Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

4BVs Transformative Spaces to Dwell or to Work (Ajahn Munindo)

Expand Messages
  • antony272b2
    If we talk about our path as a Way of Transformation then we can have a feeling that our practice includes all aspects of our lives. Everything that happens
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      "If we talk about our path as a Way of Transformation then we can have a feeling that our practice includes all aspects of our lives. Everything that happens is part of our spiritual work; everything is acknowledged, everything is received. I find this wonderful to contemplate...

      Now, what are the transformative spaces or transformative powers of the heart? As I said, there are many rooms, many places within ourselves where we can go to work. Today I want to bring into our awareness four of these, which are traditionally called the Four Divine Abidings (brahmaviharas). These Divine Abidings are just that; they're like four rooms or four spaces within ourselves in which we can dwell. We can also go there to work. And we do a particular kind of work in each of these four places.

      It's the same as if you're going to prepare some food. We used to have a novice here who was marvelous at making cheesecake; he did this in the kitchen because that's the space to do the work of making cheesecake. He didn't do it in the workshop; you do a different sort of work in the workshop. It's very helpful to know what sort of work to do in what sort of space.

      Let's consider these four spaces as opportunities that we have available. It is important that we appreciate that these spaces are already, potentially at least, there within us. For human beings the existence of these four spaces is a given. If we don't know how to enter them, well, that's something else. Talking about the divine abidings on this occasion is one way of encouraging us all to remember how to approach these doorways – to recognise, then open them and to go in."

      Excerpted from "We Have What We Need", a Dhamma talk by Ajahn Munindo

      Thanks to Sharon for posting this in December 2002.

      With metta / Antony.
    • antony272b2
      ... http://www.abuddhistlibrary.com/Buddhism/B%20-%20Theravada/Teachers/Ajaan%20Munindo/The%20Gift%20of%20Well%20Being/wehave.htm From We Have What We Need ,
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        More below:

        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
        >
        > "If we talk about our path as a Way of Transformation then we can have a feeling that our practice includes all aspects of our lives. Everything that happens is part of our spiritual work; everything is acknowledged, everything is received. I find this wonderful to contemplate...
        >
        > Now, what are the transformative spaces or transformative powers of the heart? As I said, there are many rooms, many places within ourselves where we can go to work. Today I want to bring into our awareness four of these, which are traditionally called the Four Divine Abidings (brahmaviharas). These Divine Abidings are just that; they're like four rooms or four spaces within ourselves in which we can dwell. We can also go there to work. And we do a particular kind of work in each of these four places.
        >
        > It's the same as if you're going to prepare some food. We used to have a novice here who was marvelous at making cheesecake; he did this in the kitchen because that's the space to do the work of making cheesecake. He didn't do it in the workshop; you do a different sort of work in the workshop. It's very helpful to know what sort of work to do in what sort of space.
        >
        > Let's consider these four spaces as opportunities that we have available. It is important that we appreciate that these spaces are already, potentially at least, there within us. For human beings the existence of these four spaces is a given. If we don't know how to enter them, well, that's something else. Talking about the divine abidings on this occasion is one way of encouraging us all to remember how to approach these doorways – to recognise, then open them and to go in."
        http://www.abuddhistlibrary.com/Buddhism/B%20-%20Theravada/Teachers/Ajaan%20Munindo/The%20Gift%20of%20Well%20Being/wehave.htm
        From "We Have What We Need", a Dhamma talk by Ajahn Munindo
        >
        > Thanks to Sharon for posting this in December 2002.
        >
        > With metta / Antony.
        >

        "Equanimity

        In this consideration of the powers of transformation that are called the Divine Abidings, we have spoken so far of these three: loving-kindness, compassion and empathetic joy. The fourth quality is equanimity, in Pali, upekkha. We need to give particular attention to this very important quality. Joy and love and well-wishing are heartfelt, energising and beautiful qualities. However, we can have a tremendous desire for beings to be well - yet they are not well. How do we meet that? Perhaps with confusion. We wish ourselves and others well, putting ourselves through many, often dramatic, efforts in pursuit of well-being. Despite our efforts, though, we sometimes find ourselves in a complete mess. Sadly, we often react with, "It shouldn't be this way. I'm a decent character, it shouldn't be like this."

        If I could give a personal example, I recently received a letter from someone, not a nice letter. I was disappointed and rather affected by this letter; it was a bit more than I could manage. I was disturbed, for several hours, until Evening Puja came along. I thought, "Well, I won't go to evening Puja, I'm too upset." But this isn't the right way, this isn't what I tell the other monks. So I went to Evening Puja, and sat there as we usually do. Before long I heard the thought, "It shouldn't be this way." At that point I spotted the problem: I was pushing away the struggle, the reality of it. And then with a sense of relief came the recognition, "Here we are again." This was the quality of equanimity. There is nothing wrong with saying 'should' or 'shouldn't': imagining how things could be otherwise is an aspect of our intelligence. The problem is our getting stuck and lost in imagining how things could be otherwise.

        The Buddha said that if we want to really work with confusion of this sort, we can go into the place in which there is an appreciation of the law of kamma. There are causes and effects; there are laws; there is a bigger picture. We have a meditation for accessing this transformative space so that we can meet confusion: "I am the owner of my kamma, heir to my kamma, born of my kamma, related to my kamma, abide supported by my kamma; whatever kamma, whatever intentional action I shall do, of that I shall be the heir." This is a valuable grounding contemplation. Of course, when we're terribly confused, it may not make much difference to start at that time thinking about these things. But that is also why we have the encouragement of these teachings, these suggestions: we are readying ourselves in preparation to recognise these doors, and eventually these rooms, so that when we are called to meet the raw condition, we know how to enter."
        http://www.abuddhistlibrary.com/Buddhism/B%20-%20Theravada/Teachers/Ajaan%20Munindo/The%20Gift%20of%20Well%20Being/wehave.htm

        With metta / Antony.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.