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Ajahn Sumedho on Metta

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  • Sharon Werner
    At first metta needs to be something we radiate to ourselves, willing good to this being here, because this creature is the most significant one for us. Maybe
    Message 1 of 4 , May 18, 2009
      "At first metta needs to be something we radiate to ourselves, willing good to this being here,
      because this creature is the most significant one for us.
      Maybe we'd rather have metta for our mothers, or for some inspiring figure.
      It's easier sometimes to send goodwill to some wonderful person
      or to masses of people like Ethiopians or a billion Chinese.
      But we have to admit that, in this lifetime, this being is the most significant being for ourselves.
      This is the being that was born, that we are with all the time.
      So we admit that.
      It's not a selfish practice, metta for oneself; it's not for selfish gain, it's
      just the willingness to respect and to learn how live in the right way with
      these conditions."

      http://www.geocities.com/ekchew.geo/Peacehapiness.html#b
      From: Reflections on Metta by Ajahn Sumedho

      Originally posted by Antony.


      May this be of benefit.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • shar_63
      As a spiritually developing being, one has to really contemplate in one s own life how to develop the right relationship with people: with one s parents and
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 8, 2010
        "As a spiritually developing being, one has to really contemplate in
        one's own life how to develop the right relationship with people:
        with one's parents and relatives, friends, and with society. This
        includes the willingness to forgive any wrongs done, the willingness
        to completely let go. Even though emotionally these things might
        still be painful, we accept the pain. With the heart, now, we're
        willing to suffer, accept this unpleasant feeling in the heart. We
        learn how to bear with that, how to even welcome it, so it's no
        longer something that we dread or resent but something that we fully
        accept and embrace. So then, on the conventional level – of mother
        and father, husband, wife, children, friends, enemies, all this – we
        practise metta. We can radiate this quite intentionally in the sense
        of actually sitting and concentrating at the heart to radiate
        outwards goodwill, good thoughts."

        ~ Ajahn Sumedho, excerpted from the chapter "Reflections On Metta"
        from "Peace and Kindness"

        The entire document can be found online at:
        www.buddhamind.info/leftside/under/pubs.htm


        May this be of benefit.
      • shar_63
        With people whom we have a lot of resentment or bitterness towards, metta is a way of forgiving and reminding ourselves to let go of it. It s not dismissing
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 14, 2010
          "With people whom we have a lot of resentment or bitterness towards,
          metta is a way of forgiving and reminding ourselves to let go of it.
          It's not dismissing or suppressing, but a reflection in forgiving and
          letting go of the perception. Start perceiving these people with
          metta, rather than just being overwhelmed with bitterness and
          resentment. Even if you can't feel any real positive thing, metta
          needn't be all that magnificent. It can be just being patient and not
          making any kind of problem about it. It doesn't mean you like people
          who have been really rotten and unfair to you, or those whom you
          can't like. Yet you can be kind to them; you can forgive, you can do
          what is right and generous to them - even if you don't like them.

          "`Liking' is something else. To like somebody, you have to feel
          attracted. You don't like your enemies. If somebody wants to do you
          in, you're not going to want to be with them. If somebody wants to
          stab you, that perception isn't one that makes you like them. If
          somebody wants to do me in, I'd rather keep a distance; that's only
          natural. But then we can rise above the sensory reaction, towards
          metta, which is a way of being patient, forgiving, doing what is
          right to do, what is appropriate to that situation. If somebody whom
          I don't like comes in, and I start thinking, `I don't like you, and I
          don't like this and I don't like that,' then I'm creating something
          onto the scene, I'm getting caught up in a mood of aversion to them
          and being carried away with it. But if somebody comes in and I feel
          this impulse of dislike, I can be fully aware of it, not denying it;
          I can accept it without adding anything to it. Then I can do what is
          appropriate, what is kind or generous in this circumstance. That's
          from the cool mind, from the mind that is open, receptive, not caught
          up in selfish view. Sakkayaditthi will say, `You did this and you did
          that and you shouldn't have, and you should have, and you don't
          really like me, you never understood me .!' when sakkayaditthi rants
          away, don't trust that. Sakkayaditthi is totally untrustworthy."


          ~ Ajahn Sumedho, excerpted from the chapter "Reflections On Metta"
          from "Peace and Kindness"

          The entire document can be found online at:
          www.buddhamind.info/leftside/under/pubs.htm


          May this be of benefit.
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