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Buddha’s virtues by Bhikkhu Khantipalo

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  • Antony Woods
    The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas, often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself or describes the nature of a faithful
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 8, 2006
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      "The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas,
      often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself
      or describes the nature of a faithful follower. These
      virtues seem, by reason of their unsystematic form, to go
      back to the time of oral tradition in the Buddha's days. Later
      lists of the Buddha's epithets are often more systematically
      arranged to illustrate the Buddha's great compassion, purity,
      and wisdom. These three qualities may be seen in the
      often repeated Namo tassa Bhagavato (compassion), Arahato
      (purity) Sammá Sambuddhassa (wisdom). The nine virtues
      to follow in fact expand upon and clarify these three.

      ARAHAM: The Accomplished Destroyer of Defilements
      This virtue shows stainless purity, true worth, and the
      accomplishment of the end, Nibbána. The Buddha is first
      named as an Arahat, as were his enlightened followers, since
      he is free from all defilements, without greed, hatred, and
      delusion, rid of ignorance and craving, having no "assets"
      that will lead to a future birth, knowing and seeing the real
      here and now.

      SAMMÁ SAMBUDDHO: A Buddha Perfected by Himself
      This emphasises the majesty of one who has awakened
      by wisdom to the truth found in his own heart and by his
      own labours. He owes his Enlightenment to none; it is not
      the work of a god granting it to him nor is he an enlightened
      messenger from on high, nor again an incarnation of some
      god. Born as a human being, he has gone beyond the limitations
      of humanity, and he declares that what he has done
      others too may do. They are not found frequently, these Fully
      Awakened Ones, and only when the heart of Dhamma is no
      longer known will one of them appear and awaken to Enlightenment
      after lives of preparation as a Bodhisatta.

      VIJJÁ-CARANA-SAMPANNO: Complete in Clear Knowledge
      and Compassionate Conduct
      Both wisdom and compassion have a part in this virtue,
      where balanced and developed to their highest degree they
      show the nature of a Buddha. Wisdom sees non-self, voidness,
      emptiness; compassion sees suffering beings blinded
      by ignorance and craving. Out of this seeming contradiction
      the very fruitful life of a Buddha is born.

      SUGATO: Supremely Good in Presence and in Destiny
      "His going was good" both in his life and at its end when
      he reached final Nibbána. His going forth in the world was
      out of compassion for people in their need for help, in sickness,
      due to defilements, or sometimes because of social
      oppression and injustice. The final going might be described
      as compassionate, showing as it did the way to others, or as
      wise, illustrating the way out of all conflict.

      LOKAVIDU: Knower of the Worlds
      This is a wisdom characteristic, the knowing through
      meditation and insight of the nature of all the various worlds.

      ANUTTARO PURISADAMMA-SÁRATHI: Incomparable
      Master of Those to be Tamed
      This virtue again is a balance of wisdom and compassion.
      Taming people is a hard business and we know that the
      Buddha had some tough customers. But he was successful
      even with very difficult people though of course, due to their
      different capacities, that taming did not lead to the same
      results for everyone.

      SATTHÁ DEVA-MANUSSÁNAM: Teacher of Devas and
      Humanity
      Most religious teachers will certainly be instructors of
      humanity but they are taught by whatever divine (deva) source
      they conceive. Through his wisdom the Buddha was the
      Teacher of both, answering not only questions put to him by
      human beings but those posed by the gods as well.

      BUDDHO: Awakened and Awakener
      This also shows the Buddha's wisdom leading to Awakening
      or Enlightenment, and his compassion as Awakener
      of others. There is an unavoidable overlapping of qualities
      here with Sammá Sambuddho.

      BHAGAVÁ: The Lord by Skilful Means Apportioning
      Dhamma
      This word seems to be related to the root bhaj, having
      the meaning of analysis, hence of wisdom, but the apportioning
      of Dhamma to others was done very skilfully and
      hence compassionately. It is customary to render this
      untranslatable word by "Lord" or "Exalted One," which of
      course in Buddhist usage does not imply belief in any supernatural
      being."
      From the Introduction to: Buddha my Refuge by Bhikkhu Khantipalo,
      Buddhist Publication Society, http://www.bps.lk
    • antony272b2
      The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas, often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself or describes the nature of a faithful
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 1, 2012
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        "The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas,
        often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself
        or describes the nature of a faithful follower. These
        virtues seem, by reason of their unsystematic form, to go
        back to the time of oral tradition in the Buddha's days. Later
        lists of the Buddha's epithets are often more systematically
        arranged to illustrate the Buddha's great compassion, purity,
        and wisdom. These three qualities may be seen in the
        often repeated Namo tassa Bhagavato (compassion), Arahato
        (purity) Sammá Sambuddhassa (wisdom). The nine virtues
        to follow in fact expand upon and clarify these three.

        ARAHAM: The Accomplished Destroyer of Defilements
        This virtue shows stainless purity, true worth, and the
        accomplishment of the end, Nibbána. The Buddha is first
        named as an Arahat, as were his enlightened followers, since
        he is free from all defilements, without greed, hatred, and
        delusion, rid of ignorance and craving, having no "assets"
        that will lead to a future birth, knowing and seeing the real
        here and now.

        SAMMÁ SAMBUDDHO: A Buddha Perfected by Himself
        This emphasises the majesty of one who has awakened
        by wisdom to the truth found in his own heart and by his
        own labours. He owes his Enlightenment to none; it is not
        the work of a god granting it to him nor is he an enlightened
        messenger from on high, nor again an incarnation of some
        god. Born as a human being, he has gone beyond the limitations
        of humanity, and he declares that what he has done
        others too may do. They are not found frequently, these Fully
        Awakened Ones, and only when the heart of Dhamma is no
        longer known will one of them appear and awaken to Enlightenment
        after lives of preparation as a Bodhisatta.

        VIJJÁ-CARANA-SAMPANNO: Complete in Clear Knowledge
        and Compassionate Conduct
        Both wisdom and compassion have a part in this virtue,
        where balanced and developed to their highest degree they
        show the nature of a Buddha. Wisdom sees non-self, voidness,
        emptiness; compassion sees suffering beings blinded
        by ignorance and craving. Out of this seeming contradiction
        the very fruitful life of a Buddha is born.

        SUGATO: Supremely Good in Presence and in Destiny
        "His going was good" both in his life and at its end when
        he reached final Nibbána. His going forth in the world was
        out of compassion for people in their need for help, in sickness,
        due to defilements, or sometimes because of social
        oppression and injustice. The final going might be described
        as compassionate, showing as it did the way to others, or as
        wise, illustrating the way out of all conflict.

        LOKAVIDU: Knower of the Worlds
        This is a wisdom characteristic, the knowing through
        meditation and insight of the nature of all the various worlds.

        ANUTTARO PURISADAMMA-SÁRATHI: Incomparable
        Master of Those to be Tamed
        This virtue again is a balance of wisdom and compassion.
        Taming people is a hard business and we know that the
        Buddha had some tough customers. But he was successful
        even with very difficult people though of course, due to their
        different capacities, that taming did not lead to the same
        results for everyone.

        SATTHÁ DEVA-MANUSSÁNAM: Teacher of Devas and
        Humanity
        Most religious teachers will certainly be instructors of
        humanity but they are taught by whatever divine (deva) source
        they conceive. Through his wisdom the Buddha was the
        Teacher of both, answering not only questions put to him by
        human beings but those posed by the gods as well.

        BUDDHO: Awakened and Awakener
        This also shows the Buddha's wisdom leading to Awakening
        or Enlightenment, and his compassion as Awakener
        of others. There is an unavoidable overlapping of qualities
        here with Sammá Sambuddho.

        BHAGAVÁ: The Lord by Skilful Means Apportioning
        Dhamma
        This word seems to be related to the root bhaj, having
        the meaning of analysis, hence of wisdom, but the apportioning
        of Dhamma to others was done very skilfully and
        hence compassionately. It is customary to render this
        untranslatable word by "Lord" or "Exalted One," which of
        course in Buddhist usage does not imply belief in any supernatural
        being."
        From the Introduction to: Buddha my Refuge by Bhikkhu Khantipalo,
        Buddhist Publication Society, http://www.bps.lk

        With metta / Antony.
      • antony272b2
        The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas, often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself or describes the nature of a faithful
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 12, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          "The Buddha-virtues are commonly repeated in the suttas, often in passages where the Buddha speaks about himself or describes the nature of a faithful follower. These virtues seem, by reason of their unsystematic form, to go back to the time of oral tradition in the Buddha's days. Later lists of the Buddha's epithets are often more systematically arranged to illustrate the Buddha's great compassion, purity, and wisdom. These three qualities may be seen in the often repeated Namo tassa Bhagavato (compassion), Arahato (purity) Sammá Sambuddhassa (wisdom). The nine virtues to follow in fact expand upon and clarify these three.

          ARAHAM: The Accomplished Destroyer of Defilements
          This virtue shows stainless purity, true worth, and the accomplishment of the end, Nibbána. The Buddha is first named as an Arahat, as were his enlightened followers, since he is free from all defilements, without greed, hatred, and delusion, rid of ignorance and craving, having no "assets" that will lead to a future birth, knowing and seeing the real here and now.

          SAMMÁ SAMBUDDHO: A Buddha Perfected by Himself
          This emphasises the majesty of one who has awakened by wisdom to the truth found in his own heart and by his own labours. He owes his Enlightenment to none; it is not the work of a god granting it to him nor is he an enlightened messenger from on high, nor again an incarnation of some god. Born as a human being, he has gone beyond the limitations of humanity, and he declares that what he has done others too may do. They are not found frequently, these Fully Awakened Ones, and only when the heart of Dhamma is no longer known will one of them appear and awaken to Enlightenment after lives of preparation as a Bodhisatta.

          VIJJÁ-CARANA-SAMPANNO: Complete in Clear Knowledge and Compassionate Conduct
          Both wisdom and compassion have a part in this virtue, where balanced and developed to their highest degree they show the nature of a Buddha. Wisdom sees non-self, voidness, emptiness; compassion sees suffering beings blinded by ignorance and craving. Out of this seeming contradiction the very fruitful life of a Buddha is born.

          SUGATO: Supremely Good in Presence and in Destiny
          "His going was good" both in his life and at its end when he reached final Nibbána. His going forth in the world was out of compassion for people in their need for help, in sickness, due to defilements, or sometimes because of social oppression and injustice. The final going might be described as compassionate, showing as it did the way to others, or as wise, illustrating the way out of all conflict.

          LOKAVIDU: Knower of the Worlds
          This is a wisdom characteristic, the knowing through meditation and insight of the nature of all the various worlds.

          ANUTTARO PURISADAMMA-SÁRATHI: Incomparable Master of Those to be Tamed
          This virtue again is a balance of wisdom and compassion. Taming people is a hard business and we know that the Buddha had some tough customers. But he was successful even with very difficult people though of course, due to their different capacities, that taming did not lead to the same results for everyone.

          SATTHÁ DEVA-MANUSSÁNAM: Teacher of Devas and Humanity
          Most religious teachers will certainly be instructors of humanity but they are taught by whatever divine (deva) source they conceive. Through his wisdom the Buddha was the Teacher of both, answering not only questions put to him by human beings but those posed by the gods as well.

          BUDDHO: Awakened and Awakener
          This also shows the Buddha's wisdom leading to Awakening or Enlightenment, and his compassion as Awakener of others. There is an unavoidable overlapping of qualities here with Sammá Sambuddho.

          BHAGAVÁ: The Lord by Skilful Means Apportioning Dhamma
          This word seems to be related to the root bhaj, having the meaning of analysis, hence of wisdom, but the apportioning of Dhamma to others was done very skilfully and hence compassionately. It is customary to render this untranslatable word by "Lord" or "Exalted One," which of course in Buddhist usage does not imply belief in any supernatural being."

          From the Introduction to: Buddha my Refuge by Bhikkhu Khantipalo, Buddhist Publication Society, http://www.bps.lk

          With metta / Antony.
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