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Ven. Ayya Khema - equanimity

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  • Sharon
    Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on understanding, above all on the realization that everything that takes place also passes away
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 29, 2007
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      "Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on
      understanding, above all on the realization that everything that
      takes place also passes away again. So what do I lose? The worst
      that can happen is the loss of my own life. But I'll lose that in
      any event - so what's all the excitement about? In general, the
      people who cause problems for us don't exactly want to kill us. They
      just want to confirm their own ego. But that's not our business;
      it's wholly and entirely theirs."

      ~ Ayya Khema, "Visible Here and Now: The Buddha's Teachings on the
      Rewards of Spiritual Practice," Shambhala Publications, Inc., 2001.
      (A translation of the Sammanaphala Sutta with commentary.)


      May this be of benefit.
    • Antony Woods
      Hi Sharon, Here s a quote from Thanissaro Bhikkhu on a similar theme to the Ayya Khema quote: Second, conviction insists on giving priority to your state of
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 29, 2007
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        Hi Sharon,

        Here's a quote from Thanissaro Bhikkhu on a similar theme to the Ayya
        Khema quote:

        "Second, conviction insists on giving priority to your state of mind
        above all else, for that's what shapes your intentions. This
        counteracts the corollary to the first delusion: "What if sticking to
        my principles makes it easier for people to do me harm?" This question
        is based ultimately on the delusion that life is our most precious
        possession. If that were true, it would be a pretty miserable
        possession, for it heads inexorably to death. Conviction views our
        life as precious only to the extent that it's used to develop the
        mind, for the mind — when developed — is something that no one, not
        even death, can harm."
        http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/fear.html
        From: Freedom from Fear
        By Thanissaro Bhikkhu
        For Free Distribution, as a gift of Dhamma, from Access to Insight and
        Thanissaro Bhikkhu

        To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
        From: sharonwerner@...
        Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2007 14:11:24 +0000
        Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Ven. Ayya Khema - equanimity

        "Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on
        understanding, above all on the realization that everything that
        takes place also passes away again. So what do I lose? The worst
        that can happen is the loss of my own life. But I'll lose that in
        any event - so what's all the excitement about? In general, the
        people who cause problems for us don't exactly want to kill us. They
        just want to confirm their own ego. But that's not our business;
        it's wholly and entirely theirs."

        ~ Ayya Khema, "Visible Here and Now: The Buddha's Teachings on the
        Rewards of Spiritual Practice," Shambhala Publications, Inc., 2001.
        (A translation of the Sammanaphala Sutta with commentary.)

        May this be of benefit.
      • Sharon
        Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including ourselves, brings the understanding that there s nothing in the world worth keeping, worth holding
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 17, 2008
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          "Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including
          ourselves, brings the understanding that there's nothing in the world
          worth keeping, worth holding onto. Insight releases one from that
          resistance to other people's viewpoints which can make life so
          immensely difficult. Other people have other viewpoints. The only
          answer to that is: 'May they live long and happily.' Attachment to
          one's viewpoint only shows that one hasn't yet grasped impermanence.
          When one sees constant change in everything, so that one can never
          really say 'I am this', then a first breakthrough into depth
          perception happens."

          ~ Ayya Khema, "Being Nobody, Going Nowhere: Meditations on the
          Buddhist Path", Wisdom Publications, 1987


          May this be of benefit.
        • Sharon
          Sympathetic joy is rightly understood when we see that there s no difference between people, that we re all a part of whatever is momentarily existing in the
          Message 4 of 12 , May 19, 2008
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            "Sympathetic joy is rightly understood when we see that there's no
            difference between people, that we're all a part of whatever is
            momentarily existing in the world. So if one of these parts
            experiences joy, then its joy has come into the world and we all have
            reason to share in it. The universal will replace the individual
            when we have experienced and tasted it in meditation. Our problems
            won't let up so long as we try to support and secure the 'me.' Only
            when we begin to put the universal over the individual and to see our
            purification as more important than the wish to have and get, will we
            find peace in our hearts."

            ~ Ayya Khema, "Visible Here and Now: The Buddha's Teachings on the
            Rewards of Spiritual Practice," Shambhala Publications, Inc., 2001.
            (A translation of the Sammanaphala Sutta with commentary.)


            May this be of benefit.
          • Sharon
            Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on understanding, above all on the realization that everything that takes place also passes away
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 13, 2008
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              "Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on
              understanding, above all on the realization that everything that
              takes place also passes away again. So what do I lose? The worst
              that can happen is the loss of my own life. But I'll lose that in
              any event - so what's all the excitement about?

              "In general, the people who cause problems for us don't exactly want to
              kill us. They just want to confirm their own ego. But that's not our
              business; it's wholly and entirely theirs."

              ~ Ayya Khema, "Visible Here and Now: The Buddha's Teachings on the
              Rewards of Spiritual Practice," Shambhala Publications, Inc., 2001.
              (A translation of the Sammanaphala Sutta with commentary.)


              May this be of benefit.
            • Sharon
              Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including ourselves, brings the understanding that there s nothing in the world worth keeping, worth holding
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 23, 2008
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                "Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including
                ourselves, brings the understanding that there's nothing in the world
                worth keeping, worth holding onto. Insight releases one from that
                resistance to other people's viewpoints which can make life so
                immensely difficult. Other people have other viewpoints. The only
                answer to that is: 'May they live long and happily.' Attachment to
                one's viewpoint only shows that one hasn't yet grasped impermanence.
                When one sees constant change in everything, so that one can never
                really say 'I am this', then a first breakthrough into depth
                perception happens."

                ~ Ayya Khema, "Being Nobody, Going Nowhere: Meditations on the
                Buddhist Path", Wisdom Publications, 1987

                May this be of benefit
              • Sharon
                Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on understanding, above all on the realization that everything that takes place also passes away
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 18, 2008
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                  "Since equanimity is a factor of enlightenment, it is based on
                  understanding, above all on the realization that everything that
                  takes place also passes away again. So what do I lose? The worst
                  that can happen is the loss of my own life. But I'll lose that in
                  any event - so what's all the excitement about?

                  "In general, the people who cause problems for us don't exactly want to
                  kill us. They just want to confirm their own ego. But that's not our
                  business; it's wholly and entirely theirs."

                  ~ Ayya Khema, "Visible Here and Now: The Buddha's Teachings on the
                  Rewards of Spiritual Practice," Shambhala Publications, Inc., 2001.
                  (A translation of the Sammanaphala Sutta with commentary.)


                  May this be of benefit.
                • Sharon
                  The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain, gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway towards equanimity.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 28, 2009
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                    "The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain,
                    gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway
                    towards equanimity. Equanimity is the highest of all emotions. It's
                    one of the seven factors of enlightenment, and we certainly will only
                    get it in its complete form if there has been enlightenment. But,
                    just as with the defilements we can work on them; we can also work on
                    equanimity. These eight give us an excellent opportunity to work on
                    our inner equanimity, which not only means not to get irate when
                    there is blame, but also not to get all excited when there is
                    praise. It means both. And not to get all upset when there is loss,
                    but not to get really high when there is gain. They are just
                    happening. We perfect this path toward equanimity, and they are very
                    worthwhile remembering because of that, because we all confront all
                    of them alternately in our lives again and again and again. And if
                    we haven't learned that there is a pathway to equanimity we will
                    respond to them in the old familiar way. I like it; I don't like
                    it. This one I'll have, this one I want to get rid of. As long as
                    we do that, we are guaranteed to be caught in samsara, the round of
                    birth and death, which actually means the round of duality."

                    ~ Ven. Ayya Khema


                    May this be of benefit.
                  • Sharon
                    Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including ourselves, brings the understanding that there s nothing in the world worth keeping, worth holding
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 6, 2009
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                      "Insight into the flux and flow of all phenomena, including
                      ourselves, brings the understanding that there's nothing in the world
                      worth keeping, worth holding onto. Insight releases one from that
                      resistance to other people's viewpoints which can make life so
                      immensely difficult. Other people have other viewpoints. The only
                      answer to that is: 'May they live long and happily.' Attachment to
                      one's viewpoint only shows that one hasn't yet grasped impermanence.
                      When one sees constant change in everything, so that one can never
                      really say 'I am this', then a first breakthrough into depth
                      perception happens."

                      ~ Ayya Khema, "Being Nobody, Going Nowhere: Meditations on the
                      Buddhist Path", Wisdom Publications, 1987

                      May this be of benefit
                    • shar_63
                      If you have ever read Don Quixote, you will remember that he was fighting windmills. Don Quixote believed himself to be a great warrior. He thought that every
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 23, 2009
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                        "If you have ever read Don Quixote, you will remember that he was
                        fighting windmills. Don Quixote believed himself to be a great
                        warrior. He thought that every windmill he came across was an enemy
                        and battled with it. That is exactly what we do within our hearts
                        and that is why this story has such an everlasting appeal. It tells
                        us about ourselves. . .

                        "What does it really mean to fight windmills? It means fighting
                        nothing important or real, just imaginary enemies and battles--
                        trifling matters that we build into something solid and formidable.
                        We say, 'I can't stand that,' and we start fighting; 'I don't like
                        him,' and a battle ensues; 'I feel so unhappy,' and an inner war
                        rages. We hardly ever know what we are so unhappy about. The
                        weather? Food? People? Work? Leisure? The country? Anything at
                        all will do. . . Few of us come to see that the windmills we tilt
                        against are imaginary, that they will vanish if we do not endow them
                        with strength and importance, that we can open our hearts without
                        fear and gently, gradually let go of our preconceived notions and
                        opinions, our views and ideas, our habits and reactions. When all
                        that fades away, what do we have left? A large, open space that we
                        can fill with whatever we like. If we are wise, we will fill it with
                        love, compassion, and equanimity. Then there is nothing left to
                        fight."

                        ~ Ayya Khema, "Be an Island: The Buddhist Practice of Inner Peace"
                        Wisdom Publications, 1999, chapter entitled "Harmonious Living"


                        May this be of benefit.
                      • shar_63
                        The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain, gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway towards equanimity.
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 21, 2010
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                          "The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain,
                          gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway
                          towards equanimity. Equanimity is the highest of all emotions. It's
                          one of the seven factors of enlightenment, and we certainly will only
                          get it in its complete form if there has been enlightenment. But,
                          just as with the defilements we can work on them; we can also work on
                          equanimity. These eight give us an excellent opportunity to work on
                          our inner equanimity, which not only means not to get irate when
                          there is blame, but also not to get all excited when there is
                          praise. It means both. And not to get all upset when there is loss,
                          but not to get really high when there is gain. They are just
                          happening. We perfect this path toward equanimity, and they are very
                          worthwhile remembering because of that, because we all confront all
                          of them alternately in our lives again and again and again. And if
                          we haven't learned that there is a pathway to equanimity we will
                          respond to them in the old familiar way. I like it; I don't like
                          it. This one I'll have, this one I want to get rid of. As long as
                          we do that, we are guaranteed to be caught in samsara, the round of
                          birth and death, which actually means the round of duality."

                          ~ Ayya Khema, online lecture

                          (Originally found at http://watthai.net/sounds.htm)
                        • shar_63
                          The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain, gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway towards equanimity.
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jul 7, 2010
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                            "The Buddha mentioned [the eight worldly dharmas - pleasure and pain,
                            gain and loss, praise and blame, fame and disrepute] as a pathway
                            towards equanimity. Equanimity is the highest of all emotions. It's
                            one of the seven factors of enlightenment, and we certainly will only
                            get it in its complete form if there has been enlightenment. But,
                            just as with the defilements we can work on them; we can also work on
                            equanimity. These eight give us an excellent opportunity to work on
                            our inner equanimity, which not only means not to get irate when
                            there is blame, but also not to get all excited when there is
                            praise. It means both. And not to get all upset when there is loss,
                            but not to get really high when there is gain. They are just
                            happening. We perfect this path toward equanimity, and they are very
                            worthwhile remembering because of that, because we all confront all
                            of them alternately in our lives again and again and again. And if
                            we haven't learned that there is a pathway to equanimity we will
                            respond to them in the old familiar way. I like it; I don't like
                            it. This one I'll have, this one I want to get rid of. As long as
                            we do that, we are guaranteed to be caught in samsara, the round of
                            birth and death, which actually means the round of duality."

                            ~ Ayya Khema, online lecture
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