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The Four Supreme Efforts Part II

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  • Sharon
    The four supreme efforts are, in the first place, the avoiding of unwholesome, unskillful thought processes. If we look at them as unskillful, we can accept
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2003
      "The four supreme efforts are, in the first place, the avoiding of
      unwholesome, unskillful thought processes. If we look at them as
      unskillful, we can accept the fact of learning a new skill more
      easily. Avoiding means we do not let certain thoughts arise, neither
      reactions to moods, nor to outside triggers. If we find ourselves
      habitually reacting in the same way to the same kind of situation, we
      may be forced to avoid such situations, so that we can finally gain
      the insight which needs to be culled from it. While we are reacting
      to a situation or mood, we can't assess it dispassionately, because
      our reactions overpowers the mind. . .

      ~ Ayya Khema, "(To Be Seen) Here and Now" section entitled "Supreme
      Efforts"

      This transcript can be found in its entirety at:
      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/modern/khema/herenow.html


      May this be of benefit.
    • philofillet
      Thanks for this, Sharon. I think I m making good progress about avoiding or at least letting go unskillful thoughts, but I want to think more about encouraging
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2003
        Thanks for this, Sharon.
        I think I'm making good progress about avoiding or at least letting
        go unskillful thoughts, but I want to think more about encouraging
        and maintain the good ones. Got an 8 hour teaching day starting right
        now during which to practice it!
        Bye
        Phil
        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...> wrote:
        > "The four supreme efforts are, in the first place, the avoiding of
        > unwholesome, unskillful thought processes. If we look at them as
        > unskillful, we can accept the fact of learning a new skill more
        > easily. Avoiding means we do not let certain thoughts arise,
        neither
        > reactions to moods, nor to outside triggers. If we find ourselves
        > habitually reacting in the same way to the same kind of situation,
        we
        > may be forced to avoid such situations, so that we can finally gain
        > the insight which needs to be culled from it. While we are reacting
        > to a situation or mood, we can't assess it dispassionately, because
        > our reactions overpowers the mind. . .
        >
        > ~ Ayya Khema, "(To Be Seen) Here and Now" section entitled "Supreme
        > Efforts"
        >
        > This transcript can be found in its entirety at:
        > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/modern/khema/herenow.html
        >
        >
        > May this be of benefit.
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