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Each Breath Something Helpful to Look Forward To

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  • antony272b2
    It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future. A metta phrase is
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 13, 2013
      It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future.

      A metta phrase is "May all beings have something helpful to confidently look forward to."

      Some people might say that you shouldn't be looking to the future but should focus on the present moment as the only place you will ever find happiness.

      I think these two views can be reconciled. In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!

      With metta / Antony.

      This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
    • Tep Sastri
      Hello Antony - You commented: In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 13, 2013
        Hello Antony -

        You commented: "In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!"

        I can see the direct benefit of inwardly restraining the mind in the here & now, since a mind that is not guarded will grasp pleasurable sense objects and cling to them; thus the unrestrained mind originates dukkha. With guarded mind, craving is abandoned.

        But it is not clear to me what might be any benefit of "looking forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind" !

        Regards,
        Tep
        ===
        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
        >
        > It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future.
        >
        > A metta phrase is "May all beings have something helpful to confidently look forward to."
        >
        > Some people might say that you shouldn't be looking to the future but should focus on the present moment as the only place you will ever find happiness.
        >
        > I think these two views can be reconciled. In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!
        >
        > With metta / Antony.
        >
        > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
        >
      • antony272b2
        Hi Tep, Thanks for the reply :) The term look forward to is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
          Hi Tep,

          Thanks for the reply :)

          The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.

          Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.

          With metta / Antony.

          --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Antony -
          >
          > You commented: "In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!"
          >
          > I can see the direct benefit of inwardly restraining the mind in the here & now, since a mind that is not guarded will grasp pleasurable sense objects and cling to them; thus the unrestrained mind originates dukkha. With guarded mind, craving is abandoned.
          >
          > But it is not clear to me what might be any benefit of "looking forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind" !
          >
          > Regards,
          > Tep
          > ===
          > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
          > >
          > > It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future.
          > >
          > > A metta phrase is "May all beings have something helpful to confidently look forward to."
          > >
          > > Some people might say that you shouldn't be looking to the future but should focus on the present moment as the only place you will ever find happiness.
          > >
          > > I think these two views can be reconciled. In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!
          > >
          > > With metta / Antony.
          > >
          > > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
          > >
          >
        • Tep Sastri
          Dear friend Antony, - There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person. Iti 4.11: Whoever ùwalking, standing, sitting,
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
            Dear friend Antony, -

            There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person.

            Iti 4.11: Whoever —walking, standing, sitting, or lying down — overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening.

            Be well,
            Tep
            ===
            --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Tep,
            >
            > Thanks for the reply :)
            >
            > The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.
            >
            > Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.
            >
            > With metta / Antony.
            >
            > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hello Antony -
            > >
            > > You commented: "In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!"
            > >
            > > I can see the direct benefit of inwardly restraining the mind in the here & now, since a mind that is not guarded will grasp pleasurable sense objects and cling to them; thus the unrestrained mind originates dukkha. With guarded mind, craving is abandoned.
            > >
            > > But it is not clear to me what might be any benefit of "looking forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind" !
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > > Tep
            > > ===
            > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future.
            > > >
            > > > A metta phrase is "May all beings have something helpful to confidently look forward to."
            > > >
            > > > Some people might say that you shouldn't be looking to the future but should focus on the present moment as the only place you will ever find happiness.
            > > >
            > > > I think these two views can be reconciled. In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!
            > > >
            > > > With metta / Antony.
            > > >
            > > > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
            > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • antony272b2
            The Buddha: But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 15, 2013
              The Buddha: "But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedfully. They develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.

              "Therefore you should train yourselves: 'We will dwell heedfully. We will develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.' That is how you should train yourselves."
              http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html
              From: Maranassati Sutta: Mindfulness of Death (1)
              Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
              For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu

              With metta / Antony.

              --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear friend Antony, -
              >
              > There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person.
              >
              > Iti 4.11: Whoever —walking, standing, sitting, or lying down — overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening.
              >
              > Be well,
              > Tep
              > ===
              > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Tep,
              > >
              > > Thanks for the reply :)
              > >
              > > The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.
              > >
              > > Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.
              > >
              > > With metta / Antony.
              > >
              > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hello Antony -
              > > >
              > > > You commented: "In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!"
              > > >
              > > > I can see the direct benefit of inwardly restraining the mind in the here & now, since a mind that is not guarded will grasp pleasurable sense objects and cling to them; thus the unrestrained mind originates dukkha. With guarded mind, craving is abandoned.
              > > >
              > > > But it is not clear to me what might be any benefit of "looking forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind" !
              > > >
              > > > Regards,
              > > > Tep
              > > > ===
              > > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > It seems to me that an essential component of happiness is having something helpful you are confidently looking forward to in the future.
              > > > >
              > > > > A metta phrase is "May all beings have something helpful to confidently look forward to."
              > > > >
              > > > > Some people might say that you shouldn't be looking to the future but should focus on the present moment as the only place you will ever find happiness.
              > > > >
              > > > > I think these two views can be reconciled. In breath meditation for example, one can look forward to the helpfulness of each breath to nourish the body and mind. This is something one can look forward to that arises immediately each moment for any living human being. One can look forward to each helpful breath of other people too!
              > > > >
              > > > > With metta / Antony.
              > > > >
              > > > > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
              > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Tep Sastri
              Dear Antony, - I have two questions for you to ponder: Is such thinking O, that I might live for the interval ... ...a great deal before or during the
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 16, 2013
                Dear Antony, -

                I have two questions for you to ponder:

                Is such thinking "O, that I might live for the interval ... ...a great deal" before or during the Anapanasat bhavana? Is the purpose of breath meditation for the "stilling of thought" or for proliferation of thought?

                Be well,
                Tep
                ===

                --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
                >
                > The Buddha: "But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedfully. They develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.
                >
                > "Therefore you should train yourselves: 'We will dwell heedfully. We will develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.' That is how you should train yourselves."
                > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html
                > From: Maranassati Sutta: Mindfulness of Death (1)
                > Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                > For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                >
                > With metta / Antony.
                >
                > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Dear friend Antony, -
                > >
                > > There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person.
                > >
                > > Iti 4.11: Whoever —walking, standing, sitting, or lying down — overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening.
                > >
                > > Be well,
                > > Tep
                > > ===
                > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Hi Tep,
                > > >
                > > > Thanks for the reply :)
                > > >
                > > > The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.
                > > >
                > > > Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.
                > > >
                > > > With metta / Antony.
                > > >
                <snipped>
              • antony272b2
                Dear Tep, I thought that there was thinking (vitakka) in the first jhana, in this case thinking about the next breath. With metta / Antony.
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 16, 2013
                  Dear Tep,

                  I thought that there was thinking (vitakka) in the first jhana, in this case thinking about the next breath.

                  With metta / Antony.

                  --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Antony, -
                  >
                  > I have two questions for you to ponder:
                  >
                  > Is such thinking "O, that I might live for the interval ... ...a great deal" before or during the Anapanasat bhavana? Is the purpose of breath meditation for the "stilling of thought" or for proliferation of thought?
                  >
                  > Be well,
                  > Tep
                  > ===
                  >
                  > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The Buddha: "But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedfully. They develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.
                  > >
                  > > "Therefore you should train yourselves: 'We will dwell heedfully. We will develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.' That is how you should train yourselves."
                  > > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html
                  > > From: Maranassati Sutta: Mindfulness of Death (1)
                  > > Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                  > > For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                  > >
                  > > With metta / Antony.
                  > >
                  > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Dear friend Antony, -
                  > > >
                  > > > There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person.
                  > > >
                  > > > Iti 4.11: Whoever —walking, standing, sitting, or lying down — overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening.
                  > > >
                  > > > Be well,
                  > > > Tep
                  > > > ===
                  > > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi Tep,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Thanks for the reply :)
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > With metta / Antony.
                  > > > >
                  > <snipped>
                  >
                • Tep Sastri
                  Dear Antony, others - ... T: Description of the first jhana is as follows: Quite withdrawn from sensual pleasures, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities,
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 17, 2013
                    Dear Antony, others -

                    >>T: Is the purpose of breath meditation for the "stilling of thought" or for proliferation of thought?

                    >A: I thought that there was thinking (vitakka) in the first jhana, in this case thinking about the next breath.

                    T: Description of the first jhana is as follows: "Quite withdrawn from sensual pleasures, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, the monk enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation."

                    After having been withdrawn from akusala dhammas (unskillful mental qualities) the remaining thought is "directed thought & evaluation" (vitakka-vicaara about kusala dhammas). It should be noted that in the second jhana even the skillful thought ceases; i.e. "stilling of thought".

                    So there is no thinking about the next breath when the Anapanasati is working!

                    Be well,
                    Tep
                    ===

                    --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Tep,
                    >
                    > I thought that there was thinking (vitakka) in the first jhana, in this case thinking about the next breath.
                    >
                    > With metta / Antony.
                    >
                    > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Dear Antony, -
                    > >
                    > > I have two questions for you to ponder:
                    > >
                    > > Is such thinking "O, that I might live for the interval ... ...a great deal" before or during the Anapanasat bhavana? Is the purpose of breath meditation for the "stilling of thought" or for proliferation of thought?
                    > >
                    > > Be well,
                    > > Tep
                    > > ===
                    > >
                    > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > The Buddha: "But whoever develops mindfulness of death, thinking, 'O, that I might live for the interval that it takes to swallow having chewed up one morsel of food... for the interval that it takes to breathe out after breathing in, or to breathe in after breathing out, that I might attend to the Blessed One's instructions. I would have accomplished a great deal' — they are said to dwell heedfully. They develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.
                    > > >
                    > > > "Therefore you should train yourselves: 'We will dwell heedfully. We will develop mindfulness of death acutely for the sake of ending the effluents.' That is how you should train yourselves."
                    > > > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html
                    > > > From: Maranassati Sutta: Mindfulness of Death (1)
                    > > > Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                    > > > For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and Thanissaro Bhikkhu
                    > > >
                    > > > With metta / Antony.
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Dear friend Antony, -
                    > > > >
                    > > > > There is no room for hope and thought in the present moment of a self-awakened person.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Iti 4.11: Whoever —walking, standing, sitting, or lying down — overcomes thought, delighting in the stilling of thought: he's capable, a monk like this, of touching superlative self-awakening.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Be well,
                    > > > > Tep
                    > > > > ===
                    > > > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Hi Tep,
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Thanks for the reply :)
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > The term "look forward to" is evocative for me beyond the technical category of future time. For me having nothing to look forward to is a sad emotion in the present moment. Having the breath to look forward to is ideal as it arises immediately each moment.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Some teachers say that the in-and-out breath is the First Noble Truth. Again the word breath is evocative for me approaching the supramundane refreshment of jhana. See my Refreshing-Breathing group.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > With metta / Antony.
                    > > > > >
                    > > <snipped>
                    > >
                    >
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