Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

More on intentions as seeds (Bhikkhu Bodhi):

Expand Messages
  • Antony Woods
    Any particular phenomenon represents far more than is immediately visible even to a deeply probing inspection. A seed, for example, has a much greater
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      "Any particular phenomenon
      represents far more than is immediately visible
      even to a deeply probing inspection.
      A seed, for example, has a much greater significance
      than the grain of organic matter that meets the eye.
      On one side it collects into itself the entire history of the trees
      that went into its making;
      on the other it points beyond to the many potential trees
      locked up in its hull.
      Similarly the act of consciousness
      involved in taking refuge
      represents the crystallization of a vast network of forces
      extending backwards, forwards, and outwards in all directions.
      It simultaneously stands for the many lines of experience
      converging upon its formation
      out of the dim recesses of the past,
      and the potential for future lines of development
      barely adumbrated in its own immediate content.
      This applies equally to the act of taking refuge as a whole
      and to each of its constituting factors:
      both the whole and its parts must be seen as momentary concretions
      with a vast history, past and future, hidden from our sight.
      Therefore what emerges out of an analytical scrutiny of the refuge-act
      should be understood to be only a fraction
      of what the act implies by way of background and future evolution.
      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bodhi/wheel282.html
      From: Going for Refuge & Taking the Precepts
      By Bhikkhu Bodhi
      For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and
      the Buddhist Publication Society http://www.bps.lk

      From: Sharon (sharonwerner@...)
      Sent: Sunday, 31 August 2008 10:10:28 PM
      To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Gil Fronsdal on Metta‏

      "We all have the capacity for kindness, for love. We all the capacity
      for compassion, empathy; and it's important to develop that capacity
      that we have. We don't have to leave it to chance, that these things
      we all arise by accident. We kind of pray at night, you
      know, 'Please, tomorrow may I have some compassion or some
      kindness . . .' But we can actually do something to cultivate that
      and develop it. And one of the principles of Buddhist spirituality is
      that our intentions are like seeds. If you act and express any kind
      of intention, that seed will flower, will develop, will grow into a
      wonderful plant. If your intentions are mostly intentions of ill-
      will, of aggression, of self-loathing, then what you are actually
      doing is watering that seed of self-loathing and aggression -
      whatever it is - and it becomes more like a habit that we are more
      likely to do more in the future. If we cultivate and water the seeds
      of kindness, of love, then you are more likely to have those develop
      and mature in your life."

      ~ Gil Fronsdal, "Metta," audio dharma lecture
      Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City, California

      http://www.audiodharma.org/talks-gil.html

      May this be of benefit
    • antony272b2
      Any particular phenomenon represents far more than is immediately visible even to a deeply probing inspection. A seed, for example, has a much greater
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 12, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        "Any particular phenomenon
        represents far more than is immediately visible
        even to a deeply probing inspection.
        A seed, for example, has a much greater significance
        than the grain of organic matter that meets the eye.
        On one side it collects into itself the entire history of the trees
        that went into its making;
        on the other it points beyond to the many potential trees
        locked up in its hull.
        Similarly the act of consciousness
        involved in taking refuge
        represents the crystallization of a vast network of forces
        extending backwards, forwards, and outwards in all directions.
        It simultaneously stands for the many lines of experience
        converging upon its formation
        out of the dim recesses of the past,
        and the potential for future lines of development
        barely adumbrated in its own immediate content.
        This applies equally to the act of taking refuge as a whole
        and to each of its constituting factors:
        both the whole and its parts must be seen as momentary concretions
        with a vast history, past and future, hidden from our sight.
        Therefore what emerges out of an analytical scrutiny of the refuge-act
        should be understood to be only a fraction
        of what the act implies by way of background and future evolution.
        http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/bodhi/wheel282.html
        From: Going for Refuge & Taking the Precepts
        By Bhikkhu Bodhi
        For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and
        the Buddhist Publication Society http://www.bps.lk

        Also see:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Faith_In_Buddhism

        With metta / Antony

        From: Sharon (sharonwerner@...)
        To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Gil Fronsdal on Metta

        "We all have the capacity for kindness, for love. We all the capacity
        for compassion, empathy; and it's important to develop that capacity
        that we have. We don't have to leave it to chance, that these things
        we all arise by accident. We kind of pray at night, you
        know, 'Please, tomorrow may I have some compassion or some
        kindness . . .' But we can actually do something to cultivate that
        and develop it. And one of the principles of Buddhist spirituality is
        that our intentions are like seeds. If you act and express any kind
        of intention, that seed will flower, will develop, will grow into a
        wonderful plant. If your intentions are mostly intentions of ill-
        will, of aggression, of self-loathing, then what you are actually
        doing is watering that seed of self-loathing and aggression -
        whatever it is - and it becomes more like a habit that we are more
        likely to do more in the future. If we cultivate and water the seeds
        of kindness, of love, then you are more likely to have those develop
        and mature in your life."

        ~ Gil Fronsdal, "Metta," audio dharma lecture
        Insight Meditation Center, Redwood City, California

        http://www.audiodharma.org/talks-gil.html

        May this be of benefit
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.