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Tara Brach on compassion

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  • Sharon
    Compassion Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we ve done might temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and hating
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 8, 2006
      Compassion

      "Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done might
      temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
      hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
      punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
      with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
      respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."

      ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the
      Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003



      May this be of benefit.
    • Sharon
      Compassion Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we ve done might temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and hating
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 8, 2006
        Compassion

        "Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done might
        temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
        hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
        punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
        with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
        respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."

        ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the
        Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003



        May this be of benefit.
      • Antony Woods
        Dear Sharon, How are you? Here is another teaching on this theme: Guilt is another barrier to Metta practice. Guilt has an element of self-hatred in it, it
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 9, 2006
          Dear Sharon,

          How are you?

          Here is another teaching on this theme:

          "Guilt is another barrier to Metta practice.
          Guilt has an element of self-hatred in it, it drains energy, it
          paralyzes us.
          Remorse is freeing, we forgive ourselves for the harm we have done to
          self or others and use the freed energy to work to improve ourselves,
          make sure we don't repeat the offense.
          We need all of our energy if we're to overcome our unskillful habits
          especially aversion and hatred.
          We need to move from the trap of guilt to the freedom of remorse;
          forgive ourselves and move on."
          http://www.bemindful.org/metta.htm
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forgivenessBuddhism/message/36

          with metta / Antony.

          >From: "Sharon" <sharonwerner@...>
          >To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Tara Brach on compassion
          >Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2006 16:50:08 -0000
          >
          >Compassion
          >
          >"Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done
          might
          >temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
          >hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
          >punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
          >with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
          >respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."
          >
          >~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With
          the
          >Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003
          >
          >May this be of benefit.
          >
        • Sharon Werner
          Antony, I am well, thanks. :o) I think these teachings on guilt are very useful. The distinction between guilt and remorse is a crucial one, I think. Have a
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 10, 2006
            Antony,

            I am well, thanks. :o) I think these teachings on guilt are very useful. The distinction between guilt and remorse is a crucial one, I think.

            Have a great day!

            In lovingkindness,

            Sharon

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Antony Woods
            To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, July 09, 2006 6:25 PM
            Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Re: Tara Brach on compassion


            Dear Sharon,

            How are you?

            Here is another teaching on this theme:

            "Guilt is another barrier to Metta practice.
            Guilt has an element of self-hatred in it, it drains energy, it
            paralyzes us.
            Remorse is freeing, we forgive ourselves for the harm we have done to
            self or others and use the freed energy to work to improve ourselves,
            make sure we don't repeat the offense.
            We need all of our energy if we're to overcome our unskillful habits
            especially aversion and hatred.
            We need to move from the trap of guilt to the freedom of remorse;
            forgive ourselves and move on."
            http://www.bemindful.org/metta.htm
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/forgivenessBuddhism/message/36

            with metta / Antony.

            >From: "Sharon" <sharonwerner@...>
            >To: Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [Buddhaviharas] Tara Brach on compassion
            >Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2006 16:50:08 -0000
            >
            >Compassion
            >
            >"Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done
            might
            >temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
            >hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
            >punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
            >with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
            >respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."
            >
            >~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With
            the
            >Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003
            >
            >May this be of benefit.
            >





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Sharon
            Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that encourages others around us
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 17 4:21 AM
              "Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when
              we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that
              encourages others around us to relax and open up. Each time we widen
              the circle of caring - with a smile, a hug, a listening presence, a
              prayer - the ripples flow out endlessly. When we offer comfort to the
              person sitting by our side, our kindness spreads through the world.
              Whether offered inwardly or to others, the bodhisattva's compassion
              is a gentle rain that touches, without bias, all of life."

              ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With
              the Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003


              May this be of benefit.
            • Sharon Werner
              It s said that the heart of Buddhism is compassion, is holding tenderly the life that is here and not turning on it. The heart of Buddhism is compassion; and
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 28 3:12 AM
                "It's said that the heart of Buddhism is compassion, is holding tenderly the life that is here and not turning on it. The heart of Buddhism is compassion; and the heart of compassion is compassion towards ourselves. We're not talking about compassion toward the story of a self, but of compassion toward the life moment to moment that's being experienced."

                ~ Tara Brach (Insight Meditation Community of Washington), excerpted from audio dharma teaching "Self-Forgiveness" (part 1), recorded 1-31-07.

                The entire lecture can be listened to live streaming or downloaded at:

                http://www.imcw.org/audio-dharma


                May this be of benefit.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Robert Durkin
                These are excellent posts, Sharon. I am especially attentive to the posts on Equanimity. With metta, HikerBob in El Paso, Texas, USA Sharon Werner
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 28 9:40 AM
                  These are excellent posts, Sharon. I am especially attentive to the posts on Equanimity.

                  With metta,
                  HikerBob in El Paso, Texas, USA

                  Sharon Werner <sharonwerner@...> wrote: "It's said that the heart of Buddhism is compassion, is holding tenderly the life that is here and not turning on it. The heart of Buddhism is compassion; and the heart of compassion is compassion towards ourselves. We're not talking about compassion toward the story of a self, but of compassion toward the life moment to moment that's being experienced."

                  ~ Tara Brach (Insight Meditation Community of Washington), excerpted from audio dharma teaching "Self-Forgiveness" (part 1), recorded 1-31-07.

                  The entire lecture can be listened to live streaming or downloaded at:

                  http://www.imcw.org/audio-dharma

                  May this be of benefit.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Sharon Werner
                  The level of suffering [we feel] is directly related to how we are relating to [our inner weather systems] . . . When things are unpleasant we add the idea
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 30 3:14 AM
                    "The level of suffering [we feel] is directly related to how we are relating to [our inner weather systems] . . . When things are unpleasant we add the idea and the full-blown sense that it's helping to a self, and the self is a "bad" self. This is a proliferation that is so pervasive that I've come to sense it as the primary manifestation of suffering. In some way when the weather systems aren't pleasant that there's [a sense that there is a] a "bad" self it's happening to. What happens is that whether it's fear or whatever, what it implicates is a self that either deserves [suffering] or is causing [suffering] or is the problem. I'd like to explore together how this proliferation happens and consider what it means to have a Nonproliferation Treaty with ourselves."

                    ~ Tara Brach (Insight Meditation Community of Washington), excerpted from audio
                    dharma teaching "Self-Forgiveness" (part 1), recorded 1-31-07.

                    The entire lecture can be listened to live streaming or downloaded at:

                    http://www.imcw.org/audio-dharma


                    May this be of benefit.



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Sharon
                    . . . as we feel suffering and relate to it with care rather than resistance, we awaken the heart of compassion. ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., Radical Acceptance:
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 27, 2008
                      ". . . as we feel suffering and relate to it with care rather than
                      resistance, we awaken the heart of compassion."

                      ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the
                      Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Books, 2003.


                      May this be of benefit.
                    • Sharon
                      Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we ve done might temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and hating ourselves
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 6 4:04 AM
                        "Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done might
                        temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
                        hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
                        punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
                        with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
                        respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."

                        ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the
                        Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003



                        May this be of benefit.
                      • shar_63
                        Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that encourages others around us
                        Message 11 of 14 , May 13, 2010
                          "Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when
                          we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that
                          encourages others around us to relax and open up. Each time we widen
                          the circle of caring - with a smile, a hug, a listening presence, a
                          prayer - the ripples flow out endlessly. When we offer comfort to the
                          person sitting by our side, our kindness spreads through the world.
                          Whether offered inwardly or to others, the bodhisattva's compassion
                          is a gentle rain that touches, without bias, all of life."

                          ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With
                          the Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003


                          May this be of benefit.
                        • shar_63
                          Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we ve done might temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and hating ourselves
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 3, 2011
                            "Feeling guilty and bad about ourselves for something we've done might
                            temporarily restrain us from doing harm, but ultimately blaming and
                            hating ourselves only leads to further harmful actions. We can't
                            punish ourselves into being a good person. Only by holding ourselves
                            with the compassion of forgiveness do we experience our goodness and
                            respond to our circumstances with wisdom and care."

                            ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the
                            Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003



                            May this be of benefit.
                          • sharon werner
                            Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that encourages others around us
                            Message 13 of 14 , May 12, 2013
                              "Just as a bright sun causes ice cubes to melt, in the moments when
                              we feel connected and kind, we create a warm environment that
                              encourages others around us to relax and open up. Each time we widen
                              the circle of caring - with a smile, a hug, a listening presence, a
                              prayer - the ripples flow out endlessly. When we offer comfort to the
                              person sitting by our side, our kindness spreads through the world.
                              Whether offered inwardly or to others, the bodhisattva's compassion
                              is a gentle rain that touches, without bias, all of life."

                              ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With
                              the Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Dell, June 2003


                              May this be of benefit.
                            • shar_63
                              . . . as we feel suffering and relate to it with care rather than resistance, we awaken the heart of compassion. ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., Radical Acceptance:
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 7, 2014
                                ". . . as we feel suffering and relate to it with care rather than resistance, we awaken the heart of compassion."
                                 
                                ~ Tara Brach, Ph.D., "Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha," Bantam Books, 2003.
                                 
                                 
                                May this be of benefit.

                                 


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