
      >> >> lifetime anyway) be
      >> >> a real
      >> >>> Buddhist... I'm just not that good of a person.
      >> >> It's more that I
      >> >> had
      >> >>> beliefs and found that those beliefs jived
      >> pretty
      >> >> good with what I
      >> >>> starting hearing and reading about Buddhism.
      >> The
      >> >> more Buddhism I
      >> >> read,
      >> >>> the more connections I found with what I already
      >> >> believed.
      >> >>> What I'm going to say here isn't necessarily
      >> >> doctrinaire
      >> >> Buddhism. But
      >> >>> then I've found that Buddhism is the least
      >> >> doctrinaire of any of
      >> >> the
      >> >>> major religions (and most minor ones) that I've
      >> >> learned about.
      >> >> I've
      >> >>> also found that there's many ways to understand
      >> >> something. So
      >> >> while
      >> >>> there might be another explanation to what I'll
      >> >> say, I don't think
      >> >> that
      >> >>> what I say is contrary to Buddhism.
      >> >>>
      >> >>>
      >> >>> A long time ago a Buddhist told me that in
      >> >> Buddhism there's said
      >> >> to be
      >> >>> many paths up the mountain. She meant that
      >> >> religions other than
      >> >>> Buddhism can lead you to where you want to be.
      >> >> But it's also true
      >> >> just
      >> >>> within Buddhism: there's not just one path, one
      >> >> and the same path,
      >> >> which
      >> >>> all Buddhists must take. There's many paths.
      >> >> Though it might not
      >> >> be
      >> >>> the easiest, but I believe you could even create
      >> >> your own path.
      >> >> Perhaps
      >> >>> in the end each of us must to some degree make
      >> our
      >> >> own path. So
      >> >> no one
      >> >>> has to worry about veering from "the path"
      >> >> because, in the end, it
      >> >> can
      >> >>> still lead up the mountain.
      >> >>>
      >> >>> In the same way, at least for me, the goal isn't
      >> >> to say, "I'm a
      >> >>> Buddhist." Frankly, that would be just too much
      >> >> pressure, too much
      >> >>> stress, both of which Buddhism tries to help me
      >> to
      >> >> avoid-- "avoid"
      >> >> in
      >> >>> the sense of dealing with life in a way that
      >> >> produces no stress or
      >> >>> pressure. So, quite ironically, not worrying
      >> >> about being a good
      >> >>> Buddhist or staying on some path, might be
      >> helping
      >> >> me to be a
      >> >> better
      >> >>> Buddhist, at least in one way.
      >> >>>
      >> >>> At the same time, the experience of stress and
      >> >> pressure can be
      >> >> helpful.
      >> >>> As Lao-tse says, "I make use of whatever comes
      >> my
      >> >> way." Since
      >> >> he's not
      >> >>> around to talk to, I can't ask him, but I
      >> believe
      >> >> Lao-tse would
      >> >> say,
      >> >>> "Yes, stress does frequently come our way and we
      >> >> can learn from
      >> >> it."
      >> >>> What I've tried to do with stress and pressure
      >> is
      >> >> to notice when
      >> >> I'm
      >> >>> feeling it-- the emphasis being on *notice*--
      >> and
      >> >> think about how
      >> >> it's
      >> >>> occurring, from whom or from where or from what
      >> is
      >> >> it
      >> >> originating. This
      >> >>> does two things: one is that, merely by noticing
      >> >> the stress, we
      >> >> distance
      >> >>> ourselves from that stress and so don't
      >> experience
      >> >> it immediately--
      >> >> that
      >> >>> is, we experience it mediated by our
      >> contemplation
      >> >> of it, sort of a
      >> >>> second-hand experience of stress, almost as if
      >> >> it's somebody else's
      >> >>> stress. Eventually, hopefully, that stress,
      >> that
      >> >> pressure, may
      >> >> become
      >> >>> the stress and pressure of the samsara world and
      >> >> only something we
      >> >>> observe from afar, detached from it by our
      >> >> noticing of it.
      >> >>> Also, by taking some time to notice stress, we
      >> >> become more
      >> >> sensitive to
      >> >>> it, we grow antennae, and learn to notice it
      >> >> sooner in its
      >> >> development.
      >> >>> If we notice it sooner, we have more of an
      >> >> opportunity to find a
      >> >> way to
      >> >>> defuse a situation before it becomes too
      >> intense.
      >> >> For example,
      >> >> being
      >> >>> around quite a few high intensity people over
      >> the
      >> >> years, I noticed
      >> >> that
      >> >>> they would do silly things when their stress
      >> level
      >> >> climbed too
      >> >> high. I
      >> >>> have a cousin who would quickly lose patience if
      >> >> he couldn't get
      >> >>> something to do what he wanted and end up
      >> smashing
      >> >> it. His life
      >> >> was a
      >> >>> history of smashed radios, computers, cars,
      >> >> motorcycles, pens,
      >> >> windows,
      >> >>> people, and even an airplane. None of this did
      >> >> him any good, in
      >> >> fact it
      >> >>> was more self-defeating than anything else.
      >> Once
      >> >> his stress level
      >> >> rose
      >> >>> too high, it was difficult to talk to him. By
      >> >> noticing it early, I
      >> >>> could say, "Let's try this..." or "I wonder if
      >> >> this would work."
      >> >> By
      >> >>> participating in what he was doing, yet in a
      >> calm
      >> >> way, by opening
      >> >> up
      >> >>> other options to doing something, and by
      >> >> encouraging more thought,
      >> >> all
      >> >>> or some of these would, most of the time, help
      >> him
      >> >> avoid stress and
      >> >>> bring some calm to the situation. Of course I
      >> had
      >> >> to learn to do
      >> >> this
      >> >>> myself, but my cousin, with his way of being in
      >> >> the world, helped
      >> >> me a
      >> >>> great deal to create calm for myself.
      >> >>>
      >> >>> And the word "create" is pivotal. Sometimes--
      >> >> often-- we want to
      >> >> *find*
      >> >>> calm. But in some situations it just isn't
      >> there
      >> >> to be found.
      >> >> Instead
      >>
      >>
      >> --
      >> Abstinence-Only sex education is a little like
      >> Just-Hold-It potty training.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
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