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Mudita (sympathetic or appreciative joy)

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  • Sharon Werner
    Mudita (sympathetic or appreciative joy) Envy and jealousy are the chief opponents of mudita, or appreciative joy. These noxious qualities arise partly out of
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 10, 2005

      Mudita (sympathetic or appreciative joy)

      "Envy and jealousy are the chief opponents of mudita, or appreciative joy. These noxious qualities arise partly out of a lack of confidence in one's achievements and one's capacity to achieve. Dislike, boredom -- nuances of the Pali term arati -- may be considered as enemies of mudita. The opposite sterling virtues which can vanquish these enemies are loving-kindness, metta, and compassion, karuna. Mudita is placed third in the listing of the Brahma Viharas, for mudita is the natural outcome of the two preceding benign mental states. Metta and karuna are the forces that urge one to alleviate the sufferings of others with purely altruistic motives, expecting nothing in return -- not even gratitude. What matters to the Buddhist is the little bit of joy he has brought to another's heart by relieving him of even a little bit of sorrow, of suffering. Little do people realize how a kind word, a warm smile, a loving touch can act as a balm to a sorrow-laden heart. We can now see how mudita becomes a natural result of metta and karuna."

       

      From: "The Heart Awakened - Three Essays",
      by Eileen Siriwardhana.
      Bodhi Leaves No. 93. Buddhist Publication Society.
      Kandy, Sri Lanka]

       

      May this be of benefit.

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