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Appreciative joy quotation (non-Buddhist)

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  • antony272b2
    The kindest thing you can do for the people you care about is to become a happy, joyous person. ~ From: Great Little Book on Personal Achievement by Brian
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 2014
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      "The kindest thing you can do
      for the people you care about
      is to become a happy, joyous person."
      ~ From: Great Little Book on Personal Achievement by Brian Tracy, Career
      Press, 1997

      With metta / Antony.
    • t.sastri
      Yes, when you are a happy, joyous person, everyone around you feel good. But that s just one half of the reality. How can you be happy & joyful all the time?
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 2, 2014
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        Yes, when you are a happy, joyous person, everyone around you feel good. But that's just one half of the reality.

        How can you be happy & joyful all the time?


        Tep

        ===

      • shar_63
        I think it s safe to say that (almost) nobody feels happy and joyful all of the time; and surely the purpose of mudita meditation (or any of the mental
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 2, 2014
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          I think it's safe to say that (almost) nobody feels happy and joyful all of the time; and surely the purpose of mudita meditation (or any of the mental cultivation meditations) is to continually move in that direction.  The cause and effect relationship still remains - people around us feel and often absorb the effects of our mind states.


          In a way, then, the quote here is encouragement to continue our mental cultivations, including mudita/(appreciative) joy, for the benefit of not only ourselves but the others around us.


          In lovingkindness,


          Sharon

        • t.sastri
          Yes, Sharon, the mudita practice complements metta and karuna development. The observation you made , people around us feel and often absorb the effects of
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 2, 2014
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            Yes, Sharon, the mudita practice complements metta and karuna development.

            The observation you made , "people around us feel and often absorb the effects of our mind states", is important. 


            1. Benefits of Metta Bhavana:

            Those who practice meditation must know metta bhāvanā: understand that a peaceful mind, that is secluded from sense objects, has the fire element (tejo dhātu) that radiates outward. When the citta is non-harmful with loving-kindness towards all beings, they will also be friendly towards us; similar to giving foods to people and they are grateful. Metta can win friendship even from those who are cruel.  Other cittas can sense our stream of metta radiation that is consistent day in and day out. Thus it is said that human has tejo dhatu radiated from the concentrated mind; when citta is calm, the four elements are evenly balanced and powerful. Samādhi bhāvanā that is earnestly developed such that the concentration becomes steady and unshakable can cure existing illness, given that the sickness is not yet beyond the curable state. 


            2. Benefits of Citta Bhāvanā:

            For those vipassanā meditators who have gained appanā samādhi, discernment will arise from citta bhāvanā.  Not only that such discernment is useful for finding a solution to any life problem, a great benefit of samādhi is the protection from illness and diseases. Especially, those meditators who have high blood pressure or diseases of the nervous system can be fully cured through citta bhāvanā and walking meditation. 

            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SariputtaDhamma/conversations/messages/23212


            Be well,

            Tep

            ===

          • antony272b2
            Hi Sharon, They are trying to start a study on comparing depression with ordinary sadness. But they re having trouble finding a control group who have never
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 2, 2014
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              Hi Sharon,

              They are trying to start a study on comparing depression with ordinary sadness. But they're having trouble finding a control group who have never been depressed!

              With metta / Antony.
            • t.sastri
              Hi Antony - Can you explain why so? Tep ===
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 3, 2014
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                Hi Antony -


                Can you explain why so?


                Tep

                ===

              • oldcolin
                Dear Tep, Antony and others on this great discussion group: One of the most inspiring teachings I have ever come across (and still refer to daily) is
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 3, 2014
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                  Dear Tep, Antony and others on this great discussion group:

                  One of the most inspiring teachings I have ever come across (and still refer to daily) is entitled..... Joy At Last To Know There Is No Happiness In The World, A Talk On The First Three Noble Truths. This is a powerful teaching by Ajahn Brahamavamso. I truly believe it has had a very powerful, positive impact on my life and my practice. I also think it provides a very understandable answer to your question to Antony, about why scientists find it so difficult to find humans who have never been depressed.

                  This great teaching can be found at http//www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha201.htm

                  Best wishes to all of you...may we all find the end of suffering soon....Colin



                  --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, <tepsastri@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Antony -
                  >
                  >
                  > Can you explain why so?
                  >
                  >
                  > Tep
                  > ===
                  >
                • t.sastri
                  Dear Colin, (+ Antony & Sharon) - You hit the big Buddhism nail on its head by saying this: may we all find the end of suffering soon. Indeed, I never find
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 3, 2014
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                    Dear Colin, (+ Antony & Sharon) -


                    You hit the big Buddhism nail on its head by saying this: 

                    "may we all find the end of suffering soon."

                    Indeed, I never find any knowledge/understanding more important than that of suffering(dukkha) and the end of it (dukkha-nirodha).

                    I am delighted to know that you have similar mind. 


                    Tep

                    ===

                  • t.sastri
                    Hi Colin, all - I have read the article (Dhamma talk) by Ajahn Brahmavamso with great appreciation. Allow me to give an excerpt that sums up the key ideas of
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 3, 2014
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                      Hi Colin, all -


                      I have read the article (Dhamma talk) by Ajahn Brahmavamso with great appreciation. Allow me to give an excerpt that sums up the key ideas of his (in my opinion).

                      .......


                      Excerpts from Ajahn Brahmavamso's "Joy At Last ..."   http://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha201.htm


                      1. "How many people do you know who are happy - really happy, really content? Not just people who say they are happy but people who really are happy. The only people I have ever seen in my forty-eight years of life who are happy are the Enlightened Ones (Arahants) whom I have had the good fortune to meet. Other than that, nobody When you understand this you understand the First Noble Truth, that the very nature of life is suffering, and you understand it in the very deepest of senses."

                      2. "You will find that when suffering arises, you have two options. You can either try to escape from the suffering or you can investigate it."

                      3. "The way of Buddhism is to investigate suffering, not to fight it. Because if you fight you will find that you just get more and more suffering. Instead, use wisdom power rather than will power."

                      4. "The thing to do when suffering arises is to investigate. To investigate means to watch and to observe in silence. You have to watch without interfering, without getting involved, because if you get involved you're not watching fully."

                      4. "By its very nature, sensory experience is going to be disappointing, and I know that if I ask for something the world can never give me, I will suffer. When I crave for something I cannot reach, I know I am just torturing myself more than necessary."

                      5. "The Third Noble Truth is letting go of craving. Contentment is the letting go of wanting something else. It is learning to be at peace with what you have."

                      6. "If you really let go, the whole problem just caves in - it fades and disappears. This is a beautiful moment of insight. Not insight based on thinking or theory, but insight based on experience."

                      7. "The Lord Buddha kept on saying that the five aggregates are suffering. ... All formations are suffering. If you see this, you get revulsion (nibbida) to these aggregates. Revulsion means that you see that the five aggregates are just a bunch of suffering. To really see it means that you get fed up, you get disinterested, you get repulsed from these five aggregates! "

                      8. "Jhanas are the highest happinesses you can experience until you let go completely and reach the attainment of cessation (nirodha samapatti) where there is no consciousness at all. The five aggregates just stop for a while. Once those five aggregates have stopped and you come out afterwards, you have to know - there's no other way - that consciousness is suffering, perception is suffering, feeling is suffering, the body is suffering, mental formations are suffering, birth is suffering, and life is suffering."

                      9. "Just apply the Third Noble Truth of letting go or the Fourth Noble Truth of the practices of morality (sila), sustained attention (samadhi) and wisdom (paññā). Keep precepts and you lessen suffering. Develop sustained attention, gentleness, persistence and stability of mind and you lessen suffering even more. Develop wisdom and you end suffering."

                      .......


                      Again, thanks for the sharing.


                      Tep

                      ===

                    • antony272b2
                      “In terms of concentration, the first step corresponds to giving rise to a nice pleasant state right here in the present moment. Can you do that? If you want
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 3, 2014
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                        “In terms of concentration, the first step corresponds to giving rise to a nice pleasant state right here in the present moment. Can you do that? If you want to, you can. As the Buddha said, all phenomena are rooted in desire. So how are you going to use desire to give rise to that pleasant state? You can adjust the breath. You can adjust your focus. Breathe in such a way that gives rise to a pleasant feeling in at least one part of the body.”

                        http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/meditations.html#imagine

                        From: Imagine by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


                        Also see:


                        Life Isn't Just Suffering by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

                        http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/lifeisnt.html


                        Happiness in samsara by Bhikkhu Pesala:

                        http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/buddhaviharas/conversations/messages/4575


                        With metta / Antony.

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