Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Ajahn Sumedho on Metta/lovingkindness

Expand Messages
  • Sharon
    What often confuses us [in practicing Metta] is our idealistic concepts of what we should be; for example, some of you might think: I shouldn t want revenge
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      "What often confuses us [in practicing Metta] is our idealistic
      concepts of what we should be; for example, some of you might
      think: 'I shouldn't want revenge for the victimizers; Ajahn Sumedho
      says I should have metta for them!' and then you might feel, 'No, I
      can't include everyone; it's too hard. I can have metta for everyone
      else, but not that totally hateful person.' What can be done in that
      moment is to have metta for that very feeling; finding an attitude of
      kindness rather than criticism, knowing it for what it is, not
      indulging or repressing it but simply being patient with that
      particular state as it is in the present moment.

      "If we actually practice this, what is the result? In my experience,
      I find that I'm no longer making problems for myself around my faults
      and weaknesses, I'm not hating myself continuously for not being able
      to live up to my high ideals of what I should be. I'm able to bear
      with some of the emotions and reactions I have, rather than just
      being caught up in aversion to myself. When we do this, those
      negative reactions fade out. We are no longer making a karmic
      connection to them; we are letting them go rather than getting
      entangled in them, so there is a feeling of greater ease. We are
      developing a proper attitude toward ourselves."

      ~ Ajahn Sumedho, "Nothing is Left Out" from "Voices of Insight" (ed.
      Sharon Salzberg, Shambhala Publications, 1999),


      May this be of benefit.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.