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Compassion by Sharon Salzberg

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  • antony272b2
    ...mostly compassion is a fairly natural response to seeing suffering. It s because we don t tune into the suffering of a situation – somebody else is
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2010
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      "...mostly compassion is a fairly natural response to seeing suffering. It's because we don't tune into the suffering of a situation – somebody else is suffering and we're angry or we're hurt or afraid or we're busy – whatever it might be that we actually don't see someone's situation as suffering and then the compassion is hard to come by. But when we actually stop for a moment and we tune in on that level it tends to be easier.

      And the same with ourselves. You know, if we're filled with anger or filled with jealousy or filled with fear or filled with greed, and we call those states bad or wrong or terrible, then we will naturally feel a kind of aversion toward them. If we see them as suffering, then we will more naturally feel a kind of compassion for ourselves and so that's not as difficult as we might think. What's really key is being able to tune into the suffering."
      http://www.audiodharma.org/talks/SharonSalzberg.html
      From: Metta Practice Retreat Part 3 by Sharon Salzberg,
      Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City, California
      2nd November 2002

      With metta / Antony.
    • antony272b2
      ...mostly compassion is a fairly natural response to seeing suffering. It s because we don t tune into the suffering of a situation – somebody else is
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 4, 2013
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        "...mostly compassion is a fairly natural response to seeing suffering. It's because we don't tune into the suffering of a situation – somebody else is suffering and we're angry or we're hurt or afraid or we're busy – whatever it might be that we actually don't see someone's situation as suffering and then the compassion is hard to come by. But when we actually stop for a moment and we tune in on that level it tends to be easier.

        And the same with ourselves. You know, if we're filled with anger or filled with jealousy or filled with fear or filled with greed, and we call those states bad or wrong or terrible, then we will naturally feel a kind of aversion toward them. If we see them as suffering, then we will more naturally feel a kind of compassion for ourselves and so that's not as difficult as we might think. What's really key is being able to tune into the suffering."
        http://www.audiodharma.org/talks/SharonSalzberg.html
        From: Metta Practice Retreat Part 3 by Sharon Salzberg,
        Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City, California
        2nd November 2002

        With metta / Antony.
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