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Befriending the Breath by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (conclusion)

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  • antony272b2
    This is another way the breath can be your friend. It s like having a friend who reminds you when you get angry that it s not in your best interest to be
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 25, 2013
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      "This is another way the breath can be your friend. It's like having a friend who reminds you when you get angry that it's not in your best interest to be angry. It can soothe you when you're angry, put you in a better mood. It can be your friend when you're sick; it can be your friend when you're suffering from fear or any other strong, unpleasant emotion.

      The breath can be there as your friend, but only if you learn how to befriend it. Get to know it. As with any friendship, it takes time. You can't just walk in and shake hands and say "Hi, you're my breath, I'm in charge of you, let's go." The breath doesn't respond well to that, just as a person wouldn't respond well to some stranger coming up and saying that. After all, you've been a stranger to your breath for who knows how long. It has been there for you, but you haven't been there for it. You haven't paid it much attention. You don't really know it well. So here's your opportunity to get on good terms with the breath. When you have your breath as your friend, you have a friend wherever you go, in any situation.

      As the Buddha said, to really get to know someone requires (1) time and (2) being very observant. So. Here you've got a whole hour of time. It's up to you to be observant and to see how well you can get to know the breath. To show some goodwill for the breath in a very direct and visceral way like this is to show goodwill for yourself, the wish that's expressed in that chant: "May I be happy." Here's one way to act on it. At the same time, you cause no harm to anyone else. The way you breathe doesn't directly affect anyone else at all. Indirectly, if you breathe in unskillful ways and uncomfortable ways, you're going to get irritable and take it out on other people. But if you're breathing comfortably, there's no irritation to take out on anybody at all. In this way, the fact that you're working with your breath is a way of showing goodwill for other people too.

      So try to make the most of this opportunity."
      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/meditations4.html#befriending
      For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu

      With metta / Antony.
    • sharon werner
      I love this good friend goes with us everywhere. I can t tell you how often breath awareness has saved me from doing something unfortunate.
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 26, 2013
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        I love this good friend goes with us everywhere. I can't tell you how often breath awareness has saved me from doing something unfortunate.

        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
        >
        > "This is another way the breath can be your friend. It's like having a friend who reminds you when you get angry that it's not in your best interest to be angry. It can soothe you when you're angry, put you in a better mood. It can be your friend when you're sick; it can be your friend when you're suffering from fear or any other strong, unpleasant emotion.
        >
        > The breath can be there as your friend, but only if you learn how to befriend it. Get to know it. As with any friendship, it takes time. You can't just walk in and shake hands and say "Hi, you're my breath, I'm in charge of you, let's go." The breath doesn't respond well to that, just as a person wouldn't respond well to some stranger coming up and saying that. After all, you've been a stranger to your breath for who knows how long. It has been there for you, but you haven't been there for it. You haven't paid it much attention. You don't really know it well. So here's your opportunity to get on good terms with the breath. When you have your breath as your friend, you have a friend wherever you go, in any situation.
        >
        > As the Buddha said, to really get to know someone requires (1) time and (2) being very observant. So. Here you've got a whole hour of time. It's up to you to be observant and to see how well you can get to know the breath. To show some goodwill for the breath in a very direct and visceral way like this is to show goodwill for yourself, the wish that's expressed in that chant: "May I be happy." Here's one way to act on it. At the same time, you cause no harm to anyone else. The way you breathe doesn't directly affect anyone else at all. Indirectly, if you breathe in unskillful ways and uncomfortable ways, you're going to get irritable and take it out on other people. But if you're breathing comfortably, there's no irritation to take out on anybody at all. In this way, the fact that you're working with your breath is a way of showing goodwill for other people too.
        >
        > So try to make the most of this opportunity."
        > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/meditations4.html#befriending
        > For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu
        >
        > With metta / Antony.
        >
      • Colin Neal
        Dear Antony...... Thank you for this beautiful, very helpful teaching. With metta.....Colin
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 26, 2013
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          Dear Antony......
          Thank you for this beautiful, very helpful teaching.

          With metta.....Colin



          From: antony272b2 <antony272b@...>;
          To: <Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com>;
          Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Befriending the Breath by Thanissaro Bhikkhu (conclusion)
          Sent: Tue, Jun 25, 2013 10:30:11 AM

           

          "This is another way the breath can be your friend. It's like having a friend who reminds you when you get angry that it's not in your best interest to be angry. It can soothe you when you're angry, put you in a better mood. It can be your friend when you're sick; it can be your friend when you're suffering from fear or any other strong, unpleasant emotion.

          The breath can be there as your friend, but only if you learn how to befriend it. Get to know it. As with any friendship, it takes time. You can't just walk in and shake hands and say "Hi, you're my breath, I'm in charge of you, let's go." The breath doesn't respond well to that, just as a person wouldn't respond well to some stranger coming up and saying that. After all, you've been a stranger to your breath for who knows how long. It has been there for you, but you haven't been there for it. You haven't paid it much attention. You don't really know it well. So here's your opportunity to get on good terms with the breath. When you have your breath as your friend, you have a friend wherever you go, in any situation.

          As the Buddha said, to really get to know someone requires (1) time and (2) being very observant. So. Here you've got a whole hour of time. It's up to you to be observant and to see how well you can get to know the breath. To show some goodwill for the breath in a very direct and visceral way like this is to show goodwill for yourself, the wish that's expressed in that chant: "May I be happy." Here's one way to act on it. At the same time, you cause no harm to anyone else. The way you breathe doesn't directly affect anyone else at all. Indirectly, if you breathe in unskillful ways and uncomfortable ways, you're going to get irritable and take it out on other people. But if you're breathing comfortably, there's no irritation to take out on anybody at all. In this way, the fact that you're working with your breath is a way of showing goodwill for other people too.

          So try to make the most of this opportunity."
          http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/meditations4.html#befriending
          For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu

          With metta / Antony.

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