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Re: Equanimity

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  • Philip
    Hi Garry, and all Nice to meet you Garry. ... which is ... being ... attachment. Are we ... teaching or ... Ph: Exactly. It s so easy to misunderstand Dhamma
    Message 1 of 121 , Jun 1, 2004
      Hi Garry, and all

      Nice to meet you Garry.

      > I do understand that it is important to seek and experience that
      which is
      > good and spiritually satisfying in life. I do wish to point out the
      being
      > dependent on Dhamma study or any other wise teaching is still
      attachment. Are we
      > to be so inflexible that we are lost without any particular
      teaching or
      > knowledge at the time we choose to access it?

      Ph: Exactly. It's so easy to misunderstand Dhamma as a source of
      wisdom that we can gather. And when we get into the mindset, not
      having our books, our favourite quotes is another form of suffering.
      We don't realize that all the teaching is about shedding, not
      gaining. And we don't appreciate the value of a simple moment of
      mindfulness, which we don't need books or teachings for.

      >If I insist on what I believe that I
      > need, I may be denying maybe of what I truly need. Isn't this the
      essense of
      > true openness?

      Ph: Well, I think I have developed some kind of faith in the
      Buddha's teaching, and while I wouldn't go sa far as saying I would
      take my hands off the steering wheel and let the Buddha drive, or any
      Xtian sounding phrase like that, I do think that there is a *belief*
      that the Dhamma is what we *all* need and deserve - of course- to be
      liberated from suffering. I do believe the Dhamma provides the
      supreme expression of insight into the way the mind works, and in a
      very explicit way. (Nothing gets more explicit than Abhidhamma, which
      I'm very keen on these days.) I do take refuge in it, have faith in
      it. So insisting on the need to study Dhamma does make sense to me.
      And yet, as we've been saying, there's the risk of becoming dependent.

      > I do count on my readings and meditations to help focus and
      > center me, but I replace one attachment with another, I am doing
      myself a true
      > disservice. I do respect and revere the great teachings, but I am
      meant to
      > be no more dependent on them than I am meant to be dependent on
      the illusions
      > I used to seek security before I stepped foot on this path.

      Ph: Dependent, no. But taking refuge, yes. I'm not sure what the
      difference is there, but it's surely worth thinking about! :)

      Metta,
      Phil



      --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, wildchildgarry@a... wrote:
      >
      > Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 00:27:56 -0000
      > From: "Philip" <plnao@j...>
      > Subject: Re: Equanimity
      >
      > How do we know if it's an attachment has been formed? I guess if
      > it's taken away, or we can't have it, there is dissatisfaction. I
      > always remember Pema Chodron talking about chocolate cake. Nothing
      > wrong with chocolate cake, as long as we're still content when we
      > can't have it.
      > The friends I discuss things with at my Abhidhamma group have very
      > strict definitions of attachment. It extends to Dhamma study, of
      > course. Could you start your day without a bit of Dhamma from a
      > favourite book, or discussion at a favourite group without feeling
      > dissatisfied. I know I couldn't at this point. I argue that
      > attachment to Dhamma is OK, because it leads us deeper into
      Dhamma,
      > and to understanding that eventually linerates us from the
      > attachment.
      >
      > Metta,
      > Phil
      >
      > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
      <sharonwerner@c...>
      > wrote:
      > > "It is not our preferences that cause problems but our
      attacments
      > to
      > > them."
      > >
      > > ~ Jack Kornfield, "Buddha's Little Instruction Book," Bantam
      Books,
      > > 1994
      > >
      > >
      > > May this be of benefit.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ______________________________________________________________________
      __
      >
      ______________________________________________________________________
      __
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 00:54:11 -0000
      > From: "Sharon" <sharonwerner@c...>
      > Subject: Re: Equanimity
      >
      > Philip,
      >
      > I'm fairly certain I've read (from various teachers) that desire
      for
      > liberation is considered a "wholesome desire." (If I can find a
      > direct quotation, I'll send it in.) I know I count on the dharma
      > every single day - meditation, study, and, of course, discussion
      with
      > fine groups such as this!
      >
      > In lovingkindness,
      >
      > Sharon
      >
      > Dear Philip, Sharon and other friend,
      > I know that I am a novice, a true beginner, on this road of
      lifetime
      > discovery and hopeful enlightenment, so if I appear off the mark,
      please forgive
      > these thoughts as earnest attempts to see the truth.
      > I do understand that it is important to seek and experience that
      which is
      > good and spiritually satisfying in life. I do wish to point out the
      being
      > dependent on Dhamma study or any other wise teaching is still
      attachment. Are we
      > to be so inflexible that we are lost without any particular
      teaching or
      > knowledge at the time we choose to access it? If I insist on what I
      believe that I
      > need, I may be denying maybe of what I truly need. Isn't this the
      essense of
      > true openness? I do count on my readings and meditations to help
      focus and
      > center me, but I replace one attachment with another, I am doing
      myself a true
      > disservice. I do respect and revere the great teachings, but I am
      meant to
      > be no more dependent on them than I am meant to be dependent on
      the illusions
      > I used to seek security before I stepped foot on this path.
      > Let us all benefit from all the great teachings set before us, but
      not be so
      > dependent as to replace that knowledge for our own enlightened
      judgment and
      > lessons.
      > May all that touches our lives be of benefit,
      > Garry
    • antony272b2
      How can we develop [an attitude of equanimity]? Well, one thing we can do is to check our mind, to question why we respond the way we do. Why do we feel hurt
      Message 121 of 121 , Feb 21, 2011
        "How can we develop [an attitude of equanimity]?
        Well, one thing we can do is to check our mind, to question why we respond the way we do.
        Why do we feel hurt and angry when someone says bad things about us?
        Why are we so concerned about what other people think and say about us?
        Does the opinion of others make us what we are?
        If other people dislike and criticize us, does that necessarily mean we are bad?
        Alternatively, if others like and respect us, does that necessarily mean we are good?

        "Giving too much credence to what others say about us can cause us to
        be emotionally unstable and to have an unrealistic view of ourselves."

        ~ The Eight Verses of Thought Transformation
        An explanation by Ven Sangye Khadro

        Thanks Sharon for posting this in 2005.
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