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True Detachment by M O'C Walshe

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  • antony272b2
    The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or not self is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 2, 2010
      "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
      From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society http://www.bps.lk

      Also see (public archives):
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/8WorldlyConcerns/message/148?var=0&l=1

      With metta / Antony.
    • James Mitchell
      Wow!  This is really so true and so important to consider!  Letting go of the self is not about becoming isolated and ultimately annihilated, it is about
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 3, 2010
        Wow!� This is really so true and so important to consider!� Letting go of the self is not about becoming isolated and ultimately annihilated, it is about becoming connected and eternal.� Thanks for sharing!
        Metta,
        James

        --- On Tue, 3/2/10, antony272b2 <antony272b@...> wrote:

        From: antony272b2 <antony272b@...>
        Subject: [Buddhaviharas] True Detachment by M O'C Walshe
        To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, March 2, 2010, 8:03 PM

        "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment' ... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love 'loving one's neighbor as oneself' can find full expression."
        From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society http://www.bps lk

        Also see (public archives):
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/8WorldlyConcerns/message/148?var=0&l=1

        With metta / Antony.
      • antony272b2
        The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or not self is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 4, 2011
          "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
          http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh275-p.html
          From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society

          Also see (public archives):
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/8WorldlyConcerns/message/148?var=0&l=1

          With metta / Antony.
        • antony272b2
          The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or not self is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 16, 2012
            "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
            http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh275-p.html#10Conclusion
            From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society

            With metta / Antony.
          • antony272b2
            The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or not self is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 18, 2013
              "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
              http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh275-p.html#10Conclusion
              From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society

              With metta / Antony.
            • Yawares Sastri
              Dear Antony, I must confess to you that I ll never be able to love my neighbors as myself..all I can do is be nice/friendly to them. I think it s so hard to
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 20, 2013
                Dear Antony,

                I must confess to you that I'll never be able to love my neighbors as myself..all I can do is be nice/friendly to them. I think it's so hard to practice Brahmavihara4 to the full strenght.

                Sincerely,
                yawares

                --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" wrote:
                >
                > "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
                > http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh275-p.html#10Conclusion
                > From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society
                >
                > With metta / Antony.
                >
              • antony272b2
                Dear Yawares, all, Walshe is comparing Buddhism and Christianity and puts love in quotation marks. Here is a Christian post that clarifies: Love....is not
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 20, 2013
                  Dear Yawares, all,

                  Walshe is comparing Buddhism and Christianity and puts 'love' in quotation marks. Here is a Christian post that clarifies:

                  "Love....is not so much emotion as a policy. It's a way of treating other people, rather than a way of feeling about them.

                  We can't always like our enemies, or our neighbors, for likes and dislikes are largely temperamental and beyond our control. But we can always love those whom we can't yet like: for loving them is a way of treating them. And who knows? Those whom we began by trying to love may end by succeeding in liking. So you see, love continually expands."

                  From: "Life Is For Loving", by Hugh Bishop, C.R. as broadcast on the BBC in the last week of September, 1960 and first published in 1961 by the Faith Press, London.

                  With metta / Antony.

                  --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Yawares Sastri" wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Antony,
                  >
                  > I must confess to you that I'll never be able to love my neighbors as myself..all I can do is be nice/friendly to them. I think it's so hard to practice Brahmavihara4 to the full strenght.
                  >
                  > Sincerely,
                  > yawares
                  >
                  > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "antony272b2" wrote:
                  > >
                  > > "The Buddhist doctrine of anatta or 'not self' is a difficult one even for some Buddhists to grasp, but if we think of it in the ethical sense of utter selflessness we can see its practical application. True 'detachment'... means being 'detached' not from other people's problems and sorrows (or indeed from those of the various other beings with which we share this life on earth), but from our own worldly impulses: sense-desires, greed for power and influence and self-assertion, anger and hatred. It is not only not incompatible with 'love': it is in fact the only way in which real love – loving one's neighbor as oneself – can find full expression."
                  > > http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh275-p.html#10Conclusion
                  > > From: "Buddhism and Christianity: a positive approach" by M O'C. Walshe, Wheel 275/276, Buddhist Publication Society
                  > >
                  > > With metta / Antony.
                  > >
                  >
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