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Beneficial actions one easily could have done in the past

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  • antony272b2
    In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I ve regretted harmful
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 14, 2012
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      In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I've regretted harmful actions in the past but not beneficial actions that I could easily have done.

      In post #4601 I discovered the surprising scope of metta practice, defined as having forgotten to send metta to people who are suffering only to be taken by surprise when their plight comes through from modern communication.

      What are some possible meritorious actions that would have been easy to do? Apart from sending metta which is rather intangible, other positive meritorious actions could have included mettaful words and bodily actions. Taking the opportunity to thank others for their abundant offerings over the years can be expressed through e-mails, letters, phone calls, face-to-face or even better a hug!

      Missed opportunities can include mundane things like unexplored staple foods from the grocery store, first-aid breathing techniques and optimistically negotiating with practical phobias. At the office there were opportunities to "put one's flag up" when secretly struggling with a project or simply to point out that the emperor had no clothes.

      The missed opportunity that comes up for me is about when my neutral person was urgently asking about the bus timetable and I could have easily given him $20 for a taxi. Kindness to strangers requires that you "think on your feet".

      The term "with the benefit of hindsight" is often used to excuse not having done good things in the past, but in Buddhism it is indispensable in learning from one's mistakes. Imagining what in the future one would wish one had done now is another approach to generate the desire to set long-term precedents regarding beneficial actions in one's daily routine in 2012 AD.

      With metta / Antony.

      This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
    • antony272b2
      ... I found this list: B. Making merit: performing good deeds through the various means known as the three punnakiriya-vatthu (bases of meritorious action):
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 14, 2012
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        > In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action
        > are basically things not to do rather than things to do.

        I found this list:

        B. Making merit: performing good deeds through the various means known as the three punnakiriya-vatthu (bases of meritorious action):
        Dana-maya: making merit through sharing out material things.
        Sila-maya: making merit through virtuous conduct or moral behavior.
        Bhavana-maya: making merit through mind training, i.e., developing mental qualities and wisdom.

        Buddhists should also make an effort to perform these seven more specific kinds of merit, bringing the total to ten:
        Apacayana-maya: making merit through polite and modest conduct.
        Veyyavacca-maya: making merit through efforts to give practical help, offer service or do the common good.
        Pattidana-maya: making merit through involving others in doing good deeds.
        Pattanumodana-maya: making merit through rejoicing in the good deeds of others.
        Dhammassavana-maya: making merit through listening to the teachings and acquiring knowledge that is free of harm.
        Dhammadesana-maya: making merit through explaining the teachings and imparting knowledge that is beneficial.
        Ditthujukamma: making merit through correcting one's views, learning to see all things as they really are so that one attains Right View.
        (D.III.218; D.A.III.999)
        http://www.mahidol.ac.th/budsir/Part2_4.htm#20
        From: A Constitution for Living by Ven P.A. Payutto

        With metta / Antony.

        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
        >
        > In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I've regretted harmful actions in the past but not beneficial actions that I could easily have done.
        >
        > In post #4601 I discovered the surprising scope of metta practice, defined as having forgotten to send metta to people who are suffering only to be taken by surprise when their plight comes through from modern communication.
        >
        > What are some possible meritorious actions that would have been easy to do? Apart from sending metta which is rather intangible, other positive meritorious actions could have included mettaful words and bodily actions. Taking the opportunity to thank others for their abundant offerings over the years can be expressed through e-mails, letters, phone calls, face-to-face or even better a hug!
        >
        > Missed opportunities can include mundane things like unexplored staple foods from the grocery store, first-aid breathing techniques and optimistically negotiating with practical phobias. At the office there were opportunities to "put one's flag up" when secretly struggling with a project or simply to point out that the emperor had no clothes.
        >
        > The missed opportunity that comes up for me is about when my neutral person was urgently asking about the bus timetable and I could have easily given him $20 for a taxi. Kindness to strangers requires that you "think on your feet".
        >
        > The term "with the benefit of hindsight" is often used to excuse not having done good things in the past, but in Buddhism it is indispensable in learning from one's mistakes. Imagining what in the future one would wish one had done now is another approach to generate the desire to set long-term precedents regarding beneficial actions in one's daily routine in 2012 AD.
        >
        > With metta / Antony.
        >
        > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
        >
      • Tep Sastri
        Hi Antony, - By the ten bases of meritorious action do you mean 10 kusala-kamma-patha? There are 10 kusala kamma patha: Three wholesome bodily actions:
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 15, 2012
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          Hi Antony, -

          By "the ten bases of meritorious action" do you mean 10 kusala-kamma-patha?

          There are 10 kusala kamma patha:

          Three wholesome bodily actions: avoidance of killing, stealing and unlawful sexual intercourse.
          Four wholesome verbal actions: avoidance of lying, of slandering, of rude speech and of foolish babble; i.e. adhere to only true, conciliatory, mild, and wise speech.
          Three wholesome mental actions: unselfishness, good-will, right views.

          Regards,

          Tep
          ===

          --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
          >
          > In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I've regretted harmful actions in the past but not beneficial actions that I could easily have done.
          >
          > In post #4601 I discovered the surprising scope of metta practice, defined as having forgotten to send metta to people who are suffering only to be taken by surprise when their plight comes through from modern communication.
          >
          > What are some possible meritorious actions that would have been easy to do? Apart from sending metta which is rather intangible, other positive meritorious actions could have included mettaful words and bodily actions. Taking the opportunity to thank others for their abundant offerings over the years can be expressed through e-mails, letters, phone calls, face-to-face or even better a hug!
          >
          > Missed opportunities can include mundane things like unexplored staple foods from the grocery store, first-aid breathing techniques and optimistically negotiating with practical phobias. At the office there were opportunities to "put one's flag up" when secretly struggling with a project or simply to point out that the emperor had no clothes.
          >
          > The missed opportunity that comes up for me is about when my neutral person was urgently asking about the bus timetable and I could have easily given him $20 for a taxi. Kindness to strangers requires that you "think on your feet".
          >
          > The term "with the benefit of hindsight" is often used to excuse not having done good things in the past, but in Buddhism it is indispensable in learning from one's mistakes. Imagining what in the future one would wish one had done now is another approach to generate the desire to set long-term precedents regarding beneficial actions in one's daily routine in 2012 AD.
          >
          > With metta / Antony.
          >
          > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
          >
        • antony272b2
          Hi Tep, - ... Yes I think it should have been the ten bases of wholesome/skillful action . I translate slandering as tale-bearing or divisive speech as
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 16, 2012
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            Hi Tep, -

            --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Antony, -
            >
            > By "the ten bases of meritorious action" do you mean 10 kusala-kamma-patha?
            >
            > There are 10 kusala kamma patha:
            >
            > Three wholesome bodily actions: avoidance of killing, stealing and unlawful sexual intercourse.
            > Four wholesome verbal actions: avoidance of lying, of slandering, of rude speech and of foolish babble; i.e. adhere to only true, conciliatory, mild, and wise speech.
            > Three wholesome mental actions: unselfishness, good-will, right views.

            Yes I think it should have been "the ten bases of wholesome/skillful action".

            I translate slandering as "tale-bearing" or "divisive speech" as slander is false speech in the first place. I think that refraining from divisive speech is the most practical form of "oneness with others" that a meditator can aspire to:

            "Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord."
            http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sacca/sacca4/samma-vaca/index.html

            With metta / Antony.

            > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
            > >
            > > In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I've regretted harmful actions in the past but not beneficial actions that I could easily have done.
            > >
            > > In post #4601 I discovered the surprising scope of metta practice, defined as having forgotten to send metta to people who are suffering only to be taken by surprise when their plight comes through from modern communication.
            > >
            > > What are some possible meritorious actions that would have been easy to do? Apart from sending metta which is rather intangible, other positive meritorious actions could have included mettaful words and bodily actions. Taking the opportunity to thank others for their abundant offerings over the years can be expressed through e-mails, letters, phone calls, face-to-face or even better a hug!
            > >
            > > Missed opportunities can include mundane things like unexplored staple foods from the grocery store, first-aid breathing techniques and optimistically negotiating with practical phobias. At the office there were opportunities to "put one's flag up" when secretly struggling with a project or simply to point out that the emperor had no clothes.
            > >
            > > The missed opportunity that comes up for me is about when my neutral person was urgently asking about the bus timetable and I could have easily given him $20 for a taxi. Kindness to strangers requires that you "think on your feet".
            > >
            > > The term "with the benefit of hindsight" is often used to excuse not having done good things in the past, but in Buddhism it is indispensable in learning from one's mistakes. Imagining what in the future one would wish one had done now is another approach to generate the desire to set long-term precedents regarding beneficial actions in one's daily routine in 2012 AD.
            > >
            > > With metta / Antony.
            > >
            > > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
            > >
            >
          • Tep Sastri
            Hello Antony, - ... Concord or oneness ; harmony or unity are not known in politics. Underlying the divisive speech is, in my opinion, greed and ego. Be well,
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 17, 2012
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              Hello Antony, -

              You're right about divisive speech:

              >A: I translate slandering as "tale-bearing" or "divisive speech" as slander is false speech in the first place. I think that refraining from divisive speech is the most practical form of "oneness with others" that a meditator can aspire to ..".

              Concord or "oneness"; harmony or unity are not known in politics. Underlying the divisive speech is, in my opinion, greed and ego.

              Be well,

              Tep
              ===
              P.S. I deleted an earlier post because the wording was not clear.

              --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Tep, -
              >
              > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Tep Sastri" <tepsastri@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Antony, -
              > >
              > > By "the ten bases of meritorious action" do you mean 10 kusala-kamma-patha?
              > >
              > > There are 10 kusala kamma patha:
              > >
              > > Three wholesome bodily actions: avoidance of killing, stealing and unlawful sexual intercourse.
              > > Four wholesome verbal actions: avoidance of lying, of slandering, of rude speech and of foolish babble; i.e. adhere to only true, conciliatory, mild, and wise speech.
              > > Three wholesome mental actions: unselfishness, good-will, right views.
              >
              > Yes I think it should have been "the ten bases of wholesome/skillful action".
              >
              > I translate slandering as "tale-bearing" or "divisive speech" as slander is false speech in the first place. I think that refraining from divisive speech is the most practical form of "oneness with others" that a meditator can aspire to:
              >
              > "Abandoning divisive speech he abstains from divisive speech. What he has heard here he does not tell there to break those people apart from these people here. What he has heard there he does not tell here to break these people apart from those people there. Thus reconciling those who have broken apart or cementing those who are united, he loves concord, delights in concord, enjoys concord, speaks things that create concord."
              > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sacca/sacca4/samma-vaca/index.html
              >
              > With metta / Antony.
              >
              > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" <antony272b@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > In Theravada Buddhism the ten bases of meritorious action are basically things not to do rather than things to do. In my own practice I've regretted harmful actions in the past but not beneficial actions that I could easily have done.
              > > >
              > > > In post #4601 I discovered the surprising scope of metta practice, defined as having forgotten to send metta to people who are suffering only to be taken by surprise when their plight comes through from modern communication.
              > > >
              > > > What are some possible meritorious actions that would have been easy to do? Apart from sending metta which is rather intangible, other positive meritorious actions could have included mettaful words and bodily actions. Taking the opportunity to thank others for their abundant offerings over the years can be expressed through e-mails, letters, phone calls, face-to-face or even better a hug!
              > > >
              > > > Missed opportunities can include mundane things like unexplored staple foods from the grocery store, first-aid breathing techniques and optimistically negotiating with practical phobias. At the office there were opportunities to "put one's flag up" when secretly struggling with a project or simply to point out that the emperor had no clothes.
              > > >
              > > > The missed opportunity that comes up for me is about when my neutral person was urgently asking about the bus timetable and I could have easily given him $20 for a taxi. Kindness to strangers requires that you "think on your feet".
              > > >
              > > > The term "with the benefit of hindsight" is often used to excuse not having done good things in the past, but in Buddhism it is indispensable in learning from one's mistakes. Imagining what in the future one would wish one had done now is another approach to generate the desire to set long-term precedents regarding beneficial actions in one's daily routine in 2012 AD.
              > > >
              > > > With metta / Antony.
              > > >
              > > > This post is recorded in mp3 audio in our files section:
              > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/files/Posts_Read_Aloud/
              > > >
              > >
              >
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