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Joy

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  • Sharon <shar_63@hotmail.com>
    [Sympathetic joy] is a sure antidote for depression. Anybody who suffers from depression is suffering from the lack of joy with others, the lack of
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 16, 2002
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      "[Sympathetic joy] is a sure antidote for depression. Anybody who
      suffers from depression is suffering from the lack of joy with
      others, the lack of sympathetic joy. One cannot always have joyful
      occasions, joyful thoughts in one's own life, but if one has joy with
      other people one can surely find something to be happy about."

      ". . . Joy with others is also good kamma-making. I was in a little
      village once where there was a special bell attached to the temple.
      Whenever anyone in that village had some good fortune, they would go
      and ring that bell. If the harvest was brought in, or the daughter
      got married, if someone came back from the hospital, or a good
      business deal had been arranged, if the roof had been reshingled,
      anything at all that gave them joy. When the bell was rung everybody
      would come out, look in the direction of the person who was ringing
      the bell and say, "Well done! Well done!" The one who was ringing
      the bell was making good kamma by making it possible for others to
      share his joy. The others were making good kamma by sharing
      another's joy."

      ~ Ayya Khema, "Being Nobody, Going Nowhere: Meditations on the
      Buddhist Path", Wisdom Publications, 1987
    • philofillet <bunnyboo@jcom.home.ne.jp>
      The Sharon Salzberg quote on happiness here and now catures the appeal of Buddhism so nicely. I guess her use of happiness is synonymous with joy but in
      Message 2 of 22 , Dec 29, 2002
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        The Sharon Salzberg quote on happiness here and now catures the
        appeal of Buddhism so nicely. I guess her use of "happiness" is
        synonymous with "joy" but in the following quote Thich Naht Hahn
        suggests a difference between the two words.

        "Joy goes with happiness, but there are differences. When you are
        thirsty and a glass of water is being served to you, that is joy.
        When you are actually able to drink the water, that is happiness. It
        is possible to develop joy in your mind, even when you body is not
        well. This will, in turn, help your body. Joy comes from touching
        things that are refreshing and beautiful, within and outside of
        ourselves. Usually we touch only what's wrong. If we can expand our
        vision and also see what is right, this wider picture always brings
        joy."
        (from The Heart Of Buddha's Teaching", Broadway Books, 1999)
      • Sharon <shar_63@hotmail.com>
        We all long for joy. Some of us strive for what we think will bring us joy so intensely that we will sacrifice anything and everything to get to it. Take
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 4, 2003
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          "We all long for joy. Some of us strive for what we think will bring
          us joy so intensely that we will sacrifice anything and everything to
          get to it. Take the workaholics in my life: if we just have a little
          more, do a little more. There is one more deal to be made, one more
          room to build, an extra report that I could finish before tomorrow, a
          speech that will make me better known and richer.

          "If we're lucky (yes - lucky), some catastrophe will knock us right
          off this tail-chasing track. Maybe we'll be lucky enough to lose our
          job, or a race, or our house, or our money. And at the very moment
          that we feel like a failure, we are given an extraordinary
          opportunity to learn the truth about joy: Joy is never in the stuff
          of our lives, nor is it in the opinions of others or wanting to think
          we're special. Humility is what allows us to live our lives fully,
          giving each moment the attention it deserves. Humility is the
          absence of greed or desire, of wanting things we don't have and
          probably don't need."

          ~ Geri Larkin, "Tap Dancing in Zen"
          Celestial Arts, 2000
        • Sharon <shar_63@hotmail.com>
          Every time you take one mindful step, you have a chance to go from the land of sorrow to the land of joy. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Returning to Our True Home
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 9, 2003
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            "Every time you take one mindful step, you have a chance to go from
            the land of sorrow to the land of joy."

            ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Returning to Our True Home"
            dharma lecture transcript from Plum Village.

            This transcript can be found in its entirety at:
            http://www.plumvillage.org/DharmaDoors/transcripts/transcripts_of_dhar
            ma_talks.htm
          • Sharon
            We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future. The realization that we have
            Message 5 of 22 , Mar 7, 2003
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              "We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our
              minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future.
              The realization that we have already arrived, that we don't have to
              travel any further, that we are already here, can give us peace and
              joy. The conditions for our happiness are already sufficient. We
              only need to allow ourselves to be in the present moment, and we will
              be able to touch them. What are we looking for to be happy?
              Everything is already here. We do not need to put an object in front
              of us to run after, believing that until we get it, we cannot be
              happy. That object is always in the future, and we can never catch
              up to it. We are already in the Pure Land, the Kingdom of God. We
              are already a Buddha. We only need to wake up and realize we are
              already here."

              ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Cultivating the Mind of Love: the Practice of
              Looking Deeply in the Mahayana Buddhist Tradition"

              May this be of benefit.
            • philofillet
              One thing Thich Nhat Hahn teaches in this area is to think I have arrived when in mindful breathing - arrived to my home, to that joy which is always there
              Message 6 of 22 , Mar 8, 2003
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                One thing Thich Nhat Hahn teaches in this area is to think "I have
                arrived" when in mindful breathing - arrived to my home, to that joy
                which is always there to abide in. It's become a bit of a mantra for
                me - or had been until I let it slip away during a recent bad spell.
                I usually say it in French - "Je suis arrivee"- because you know the
                way foreign words work well in mantras. (And for some reason I'm
                feeling appreciative of things French these days. What's the opposite
                of boycott?)
                In Japan, when people come home and open the front door they
                say "Tadaima!" for "I'm home." It literally means "Just this
                moment!", which is also a nice reminder for mindfulness!

                --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                > "We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our
                > minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future.
                > The realization that we have already arrived, that we don't have to
                > travel any further, that we are already here, can give us peace and
                > joy. The conditions for our happiness are already sufficient. We
                > only need to allow ourselves to be in the present moment, and we
                will
                > be able to touch them. What are we looking for to be happy?
                > Everything is already here. We do not need to put an object in
                front
                > of us to run after, believing that until we get it, we cannot be
                > happy. That object is always in the future, and we can never catch
                > up to it. We are already in the Pure Land, the Kingdom of God. We
                > are already a Buddha. We only need to wake up and realize we are
                > already here."
                >
                > ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Cultivating the Mind of Love: the Practice of
                > Looking Deeply in the Mahayana Buddhist Tradition"
                >
                > May this be of benefit.
              • Sharon
                Joy of Meditation as Nourishment 1. Breathing in, I calm my body. Breathing out, I smile. Calm (in-breath) Smile (out-breath) 2. Breathing in, I dwell in the
                Message 7 of 22 , Mar 14, 2003
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                  Joy of Meditation as Nourishment

                  1. Breathing in, I calm my body.
                  Breathing out, I smile.

                  Calm (in-breath)
                  Smile (out-breath)

                  2. Breathing in, I dwell in the present moment.
                  Breathing out, I know it is a wonderful moment.

                  Present moment (in-breath)
                  Wonderful moment (out-breath)

                  Many people begin to practice sitting meditation with the help of
                  this exercise. Even those who have meditated for many years continue
                  to practice it, because the exercise is so effective.

                  Breathing in, give complete attention to the in-breath. Wherever in
                  the body the breath may be, feel the calm it brings. Just like
                  drinking cool water on a hot day, feel how the breath cools the inner
                  organs of the body. When practicing meditation, if the body is calm
                  then the mind is calm. Conscious breathing makes the body and mind
                  one. In breathing out, smile to relax all the facial muscles (the
                  face has about three hundred small muscles in all). The nervous
                  system will also be relaxed. The half smile can be seen as a sign of
                  calm brought by the in-breath, but it is itself also a means of
                  attaining comfort and a clearer awareness of peace and joy. The
                  conscious breathing and smile should be practiced during five, ten,
                  or even fifteen in/out breaths before moving on to the second stage
                  of the exercise.

                  Stage two of the exercise brings us back to the present moment. By
                  dwelling in the present moment, we put an end to attachments to the
                  past and anxieties about the future. Life is only available in the
                  present. We need to return to this moment to be in touch with life
                  as it really is. To know that we are alive, that we can be in
                  contact with all the wonders within us and around us, this is truly a
                  miracle. We need only to open our eyes and to listen carefully to
                  enjoy life's richness. In using conscious breathing, we can
                  transform the present moment into a moment full of wonder and beauty.

                  This exercise can be practiced anywhere at any time: in the
                  meditation hall, in the kitchen, on the bank of a river, in a park,
                  whether we are walking or standing still, lying down, or even when we
                  are working.

                  ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Blooming of a Lotus: Guided Meditation
                  Exercises for Healing and Transformation", Parallax Press, 1993.

                  May this be of benefit.
                • philofillet
                  Hi all, I love Thich Nhat Hahn s writing on the benefits of mindful breathing. It works, defintely. So simple, so effective. All it takes is one breath. And
                  Message 8 of 22 , Mar 14, 2003
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                    Hi all,

                    I love Thich Nhat Hahn's writing on the benefits of mindful
                    breathing. It works, defintely. So simple, so effective. All it takes
                    is one breath. And another. And another. We could spend all our days
                    in the bliss of mindfulness, but our habit energies have their way
                    and our minds rush off. Interesting.
                    --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                    > Joy of Meditation as Nourishment
                    >
                    > 1. Breathing in, I calm my body.
                    > Breathing out, I smile.
                    >
                    > Calm (in-breath)
                    > Smile (out-breath)
                    >
                    > 2. Breathing in, I dwell in the present moment.
                    > Breathing out, I know it is a wonderful moment.
                    >
                    > Present moment (in-breath)
                    > Wonderful moment (out-breath)
                    >
                    > Many people begin to practice sitting meditation with the help of
                    > this exercise. Even those who have meditated for many years
                    continue
                    > to practice it, because the exercise is so effective.
                    >
                    > Breathing in, give complete attention to the in-breath. Wherever
                    in
                    > the body the breath may be, feel the calm it brings. Just like
                    > drinking cool water on a hot day, feel how the breath cools the
                    inner
                    > organs of the body. When practicing meditation, if the body is
                    calm
                    > then the mind is calm. Conscious breathing makes the body and mind
                    > one. In breathing out, smile to relax all the facial muscles (the
                    > face has about three hundred small muscles in all). The nervous
                    > system will also be relaxed. The half smile can be seen as a sign
                    of
                    > calm brought by the in-breath, but it is itself also a means of
                    > attaining comfort and a clearer awareness of peace and joy. The
                    > conscious breathing and smile should be practiced during five, ten,
                    > or even fifteen in/out breaths before moving on to the second stage
                    > of the exercise.
                    >
                    > Stage two of the exercise brings us back to the present moment. By
                    > dwelling in the present moment, we put an end to attachments to the
                    > past and anxieties about the future. Life is only available in the
                    > present. We need to return to this moment to be in touch with life
                    > as it really is. To know that we are alive, that we can be in
                    > contact with all the wonders within us and around us, this is truly
                    a
                    > miracle. We need only to open our eyes and to listen carefully to
                    > enjoy life's richness. In using conscious breathing, we can
                    > transform the present moment into a moment full of wonder and
                    beauty.
                    >
                    > This exercise can be practiced anywhere at any time: in the
                    > meditation hall, in the kitchen, on the bank of a river, in a park,
                    > whether we are walking or standing still, lying down, or even when
                    we
                    > are working.
                    >
                    > ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Blooming of a Lotus: Guided Meditation
                    > Exercises for Healing and Transformation", Parallax Press, 1993.
                    >
                    > May this be of benefit.
                  • Chanter Kyo
                    I love this meditation, I have the book The Blooming of a Lotus I have sent this meditation to many of the Buddhist inmates I write, especially the ones just
                    Message 9 of 22 , Mar 14, 2003
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                      I love this meditation, I have the book "The Blooming of a Lotus" I have sent
                      this meditation to many of the Buddhist inmates I write, especially the ones
                      just starting and they are getting good results. I have also sent some of the
                      others form this book. I really like the simplicity of Thay's teaching, anyone
                      can understand and practice them anywhere, any time. Thank you again for all
                      the great posts and the good replies from the posters, I do read all of them
                      and save some to share with others.


                      --- Sharon <shar_63@...> wrote:
                      > Joy of Meditation as Nourishment
                      >
                      > 1. Breathing in, I calm my body.
                      > Breathing out, I smile.
                      >
                      > Calm (in-breath)
                      > Smile (out-breath)
                      >
                      > 2. Breathing in, I dwell in the present moment.
                      > Breathing out, I know it is a wonderful moment.
                      >
                      > Present moment (in-breath)
                      > Wonderful moment (out-breath)
                      >
                      > Many people begin to practice sitting meditation with the help of
                      > this exercise. Even those who have meditated for many years continue
                      > to practice it, because the exercise is so effective.
                      >
                      > Breathing in, give complete attention to the in-breath. Wherever in
                      > the body the breath may be, feel the calm it brings. Just like
                      > drinking cool water on a hot day, feel how the breath cools the inner
                      > organs of the body. When practicing meditation, if the body is calm
                      > then the mind is calm. Conscious breathing makes the body and mind
                      > one. In breathing out, smile to relax all the facial muscles (the
                      > face has about three hundred small muscles in all). The nervous
                      > system will also be relaxed. The half smile can be seen as a sign of
                      > calm brought by the in-breath, but it is itself also a means of
                      > attaining comfort and a clearer awareness of peace and joy. The
                      > conscious breathing and smile should be practiced during five, ten,
                      > or even fifteen in/out breaths before moving on to the second stage
                      > of the exercise.
                      >
                      > Stage two of the exercise brings us back to the present moment. By
                      > dwelling in the present moment, we put an end to attachments to the
                      > past and anxieties about the future. Life is only available in the
                      > present. We need to return to this moment to be in touch with life
                      > as it really is. To know that we are alive, that we can be in
                      > contact with all the wonders within us and around us, this is truly a
                      > miracle. We need only to open our eyes and to listen carefully to
                      > enjoy life's richness. In using conscious breathing, we can
                      > transform the present moment into a moment full of wonder and beauty.
                      >
                      > This exercise can be practiced anywhere at any time: in the
                      > meditation hall, in the kitchen, on the bank of a river, in a park,
                      > whether we are walking or standing still, lying down, or even when we
                      > are working.
                      >
                      > ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Blooming of a Lotus: Guided Meditation
                      > Exercises for Healing and Transformation", Parallax Press, 1993.
                      >
                      > May this be of benefit.
                      >


                      =====
                      http://BuddhistInmates.net
                      Free Your Mind! The Rest Will Follow

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                    • Sharon
                      The Buddha printed peace, joy, and serenity on the Earth with each step he took. . . When we walk as the Buddha did, we continue his work. We nurture the
                      Message 10 of 22 , Apr 22, 2003
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                        "The Buddha printed peace, joy, and serenity on the Earth with each
                        step he took. . . When we walk as the Buddha did, we continue his
                        work. We nurture the seeds of Buddhahood in ourselves and show our
                        gratitude to the Buddha, not by what we say, but by the way we take
                        peaceful, happy steps on the Earth.

                        "When you practice walking meditation in the morning, your movements
                        will become smooth and your mind will become alert. You will be more
                        aware of what you are doing all day long. In making decisions, you
                        will find that you are more calm and clear, with more insight and
                        compassion. With each peaceful step you take, all beings, near and
                        far, will benefit."

                        ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Long Road Turns to Joy: A Guide to Walking
                        Meditation"

                        May this be of benefit.
                      • Colin D. Neal
                        Dear Sharon: Thanks for all the beautiful gifts of Dhamma which you regularly post on this list. You are following in the footsteps of one of my favorite
                        Message 11 of 22 , Apr 22, 2003
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                          Dear Sharon:

                          Thanks for all the beautiful "gifts of Dhamma" which you regularly post on
                          this list. You are following in the footsteps of one of my favorite
                          teachers:

                          "The West already has so many material things, but of Dhamma there's very
                          little. I've been there, and I have seen for myself that there is so
                          little Dhamma there that leads to peace and tranquility. There are only
                          things that continually make one's mind confused and troubled...So today I
                          will offer you some Dhamma to take back home as a gift..." - A Gift of
                          Dhamma, a talk by Ajahn Chah

                          Source:
                          http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/chah/bodhinyana.html

                          Best wishes...Colin
                        • Sharon
                          Colin, Thank you for your appreciation! :o) It s my pleasure, believe me, to share the quotations that inspire my path with the hope that it will inspire
                          Message 12 of 22 , Apr 22, 2003
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                            Colin,

                            Thank you for your appreciation! :o) It's my pleasure, believe me,
                            to share the quotations that inspire my path with the hope that it
                            will inspire someone else as well.

                            (I appreciate the teachings of Ajahn Chah as well. Thanks for
                            sharing this link with us.)

                            In the Dharma,

                            Sharon


                            --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Colin D. Neal" <cneal@c...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Dear Sharon:
                            >
                            > Thanks for all the beautiful "gifts of Dhamma" which you regularly
                            post on
                            > this list. You are following in the footsteps of one of my favorite
                            > teachers:
                            >
                            > "The West already has so many material things, but of Dhamma
                            there's very
                            > little. I've been there, and I have seen for myself that there is
                            so
                            > little Dhamma there that leads to peace and tranquility. There are
                            only
                            > things that continually make one's mind confused and troubled...So
                            today I
                            > will offer you some Dhamma to take back home as a gift..." - A Gift
                            of
                            > Dhamma, a talk by Ajahn Chah
                            >
                            > Source:
                            > http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/chah/bodhinyana.html
                            >
                            > Best wishes...Colin
                          • Sharon
                            We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future. The realization that we have
                            Message 13 of 22 , May 2, 2003
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                              "We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our
                              minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future.
                              The realization that we have already arrived, that we don't have to
                              travel any further, that we are already here, can give us peace and
                              joy. The conditions for our happiness are already sufficient. We
                              only need to allow ourselves to be in the present moment, and we will
                              be able to touch them. What are we looking for to be happy?
                              Everything is already here. We do not need to put an object in front
                              of us to run after, believing that until we get it, we cannot be
                              happy. That object is always in the future, and we can never catch
                              up to it. We are already in the Pure Land, the Kingdom of God. We
                              are already a Buddha. We only need to wake up and realize we are
                              already here."

                              ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Cultivating the Mind of Love: the Practice of
                              Looking Deeply in the Mahayana Buddhist Tradition", Parallax Press,
                              1996


                              May this be of benefit.
                            • mettamelb
                              When you have done something good, you are joyful. But when we practice this, if somebody is successful, we feel that it is our success, we are joyful together
                              Message 14 of 22 , May 12, 2003
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                                When you have done something good, you are joyful. But
                                when we practice this, if somebody is successful, we
                                feel that it is our success, we are joyful together
                                with him. If you fail an exam that your sister
                                succeeds, you train yourself to be joyful with her
                                success. You don't discriminate¬Ö "oh, she's
                                successful, I am not, I am so mad". No discrimination.
                                You are joyful with her. If somebody has done
                                wonderful work, you are so joyful for him and for you
                                too. Because you feel that you and him/her are one...

                                ...Rejoicing together with others is a very good
                                medicine against jealousy. You are joyful with the joy
                                of others. You are joyful with the success of
                                others...

                                ...I am joyful with the joy of all the merits, people
                                have done in ten thousand directions. In ten thousand
                                directions there are countless people who practice
                                merit. Every merit done by others, I feel that it's my
                                merit. I feel so joyful, so happy...

                                Taking Refuge, © Thich Nhat Hanh
                                http://www.plumvillage.org/


                                =====
                                "Metta is likened to a gentle rain that falls upon the earth" (Lovingkindness, Salzberg: 1995)

                                http://mobile.yahoo.com.au - Yahoo! Mobile
                                - Check & compose your email via SMS on your Telstra or Vodafone mobile.
                              • Sharon
                                O let us live in joy, in love amongst those who hate. Amongst those who hate, let us live in love! O let us live in joy, in health amongst those who are ill!
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jun 28, 2003
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                                  O let us live in joy,
                                  in love amongst those who hate.
                                  Amongst those who hate,
                                  let us live in love!

                                  O let us live in joy,
                                  in health amongst those who are ill!
                                  Amongst those who are ill,
                                  let us live in health.

                                  O let us live in joy,
                                  in peace amongst those who struggle.
                                  Amongst those who struggle,
                                  let us live in peace.

                                  O let us live in joy,
                                  although having nothing.
                                  In joy let us live
                                  like spirits of life!

                                  ~ the Dhammapada


                                  May this be of benefit.
                                • Sharon
                                  The practice of rejoicing can prevent the arising of pride, jealousy, or anger. Whenever you hear that someone else has been successful, rejoice. Always
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jul 19, 2003
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                                    "The practice of rejoicing can prevent the arising of pride,
                                    jealousy, or anger. Whenever you hear that someone else has been
                                    successful, rejoice. Always practice rejoicing for others - whether
                                    your friend or your enemy - even about [worldly] success. For
                                    example, when you hear that someone has been successful in business,
                                    you should rejoice. When you hear that someone has found a partner,
                                    again rejoice. You should think, 'How wonderful it is that they have
                                    found the happiness they were seeking!' Practice feeling as happy
                                    for others as you do for yourself. In other words, cherish others as
                                    you cherish yourself. Feel happy when others find happiness, as if
                                    you yourself had found happiness."

                                    ~ Lama Zopa Rinpoche, "Transforming Problems", Wisdom Publications,
                                    2001


                                    May this be of benefit.
                                  • Sharon
                                    Every time you take one mindful step, you have a chance to go from the land of sorrow to the land of joy. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Returning to Our True Home
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Aug 3 6:17 AM
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                                      "Every time you take one mindful step, you have a chance to go from
                                      the land of sorrow to the land of joy."

                                      ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Returning to Our True Home"
                                      dharma lecture transcript from Plum Village.


                                      May this be of benefit.
                                    • Philip
                                      Hello everyone. Sharon, in light of your encouragement to post quotations, I think I ll be going back to a stretch during the early and mid summer during which
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 3, 2004
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                                        Hello everyone.

                                        Sharon, in light of your encouragement to post quotations, I think
                                        I'll be going back to a stretch during the early and mid summer
                                        during which I wasn't paying proper attention. I hope you don't mind
                                        if I recycle a few.

                                        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > "The Buddha printed peace, joy, and serenity on the Earth with each
                                        > step he took. . . When we walk as the Buddha did, we continue his
                                        > work. We nurture the seeds of Buddhahood in ourselves and show our
                                        > gratitude to the Buddha, not by what we say, but by the way we take
                                        > peaceful, happy steps on the Earth.
                                        >
                                        > "When you practice walking meditation in the morning, your
                                        movements
                                        > will become smooth and your mind will become alert. You will be
                                        more
                                        > aware of what you are doing all day long. In making decisions, you
                                        > will find that you are more calm and clear, with more insight and
                                        > compassion. With each peaceful step you take, all beings, near and
                                        > far, will benefit."
                                        >
                                        > ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Long Road Turns to Joy: A Guide to Walking
                                        > Meditation"
                                        >
                                        > May this be of benefit.

                                        I love walking meditation, but I guess I don't do it in the
                                        traditional way. I walk briskly, for exercise, in a park near here.
                                        It becomes a Brahma-Viharas exercise as well, most days, because I
                                        walk in equanimity and slide into loving-kindness in response to all
                                        the people I come across. I don't send metta beams at them or
                                        anything - just kind of tune into their presence ever so briefly and
                                        keep on walking. At times, compassion or joy are the more natural
                                        responses.
                                        Today there was a lot of joy. A lot of fathers playing with their
                                        kids. Such true and joyous laughter ringing out everywhere.
                                        I do a walk at night as well. Around the same park. Since there's
                                        not much happening at night, it's more of a concentration exercise,
                                        concentrating on my breath and the simple mantra "hei" on the in
                                        breath and "wa" on the outbreath. Heiwa is peace in Japanese. I
                                        stumbled on this. I think it's quite a good little phrase to focus
                                        on!
                                        Do you all have nice places to go for walks?

                                        With Metta,

                                        Philip
                                      • Sharon
                                        The Buddha printed peace, joy, and serenity on the Earth with each step he took. . . When we walk as the Buddha did, we continue his work. We nurture the
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jun 4, 2004
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                                          "The Buddha printed peace, joy, and serenity on the Earth with each
                                          step he took. . . When we walk as the Buddha did, we continue his
                                          work. We nurture the seeds of Buddhahood in ourselves and show our
                                          gratitude to the Buddha, not by what we say, but by the way we take
                                          peaceful, happy steps on the Earth.

                                          "When you practice walking meditation in the morning, your movements
                                          will become smooth and your mind will become alert. You will be more
                                          aware of what you are doing all day long. In making decisions, you
                                          will find that you are more calm and clear, with more insight and
                                          compassion. With each peaceful step you take, all beings, near and
                                          far, will benefit."

                                          ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Long Road Turns to Joy: A Guide to Walking
                                          Meditation," Parallax Press, 1996.


                                          May this be of benefit.
                                        • Sharon
                                          We make our lives miserable by being miserable, so why not do exactly the opposite, and make our lives happy, joyful, and harmonious, by being happy, joyful,
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Aug 29 6:17 AM
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                                            "We make our lives miserable by being miserable, so why not do
                                            exactly the opposite, and make our lives happy, joyful, and
                                            harmonious, by being happy, joyful, and harmonious? We create our own
                                            lives and yet we think that something else is doing it. All we have
                                            to do is change our mental reactions towards the opposite direction.
                                            And the way to do that is to meditate, otherwise we won't have the
                                            strength of mind to do it. A mind that can meditate is a mind that is
                                            one-pointed. And a mind that is one-pointed, the Buddha said, is like
                                            an ax that has been sharpened. It has a sharp edge that can cut
                                            through everything. If we want to remove stress and strain, and have
                                            a different quality of life, we have every opportunity. We need to
                                            strengthen our mind to the point where it will not suffer from the
                                            things which exist in the world."

                                            ~ from Buddhism Through American Women's Eyes, ed. Karma Lekshe
                                            Tsomo, Snow Lion Publications.


                                            May this be of benefit.
                                          • Sharon Werner
                                            Joy We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future. The realization that we
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Apr 20, 2005
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                                              Joy

                                              "We all have the tendency to struggle in our bodies and in our minds. We believe that happiness is possible only in the future. The realization that we have already arrived, that we don't have to travel any further, that we are already here, can give us peace and joy. The conditions for our happiness are already sufficient. We only need to allow ourselves to be in the present moment, and we will be able to touch them. What are we looking for to be happy? Everything is already here. We do not need to put an object in front of us to run after, believing that until we get it, we cannot be happy. That object is always in the future, and we can never catch up to it. We are already in the Pure Land, the Kingdom of God. We are already a Buddha. We only need to wake up and realize we are already here."~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "Cultivating the Mind of Love: the Practice of Looking Deeply in the Mahayana Buddhist Tradition", Parallax Press, 1996

                                              May this be of benefit.

                                            • Sharon
                                              Joy of Meditation as Nourishment 1. Breathing in, I calm my body. Breathing out, I smile. Calm (in-breath) Smile (out-breath) 2. Breathing in, I dwell in the
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Aug 30 5:38 AM
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                                                Joy of Meditation as Nourishment

                                                1. Breathing in, I calm my body.
                                                Breathing out, I smile.

                                                Calm (in-breath)
                                                Smile (out-breath)

                                                2. Breathing in, I dwell in the present moment.
                                                Breathing out, I know it is a wonderful moment.

                                                Present moment (in-breath)
                                                Wonderful moment (out-breath)

                                                Many people begin to practice sitting meditation with the help of
                                                this exercise. Even those who have meditated for many years continue
                                                to practice it, because the exercise is so effective.

                                                Breathing in, give complete attention to the in-breath. Wherever in
                                                the body the breath may be, feel the calm it brings. Just like
                                                drinking cool water on a hot day, feel how the breath cools the inner
                                                organs of the body. When practicing meditation, if the body is calm
                                                then the mind is calm. Conscious breathing makes the body and mind
                                                one. In breathing out, smile to relax all the facial muscles (the
                                                face has about three hundred small muscles in all). The nervous
                                                system will also be relaxed. The half smile can be seen as a sign of
                                                calm brought by the in-breath, but it is itself also a means of
                                                attaining comfort and a clearer awareness of peace and joy. The
                                                conscious breathing and smile should be practiced during five, ten,
                                                or even fifteen in/out breaths before moving on to the second stage
                                                of the exercise.

                                                Stage two of the exercise brings us back to the present moment. By
                                                dwelling in the present moment, we put an end to attachments to the
                                                past and anxieties about the future. Life is only available in the
                                                present. We need to return to this moment to be in touch with life
                                                as it really is. To know that we are alive, that we can be in
                                                contact with all the wonders within us and around us, this is truly a
                                                miracle. We need only to open our eyes and to listen carefully to
                                                enjoy life's richness. In using conscious breathing, we can
                                                transform the present moment into a moment full of wonder and beauty.

                                                This exercise can be practiced anywhere at any time: in the
                                                meditation hall, in the kitchen, on the bank of a river, in a park,
                                                whether we are walking or standing still, lying down, or even when we
                                                are working.

                                                ~ Thich Nhat Hanh, "The Blooming of a Lotus: Guided Meditation
                                                Exercises for Healing and Transformation", Parallax Press, 1993.

                                                May this be of benefit.
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