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Compassion by Stephen Levine

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  • Antony Woods
    When your fear touches someone s pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone s pain it becomes compassion. http://www.sukhi.com/compassion.htm From:
    Message 1 of 7 , May 2, 2007
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      "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
      when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
      http://www.sukhi.com/compassion.htm
      From: Compassion - The Wish Fulfilling Jewel
    • antony272b2
      When your fear touches someone s pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone s pain it becomes compassion. ~ Stephen Levine
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 6, 2010
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        "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
        when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
        ~ Stephen Levine
      • Sharon Werner
        This is wonderful; compassion in a nutshell. Thank you! ****************************************************************************** When your fear
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 7, 2010
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          This is wonderful; "compassion in a nutshell." Thank you!

          ******************************************************************************

          "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
          when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
          ~ Stephen Levine

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • antony272b2
          Hi Sharon, Here is the full article! With metta and compassion / Antony. +++++ Compassion - The Wish Fulfilling Jewel We all yearn for happiness, yet our
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 7, 2010
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            Hi Sharon,

            Here is the full article!

            With metta and compassion / Antony.
            +++++
            Compassion - The Wish Fulfilling Jewel

            "We all yearn for happiness, yet our actions are generally uncompassionate and bring ourselves and others harm and distress, instead of the happiness we all seek.

            Does a canny, self-grasping, resourceful selfishness, a selfish protection of the ego make us happy?
            When you really investigate self-cherishing and self-grasping they are seen as the root of all harm we do to others, and also to ourselves.

            Considering yourself the same as others - We all want to be happy and want to avoid suffering. It is important to realise our sameness as human beings.
            If you are having difficulties with a loved one, such as your mother or father, husband or wife, lover or friend, how revealing it can be to consider the other person simply as another 'you', another human being, with the same feelings as you, the same desire for happiness and fear of suffering as you, rather than in their role as mother or father etc. Thinking of the person as a real person, exactly the same as you, will open your heart to him or her.
            If only societies and nations could view each other in the same way - there would be a solid basis for peace and the happy coexistence of all peoples.

            Exchanging yourself for others - when someone is suffering and you feel at a loss to know how to help, put yourself in his or her place. Imagine what you would be going through if you were suffering the same pain. Ask yourself "how would I feel? How would I want my friends to treat me? What would I most want from them?"
            When you exchange yourself for others in this way, you are directly transferring your cherishing from its usual object, yourself, to other beings. Exchanging yourself for others is a powerful way of loosening the hold on you of the self-cherishing and self grasping of the ego, and so of releasing the heart of your compassion.

            Meditating on Compassion - Evoking the power of compassion in us is not always easy. Every day, life gives us innumerable chances to open our hearts.. if only we can take them. An old woman passes you with a sad and lonely face, swollen veins on her legs, and two heavy plastic bags full of shopping she can hardly carry, a shabbily dressed old man shuffles in front of you, a boy on crutches looks harried and anxious as he tries to cross the street in the afternoon traffic, an animal lies bleeding to death on the side of the road.
            All beings, everywhere suffer, let your heart go out to them all in spontaneous and immeasurable compassion. Direct that compassion to the alleviation of suffering everywhere.
            Compassion is a far greater and nobler thing than pity. Pity has its roots in fear, and a sense of arrogance and condescension, sometimes even a smug feeling of "I'm glad it's not me". As Stephen Levine said 'When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion.' To practice compassion is to know that all beings are the same and suffer in similar ways, to honour all those that suffer, and to know that you are neither separate nor superior to anyone.
            Your first response on seeing someone suffer becomes not mere pity, but deep compassion. You feel for that person respect and even gratitude, because you know that whoever prompts you to develop compassion by their suffering is giving you one of the greatest gifts of all, because they are helping you to develop the very quality that you need the most."
            http://web.archive.org/web/20080522085324/http://www.sukhi.com/compassion.htm

            From: Sharon Werner (sharonwerner@...)
            Sent: Thursday, 7 January 2010 7:30:47 PM
            To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Compassion by Stephen Levine‏

            This is wonderful; "compassion in a nutshell." Thank you!

            ******************************************************************************

            "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
            when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
            ~ Stephen Levine
          • Sharon Werner
            Thanks! How were your holidays? ... From: antony272b2 To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 3:51 AM Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Re:
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 7, 2010
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              Thanks! How were your holidays?

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: antony272b2
              To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 3:51 AM
              Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Re: Compassion by Stephen Levine



              Hi Sharon,

              Here is the full article!

              With metta and compassion / Antony.
              +++++
              Compassion - The Wish Fulfilling Jewel

              "We all yearn for happiness, yet our actions are generally uncompassionate and bring ourselves and others harm and distress, instead of the happiness we all seek.

              Does a canny, self-grasping, resourceful selfishness, a selfish protection of the ego make us happy?
              When you really investigate self-cherishing and self-grasping they are seen as the root of all harm we do to others, and also to ourselves.

              Considering yourself the same as others - We all want to be happy and want to avoid suffering. It is important to realise our sameness as human beings.
              If you are having difficulties with a loved one, such as your mother or father, husband or wife, lover or friend, how revealing it can be to consider the other person simply as another 'you', another human being, with the same feelings as you, the same desire for happiness and fear of suffering as you, rather than in their role as mother or father etc. Thinking of the person as a real person, exactly the same as you, will open your heart to him or her.
              If only societies and nations could view each other in the same way - there would be a solid basis for peace and the happy coexistence of all peoples.

              Exchanging yourself for others - when someone is suffering and you feel at a loss to know how to help, put yourself in his or her place. Imagine what you would be going through if you were suffering the same pain. Ask yourself "how would I feel? How would I want my friends to treat me? What would I most want from them?"
              When you exchange yourself for others in this way, you are directly transferring your cherishing from its usual object, yourself, to other beings. Exchanging yourself for others is a powerful way of loosening the hold on you of the self-cherishing and self grasping of the ego, and so of releasing the heart of your compassion.

              Meditating on Compassion - Evoking the power of compassion in us is not always easy. Every day, life gives us innumerable chances to open our hearts.. if only we can take them. An old woman passes you with a sad and lonely face, swollen veins on her legs, and two heavy plastic bags full of shopping she can hardly carry, a shabbily dressed old man shuffles in front of you, a boy on crutches looks harried and anxious as he tries to cross the street in the afternoon traffic, an animal lies bleeding to death on the side of the road.
              All beings, everywhere suffer, let your heart go out to them all in spontaneous and immeasurable compassion. Direct that compassion to the alleviation of suffering everywhere.
              Compassion is a far greater and nobler thing than pity. Pity has its roots in fear, and a sense of arrogance and condescension, sometimes even a smug feeling of "I'm glad it's not me". As Stephen Levine said 'When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion.' To practice compassion is to know that all beings are the same and suffer in similar ways, to honour all those that suffer, and to know that you are neither separate nor superior to anyone.
              Your first response on seeing someone suffer becomes not mere pity, but deep compassion. You feel for that person respect and even gratitude, because you know that whoever prompts you to develop compassion by their suffering is giving you one of the greatest gifts of all, because they are helping you to develop the very quality that you need the most."
              http://web.archive.org/web/20080522085324/http://www.sukhi.com/compassion.htm

              From: Sharon Werner (sharonwerner@...)
              Sent: Thursday, 7 January 2010 7:30:47 PM
              To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Compassion by Stephen Levine‏

              This is wonderful; "compassion in a nutshell." Thank you!

              ******************************************************************************

              "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
              when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
              ~ Stephen Levine





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • antony272b2
              Sharon, Yes the InterNet archive Wayback Machine salvaged the article! Good news is that my neighbor is a lot better (in a brand-new nursing home near his son
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 7, 2010
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                Sharon,

                Yes the InterNet archive Wayback Machine salvaged the article!

                Good news is that my neighbor is a lot better (in a brand-new nursing home near his son on the south coast), although he has skin cancer and needs a skin graft and he doesn't want to go to hospital. An example of happy compassion was taking the initiative to buy his groceries in April (he never asks for any help). It made me feel young and strong.

                I had Christmas with my parents, brother, his wife and my baby nephew. We aren't teaching the Santa Claus myth and he was asked to carry a present to Nana (my Mum). He turned around and walked to me (he's only just started walking) and gave it to me. He then proceeded to bring and give me bits of wrapping paper, toy cars etc. I haven't held him for about a year after he cried in my arms (and now he's too heavy!) I'm hoping that the spirit of generosity continues to create harmony in the family (see my dana-giving group).

                My American and English friends tell me how lucky we are in Sydney not to have snow. We had a lot of rain in New South Wales with some flooding but was mostly good news for the farmers. I hope you are safe, comfortable and warm.

                With metta and compassion / Antony.

                From: Sharon Werner (sharonwerner@...)
                Sent: Thursday, 7 January 2010 10:00:41 PM
                To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: Compassion by Stephen Levine‏

                Thanks! How were your holidays?

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: antony272b2
                To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 3:51 AM
                Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Re: Compassion by Stephen Levine

                Hi Sharon,

                Here is the full article!

                With metta and compassion / Antony.
                +++++
                Compassion - The Wish Fulfilling Jewel

                "We all yearn for happiness, yet our actions are generally uncompassionate and bring ourselves and others harm and distress, instead of the happiness we all seek.

                Does a canny, self-grasping, resourceful selfishness, a selfish protection of the ego make us happy?
                When you really investigate self-cherishing and self-grasping they are seen as the root of all harm we do to others, and also to ourselves.

                Considering yourself the same as others - We all want to be happy and want to avoid suffering. It is important to realise our sameness as human beings.
                If you are having difficulties with a loved one, such as your mother or father, husband or wife, lover or friend, how revealing it can be to consider the other person simply as another 'you', another human being, with the same feelings as you, the same desire for happiness and fear of suffering as you, rather than in their role as mother or father etc. Thinking of the person as a real person, exactly the same as you, will open your heart to him or her.
                If only societies and nations could view each other in the same way - there would be a solid basis for peace and the happy coexistence of all peoples.

                Exchanging yourself for others - when someone is suffering and you feel at a loss to know how to help, put yourself in his or her place. Imagine what you would be going through if you were suffering the same pain. Ask yourself "how would I feel? How would I want my friends to treat me? What would I most want from them?"
                When you exchange yourself for others in this way, you are directly transferring your cherishing from its usual object, yourself, to other beings. Exchanging yourself for others is a powerful way of loosening the hold on you of the self-cherishing and self grasping of the ego, and so of releasing the heart of your compassion.

                Meditating on Compassion - Evoking the power of compassion in us is not always easy. Every day, life gives us innumerable chances to open our hearts.. if only we can take them. An old woman passes you with a sad and lonely face, swollen veins on her legs, and two heavy plastic bags full of shopping she can hardly carry, a shabbily dressed old man shuffles in front of you, a boy on crutches looks harried and anxious as he tries to cross the street in the afternoon traffic, an animal lies bleeding to death on the side of the road.
                All beings, everywhere suffer, let your heart go out to them all in spontaneous and immeasurable compassion. Direct that compassion to the alleviation of suffering everywhere.
                Compassion is a far greater and nobler thing than pity. Pity has its roots in fear, and a sense of arrogance and condescension, sometimes even a smug feeling of "I'm glad it's not me". As Stephen Levine said 'When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion.' To practice compassion is to know that all beings are the same and suffer in similar ways, to honour all those that suffer, and to know that you are neither separate nor superior to anyone.
                Your first response on seeing someone suffer becomes not mere pity, but deep compassion. You feel for that person respect and even gratitude, because you know that whoever prompts you to develop compassion by their suffering is giving you one of the greatest gifts of all, because they are helping you to develop the very quality that you need the most."
                http://web.archive.org/web/20080522085324/http://www.sukhi.com/compassion.htm

                From: Sharon Werner (sharonwerner@...)
                Sent: Thursday, 7 January 2010 7:30:47 PM
                To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Compassion by Stephen Levine‏

                This is wonderful; "compassion in a nutshell." Thank you!

                ******************************************************************************

                "When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity;
                when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion."
                ~ Stephen Levine
              • antony272b2
                Compassion vs. Pity (Sogyal Rinpoche) Compassion is a far greater and nobler thing than pity. Pity has its roots in fear, and a sense of arrogance and
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 5 5:48 PM
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                  Compassion vs. Pity (Sogyal Rinpoche)
                  "Compassion is a far greater and nobler thing than pity. Pity has its roots in fear, and a sense of arrogance and condescension, sometimes even a smug feeling of "I'm glad it's not me". As Stephen Levine said 'When your fear touches someone's pain it becomes pity; when your love touches someone's pain it becomes compassion.' To practice compassion is to know that all beings are the same and suffer in similar ways, to honour all those that suffer, and to know that you are neither separate nor superior to anyone.
                  Your first response on seeing someone suffer becomes not mere pity, but deep compassion. You feel for that person respect and even gratitude, because you know that whoever prompts you to develop compassion by their suffering is giving you one of the greatest gifts of all, because they are helping you to develop the very quality that you need the most."
                  http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/compassion-loving-kindness.htm
                  From: The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
                  by Sogyal Rinpoche
                  San Francisco, Harper San Francisco 1992

                  With metta / Antony.
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