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Re: compassion, love and our human potential

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  • Philip
    Hi Sharon Thanks for the encouragement. It has been difficult to try to reconcile the two approaches - but you remind me that there s no need to try to do so.
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 11, 2004
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      Hi Sharon

      Thanks for the encouragement. It has been difficult to try to
      reconcile the two approaches - but you remind me that there's no need
      to try to do so. Wisdom wing and compassion wing. And of course, the
      two practices can support each other. The abhidhamma helps me get to
      a deeper understanding of not-self, so that should make it easier for
      metta and karuna to flow, because the barriers of self and
      personality are weakened/removed.
      Instead of fretting about it, I should just be grateful to have my
      practice broadened.
      It is a wonderful group. (Yahoo, "Dhammastudy Group".) THe author
      of the books I'm reading (Nina van Gorkom) participates in the group
      and I'm fortunate enough to be able to get feedback from her
      directly.

      Metta,
      Phil



      --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...> wrote:
      > Phil,
      >
      > What a wonderful opportunity to be able to study with such a
      group!
      > I'll bet you're really enjoying that.
      >
      > Your message made me think of the fact that in Tibetan Buddhism
      they
      > separate the teachings more or less into two categories: Absolute
      > Bodhicitta (absolute truth) and Relative Bodhicitta (or relative
      > truth), otherwise known as the wisdom wing and the compassion
      wing.
      > It sounds as if your Abhidhamma studies fall into the first
      category
      > and our Brahmaviharas practice falls more into the second.
      >
      > The Tibetan teachers point out that we need both wings of the path
      > for balance, the way a bird needs two wings in order to fly.
      >
      > I find it all mightily confusing, and hard to reconcile the two
      > paths, as well. I guess I'll just keep plugging along . . .
      >
      > :o)
      >
      > In lovingkindness,
      >
      > Sharon
      >
      > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Philip" <plnao@j...> wrote:
      > >
      > > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon. Lately I've been
      > > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful group.
      > > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate realities
      rising
      > > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for conceptual work, and
      > as
      > > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a critical
      light.
      > > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do have to be aware
      > > that imposing comforting concepts on daily situations could
      > > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging realities.
      > > For example, I've learned how to identify certain sources of
      > > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas meditation in the
      > > morning, and then, when I come across them that day, compassion
      and
      > > friendliness arise immeditately rather than aversion, because
      I've
      > > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma practice, on the
      > > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to be aware of
      all
      > > the realities that are rising, no matter how unpleasant.
      > > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense it could
      seem
      > > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting to paint the
      > world
      > > in pretty colours.
      > > But the passage below reminds us that we're actually doing
      > > something in line with the natural potential people have to
      become
      > > more loving. There is a process at work in the world that we are
      > > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to impose something
      > > that's not there.
      > > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
      > > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas practice,
      even
      > if
      > > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my personal
      > > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most important,
      and
      > > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
      > >
      > > Metta,
      > > Phil
      > > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental formation that
      > > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones. So clearing
      out
      > > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not consciously
      intending
      > > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted passages about
      > > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
      > >
      > > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in the
      > Abhidhamma
      > > tradition
      > > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
      > > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon" <shar_63@h...>
      wrote:
      > > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of this practice
      > [of
      > > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether that the
      > possibility
      > > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May I have
      > happiness'
      > > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any individual have
      > > happiness
      > > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying something
      that
      > is
      > > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
      > > >
      > > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord with the
      > > potential
      > > > of a human being to expand our capacity for opening and caring
      > > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an individual or
      our
      > > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to include more
      > and
      > > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage that people
      have
      > > > reached throughout history, generations and generations of
      > people,
      > > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with love and
      > > compassion
      > > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost doesn't even
      have
      > a
      > > > reference point. It's just connecting with this free-flowing
      > warmth-
      > > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive, connected
      energy.
      > > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
      > > >
      > > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City Retreat,
      Berkeley
      > > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
      > > >
      > > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > May this be of benefit.
    • Philip
      HI Marissa! Yeah, it s a good group, for sure. But it s not in Japan. It s another Yahoo group. I still haven t found a sangha here in Japan, but I m not
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 11, 2004
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        HI Marissa!

        Yeah, it's a good group, for sure. But it's not in Japan. It's
        another Yahoo group. I still haven't found a sangha here in Japan,
        but I'm not looking. Seems to me it will come my way if and hwen the
        time is right.
        No, I haven't seen Lost in Translation, but I'd like to. The main
        characters sound interesting. I kind of regret that the film trots
        out some old stereotypes about Japanese people for laughs, but the
        fact is Tokyo can be weird in a very interesting way. Tokyo is its
        own country, the way New York is.

        Thanks for checking out Templeton, and asking about Joe. Sorry to
        hear things are still rough for you. I have faith that if you coninue
        brahma-viharas meditation in a dedicated way it will help to brighten
        your skies - but I don't know anything about the physiological side
        of depression - the brain chemistry.

        Metta,
        Phil

        --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
        <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
        > Dear Phil,
        > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
        > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago but
        > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying to
        > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have to
        > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
        > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a student
        > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October - Karma
        > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just for
        > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the way,
        > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did two
        > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
        > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
        > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
        > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and I
        > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
        > attending the pool for too long so I will keep looking
        > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling rough
        > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has got
        > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
        > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
        > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon. Lately
        > I've been
        > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
        > group.
        > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
        > realities rising
        > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for conceptual
        > work, and as
        > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
        > critical light.
        > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do have
        > to be aware
        > that imposing comforting concepts on daily situations
        > could
        > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
        > realities.
        > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
        > sources of
        > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
        > meditation in the
        > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
        > compassion and
        > friendliness arise immeditately rather than aversion,
        > because I've
        > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
        > practice, on the
        > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to be
        > aware of all
        > the realities that are rising, no matter how
        > unpleasant.
        > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
        > it could seem
        > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting to
        > paint the world
        > in pretty colours.
        > But the passage below reminds us that we're actually
        > doing
        > something in line with the natural potential people
        > have to become
        > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
        > that we are
        > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
        > impose something
        > that's not there.
        > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
        > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
        > practice, even if
        > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
        > personal
        > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
        > important, and
        > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
        >
        > Metta,
        > Phil
        > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
        > formation that
        > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones. So
        > clearing out
        > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
        > consciously intending
        > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted passages
        > about
        > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
        >
        > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
        > the Abhidhamma
        > tradition
        > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
        > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
        > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
        > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
        > this practice [of
        > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether that
        > the possibility
        > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May I
        > have happiness'
        > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
        > individual have
        > happiness
        > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
        > something that is
        > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
        > >
        > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
        > with the
        > potential
        > > of a human being to expand our capacity for opening
        > and caring
        > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
        > individual or our
        > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
        > include more and
        > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
        > that people have
        > > reached throughout history, generations and
        > generations of people,
        > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
        > love and
        > compassion
        > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
        > doesn't even have a
        > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
        > free-flowing warmth-
        > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
        > connected energy.
        > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
        > >
        > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
        > Retreat, Berkeley
        > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
        > >
        > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
        > >
        > >
        > > May this be of benefit.
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
        > Terms of Service.
        >
        >
        >
        ______________________________________________________________________

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      • Sharon
        Marissa, My husband and I just rented Lost in Translation too! :o) What struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I watched it, what Phil would think
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 12, 2004
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          Marissa,

          My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation" too! :o) What
          struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I watched it, what
          Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.

          In lovingkindness,

          Sharon

          --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
          <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
          > Dear Phil,
          > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
          > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago but
          > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying to
          > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have to
          > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
          > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a student
          > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October - Karma
          > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just for
          > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the way,
          > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did two
          > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
          > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
          > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
          > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and I
          > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
          > attending the pool for too long so I will keep looking
          > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling rough
          > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has got
          > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
          > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
          > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
          > ---------------------------------
          >
          > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon. Lately
          > I've been
          > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
          > group.
          > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
          > realities rising
          > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for conceptual
          > work, and as
          > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
          > critical light.
          > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do have
          > to be aware
          > that imposing comforting concepts on daily situations
          > could
          > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
          > realities.
          > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
          > sources of
          > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
          > meditation in the
          > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
          > compassion and
          > friendliness arise immeditately rather than aversion,
          > because I've
          > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
          > practice, on the
          > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to be
          > aware of all
          > the realities that are rising, no matter how
          > unpleasant.
          > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
          > it could seem
          > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting to
          > paint the world
          > in pretty colours.
          > But the passage below reminds us that we're actually
          > doing
          > something in line with the natural potential people
          > have to become
          > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
          > that we are
          > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
          > impose something
          > that's not there.
          > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
          > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
          > practice, even if
          > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
          > personal
          > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
          > important, and
          > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
          >
          > Metta,
          > Phil
          > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
          > formation that
          > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones. So
          > clearing out
          > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
          > consciously intending
          > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted passages
          > about
          > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
          >
          > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
          > the Abhidhamma
          > tradition
          > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
          > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
          > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
          > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
          > this practice [of
          > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether that
          > the possibility
          > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May I
          > have happiness'
          > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
          > individual have
          > happiness
          > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
          > something that is
          > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
          > >
          > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
          > with the
          > potential
          > > of a human being to expand our capacity for opening
          > and caring
          > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
          > individual or our
          > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
          > include more and
          > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
          > that people have
          > > reached throughout history, generations and
          > generations of people,
          > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
          > love and
          > compassion
          > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
          > doesn't even have a
          > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
          > free-flowing warmth-
          > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
          > connected energy.
          > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
          > >
          > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
          > Retreat, Berkeley
          > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
          > >
          > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
          > >
          > >
          > > May this be of benefit.
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          > Terms of Service.
          >
          >
          >
          ______________________________________________________________________

          > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
        • marissa weiler
          Dear Sharon, I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and the woman he becomes close friends with are in very lost transitional times in their lives.
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 14, 2004
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            Dear Sharon,
            I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and
            the woman he becomes close friends with are in very
            lost transitional times in their lives. Both don't
            feel needed (or wanted?) by their partners and seem to
            be "searching for meaning" and they are very lonely.
            How they healthfully "came together" and supported
            each other and really connected and meant an enormous
            amount to each other moved me in an extraordinary way.
            I think this "lost place in life" is somewhere most of
            us have been. They wanted to "be wanted", they wanted
            to "find human connection" and they did, and I thought
            it was great they didn't sexualize that role - as I
            assumed at first they would. These were two good
            people trying to navigate their journey and they were
            both somewhat lost - trying to find their place in
            life, trying to connect, trying to get more
            comfortable (the female character inparticular). Is
            that how you see it at all? I really enjoyed it! I was
            a little Sorry about Bill Murray's one night stand
            because I thought his care for his family shone
            through wonderfully although it seemed he didn't feel
            needed there - his wife could take care of everything.
            Murray, in particular seemed to be coming to terms
            with being restless. He was reconciling where his life
            was at but was at heart, I think, happy with what he
            had. The female character I loved and I could so
            relate to her sense of insecurity at times with her
            husband, who was so much more at home in his own skin
            and so much more outgoing and sadly away from her a
            lot - maybe a tad insensitive. They both were reaching
            out and needing to feel love and feel connection. I
            thought maybe the hustle bustle of Tokyo and a
            metaphor for how "out of control" their lives felt?
            Hmmm, maybe - just thinking out loud. As for
            stereotypes, I don't know much about Tokyo culture -
            did you think there were a lot of stereotypes? For
            future choices, "Diva" was recommended to me (made in
            the early 80's) and it's quite a film - give it a try!
            Have you seen "Pay It Forward"? I loved that film. In
            terms of films currently in theatres I want to see The
            Barbarian Invasions (made by Quebec/Canadian filmmaker
            Denys Arcand) and it is supposed to be fabulous. The
            other film I want to see is "The Dreamers about the
            famous year in Paris - 1968. We have a film currently
            playing here, made here, written by local people
            called "The Corporation" and it's fabulous - it
            compares the corporation to the DSM-IV definition of a
            psychopath - corps have no conscience. It's a really
            interesting premise. Let me know (anyone!) if you've
            seen a great video lately! Hugs and much metta,
            Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@...> wrote:
            ---------------------------------
            Marissa,

            My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation"
            too! :o) What
            struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I
            watched it, what
            Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.

            In lovingkindness,

            Sharon

            --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
            <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
            > Dear Phil,
            > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
            > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago
            but
            > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying
            to
            > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have
            to
            > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
            > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a
            student
            > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October -
            Karma
            > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just
            for
            > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the
            way,
            > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did
            two
            > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
            > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
            > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
            > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and
            I
            > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
            > attending the pool for too long so I will keep
            looking
            > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling
            rough
            > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has
            got
            > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
            > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
            > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
            > ---------------------------------
            >
            > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon.
            Lately
            > I've been
            > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
            > group.
            > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
            > realities rising
            > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for
            conceptual
            > work, and as
            > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
            > critical light.
            > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do
            have
            > to be aware
            > that imposing comforting concepts on daily
            situations
            > could
            > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
            > realities.
            > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
            > sources of
            > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
            > meditation in the
            > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
            > compassion and
            > friendliness arise immeditately rather than
            aversion,
            > because I've
            > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
            > practice, on the
            > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to
            be
            > aware of all
            > the realities that are rising, no matter how
            > unpleasant.
            > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
            > it could seem
            > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting
            to
            > paint the world
            > in pretty colours.
            > But the passage below reminds us that we're
            actually
            > doing
            > something in line with the natural potential people
            > have to become
            > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
            > that we are
            > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
            > impose something
            > that's not there.
            > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
            > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
            > practice, even if
            > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
            > personal
            > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
            > important, and
            > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
            >
            > Metta,
            > Phil
            > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
            > formation that
            > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones.
            So
            > clearing out
            > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
            > consciously intending
            > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted
            passages
            > about
            > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.

            >
            > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
            > the Abhidhamma
            > tradition
            > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
            >
            Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
            > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
            > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
            > this practice [of
            > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether
            that
            > the possibility
            > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May
            I
            > have happiness'
            > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
            > individual have
            > happiness
            > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
            > something that is
            > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
            > >
            > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
            > with the
            > potential
            > > of a human being to expand our capacity for
            opening
            > and caring
            > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
            > individual or our
            > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
            > include more and
            > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
            > that people have
            > > reached throughout history, generations and
            > generations of people,
            > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
            > love and
            > compassion
            > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
            > doesn't even have a
            > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
            > free-flowing warmth-
            > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
            > connected energy.
            > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
            > >
            > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
            > Retreat, Berkeley
            > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
            > >
            > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
            > >
            > >
            > > May this be of benefit.
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
            Yahoo!
            > Terms of Service.
            >
            >
            >
            ______________________________________________________________________

            > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca



            ---------------------------------
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            To visit your group on the web, go to:
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            Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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          • Philip
            Hi Marissa, and all. You make me want to see Lost in Translation, Marissa. I ll have to wait another few months until it comes here. And probably longer,
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 14, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Marissa, and all.

              You make me want to see Lost in Translation, Marissa. I'll have to
              wait another few months until it comes here. And probably longer,
              because I'll wait to see it on video. I'd be uncomfortable in a
              theatre with Japanese people watching the scenes where they are used
              too crudely in stereotypical ways to stress the alienation aspect.

              One of my favourite movies with a Buddhist feel to it is Magnolia.
              It's all about khamma. "You might think you're done with the past,
              but the past isn't done with you." It seems to be one of those love
              it or hate it movies, but I sure loved it. The songs by Aimee Mann
              are fantastic too.

              Metta,
              Phil

              --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
              <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
              > Dear Sharon,
              > I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and
              > the woman he becomes close friends with are in very
              > lost transitional times in their lives. Both don't
              > feel needed (or wanted?) by their partners and seem to
              > be "searching for meaning" and they are very lonely.
              > How they healthfully "came together" and supported
              > each other and really connected and meant an enormous
              > amount to each other moved me in an extraordinary way.
              > I think this "lost place in life" is somewhere most of
              > us have been. They wanted to "be wanted", they wanted
              > to "find human connection" and they did, and I thought
              > it was great they didn't sexualize that role - as I
              > assumed at first they would. These were two good
              > people trying to navigate their journey and they were
              > both somewhat lost - trying to find their place in
              > life, trying to connect, trying to get more
              > comfortable (the female character inparticular). Is
              > that how you see it at all? I really enjoyed it! I was
              > a little Sorry about Bill Murray's one night stand
              > because I thought his care for his family shone
              > through wonderfully although it seemed he didn't feel
              > needed there - his wife could take care of everything.
              > Murray, in particular seemed to be coming to terms
              > with being restless. He was reconciling where his life
              > was at but was at heart, I think, happy with what he
              > had. The female character I loved and I could so
              > relate to her sense of insecurity at times with her
              > husband, who was so much more at home in his own skin
              > and so much more outgoing and sadly away from her a
              > lot - maybe a tad insensitive. They both were reaching
              > out and needing to feel love and feel connection. I
              > thought maybe the hustle bustle of Tokyo and a
              > metaphor for how "out of control" their lives felt?
              > Hmmm, maybe - just thinking out loud. As for
              > stereotypes, I don't know much about Tokyo culture -
              > did you think there were a lot of stereotypes? For
              > future choices, "Diva" was recommended to me (made in
              > the early 80's) and it's quite a film - give it a try!
              > Have you seen "Pay It Forward"? I loved that film. In
              > terms of films currently in theatres I want to see The
              > Barbarian Invasions (made by Quebec/Canadian filmmaker
              > Denys Arcand) and it is supposed to be fabulous. The
              > other film I want to see is "The Dreamers about the
              > famous year in Paris - 1968. We have a film currently
              > playing here, made here, written by local people
              > called "The Corporation" and it's fabulous - it
              > compares the corporation to the DSM-IV definition of a
              > psychopath - corps have no conscience. It's a really
              > interesting premise. Let me know (anyone!) if you've
              > seen a great video lately! Hugs and much metta,
              > Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@h...> wrote:
              > ---------------------------------
              > Marissa,
              >
              > My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation"
              > too! :o) What
              > struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I
              > watched it, what
              > Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.
              >
              > In lovingkindness,
              >
              > Sharon
              >
              > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
              > <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
              > > Dear Phil,
              > > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
              > > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago
              > but
              > > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying
              > to
              > > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have
              > to
              > > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
              > > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a
              > student
              > > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October -
              > Karma
              > > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just
              > for
              > > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the
              > way,
              > > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did
              > two
              > > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
              > > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
              > > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
              > > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and
              > I
              > > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
              > > attending the pool for too long so I will keep
              > looking
              > > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling
              > rough
              > > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has
              > got
              > > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
              > > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
              > > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
              > > ---------------------------------
              > >
              > > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon.
              > Lately
              > > I've been
              > > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
              > > group.
              > > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
              > > realities rising
              > > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for
              > conceptual
              > > work, and as
              > > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
              > > critical light.
              > > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do
              > have
              > > to be aware
              > > that imposing comforting concepts on daily
              > situations
              > > could
              > > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
              > > realities.
              > > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
              > > sources of
              > > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
              > > meditation in the
              > > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
              > > compassion and
              > > friendliness arise immeditately rather than
              > aversion,
              > > because I've
              > > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
              > > practice, on the
              > > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to
              > be
              > > aware of all
              > > the realities that are rising, no matter how
              > > unpleasant.
              > > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
              > > it could seem
              > > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting
              > to
              > > paint the world
              > > in pretty colours.
              > > But the passage below reminds us that we're
              > actually
              > > doing
              > > something in line with the natural potential people
              > > have to become
              > > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
              > > that we are
              > > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
              > > impose something
              > > that's not there.
              > > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
              > > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
              > > practice, even if
              > > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
              > > personal
              > > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
              > > important, and
              > > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
              > >
              > > Metta,
              > > Phil
              > > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
              > > formation that
              > > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones.
              > So
              > > clearing out
              > > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
              > > consciously intending
              > > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted
              > passages
              > > about
              > > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
              >
              > >
              > > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
              > > the Abhidhamma
              > > tradition
              > > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
              > >
              > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
              > > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
              > > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
              > > this practice [of
              > > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether
              > that
              > > the possibility
              > > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May
              > I
              > > have happiness'
              > > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
              > > individual have
              > > happiness
              > > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
              > > something that is
              > > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
              > > >
              > > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
              > > with the
              > > potential
              > > > of a human being to expand our capacity for
              > opening
              > > and caring
              > > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
              > > individual or our
              > > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
              > > include more and
              > > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
              > > that people have
              > > > reached throughout history, generations and
              > > generations of people,
              > > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
              > > love and
              > > compassion
              > > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
              > > doesn't even have a
              > > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
              > > free-flowing warmth-
              > > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
              > > connected energy.
              > > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
              > > >
              > > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
              > > Retreat, Berkeley
              > > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
              > > >
              > > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > May this be of benefit.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              > Yahoo!
              > > Terms of Service.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              ______________________________________________________________________
              >
              > > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
              > Terms of Service.
              >
              >
              >
              ______________________________________________________________________

              > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
            • Sharon
              Phil, When you do see the movie, please tell us which aspects are exaggerated and stereotypical so that those of us who have never been to Japan can challenge
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 14, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Phil,

                When you do see the movie, please tell us which aspects are
                exaggerated and stereotypical so that those of us who have never been
                to Japan can challenge any wrong ideas we may have picked up in
                watching it.

                In lovingkindness,

                Sharon

                --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Philip" <plnao@j...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Marissa, and all.
                >
                > You make me want to see Lost in Translation, Marissa. I'll have
                to
                > wait another few months until it comes here. And probably longer,
                > because I'll wait to see it on video. I'd be uncomfortable in a
                > theatre with Japanese people watching the scenes where they are
                used
                > too crudely in stereotypical ways to stress the alienation aspect.
                >
                > One of my favourite movies with a Buddhist feel to it is
                Magnolia.
                > It's all about khamma. "You might think you're done with the past,
                > but the past isn't done with you." It seems to be one of those love
                > it or hate it movies, but I sure loved it. The songs by Aimee Mann
                > are fantastic too.
                >
                > Metta,
                > Phil
                >
                > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
                > <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                > > Dear Sharon,
                > > I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and
                > > the woman he becomes close friends with are in very
                > > lost transitional times in their lives. Both don't
                > > feel needed (or wanted?) by their partners and seem to
                > > be "searching for meaning" and they are very lonely.
                > > How they healthfully "came together" and supported
                > > each other and really connected and meant an enormous
                > > amount to each other moved me in an extraordinary way.
                > > I think this "lost place in life" is somewhere most of
                > > us have been. They wanted to "be wanted", they wanted
                > > to "find human connection" and they did, and I thought
                > > it was great they didn't sexualize that role - as I
                > > assumed at first they would. These were two good
                > > people trying to navigate their journey and they were
                > > both somewhat lost - trying to find their place in
                > > life, trying to connect, trying to get more
                > > comfortable (the female character inparticular). Is
                > > that how you see it at all? I really enjoyed it! I was
                > > a little Sorry about Bill Murray's one night stand
                > > because I thought his care for his family shone
                > > through wonderfully although it seemed he didn't feel
                > > needed there - his wife could take care of everything.
                > > Murray, in particular seemed to be coming to terms
                > > with being restless. He was reconciling where his life
                > > was at but was at heart, I think, happy with what he
                > > had. The female character I loved and I could so
                > > relate to her sense of insecurity at times with her
                > > husband, who was so much more at home in his own skin
                > > and so much more outgoing and sadly away from her a
                > > lot - maybe a tad insensitive. They both were reaching
                > > out and needing to feel love and feel connection. I
                > > thought maybe the hustle bustle of Tokyo and a
                > > metaphor for how "out of control" their lives felt?
                > > Hmmm, maybe - just thinking out loud. As for
                > > stereotypes, I don't know much about Tokyo culture -
                > > did you think there were a lot of stereotypes? For
                > > future choices, "Diva" was recommended to me (made in
                > > the early 80's) and it's quite a film - give it a try!
                > > Have you seen "Pay It Forward"? I loved that film. In
                > > terms of films currently in theatres I want to see The
                > > Barbarian Invasions (made by Quebec/Canadian filmmaker
                > > Denys Arcand) and it is supposed to be fabulous. The
                > > other film I want to see is "The Dreamers about the
                > > famous year in Paris - 1968. We have a film currently
                > > playing here, made here, written by local people
                > > called "The Corporation" and it's fabulous - it
                > > compares the corporation to the DSM-IV definition of a
                > > psychopath - corps have no conscience. It's a really
                > > interesting premise. Let me know (anyone!) if you've
                > > seen a great video lately! Hugs and much metta,
                > > Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Marissa,
                > >
                > > My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation"
                > > too! :o) What
                > > struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I
                > > watched it, what
                > > Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.
                > >
                > > In lovingkindness,
                > >
                > > Sharon
                > >
                > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
                > > <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                > > > Dear Phil,
                > > > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
                > > > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago
                > > but
                > > > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying
                > > to
                > > > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have
                > > to
                > > > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
                > > > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a
                > > student
                > > > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October -
                > > Karma
                > > > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just
                > > for
                > > > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the
                > > way,
                > > > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did
                > > two
                > > > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
                > > > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
                > > > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
                > > > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and
                > > I
                > > > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
                > > > attending the pool for too long so I will keep
                > > looking
                > > > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling
                > > rough
                > > > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has
                > > got
                > > > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
                > > > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
                > > > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
                > > > ---------------------------------
                > > >
                > > > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon.
                > > Lately
                > > > I've been
                > > > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
                > > > group.
                > > > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
                > > > realities rising
                > > > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for
                > > conceptual
                > > > work, and as
                > > > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
                > > > critical light.
                > > > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do
                > > have
                > > > to be aware
                > > > that imposing comforting concepts on daily
                > > situations
                > > > could
                > > > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
                > > > realities.
                > > > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
                > > > sources of
                > > > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
                > > > meditation in the
                > > > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
                > > > compassion and
                > > > friendliness arise immeditately rather than
                > > aversion,
                > > > because I've
                > > > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
                > > > practice, on the
                > > > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to
                > > be
                > > > aware of all
                > > > the realities that are rising, no matter how
                > > > unpleasant.
                > > > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
                > > > it could seem
                > > > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting
                > > to
                > > > paint the world
                > > > in pretty colours.
                > > > But the passage below reminds us that we're
                > > actually
                > > > doing
                > > > something in line with the natural potential people
                > > > have to become
                > > > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
                > > > that we are
                > > > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
                > > > impose something
                > > > that's not there.
                > > > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
                > > > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
                > > > practice, even if
                > > > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
                > > > personal
                > > > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
                > > > important, and
                > > > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
                > > >
                > > > Metta,
                > > > Phil
                > > > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
                > > > formation that
                > > > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones.
                > > So
                > > > clearing out
                > > > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
                > > > consciously intending
                > > > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted
                > > passages
                > > > about
                > > > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
                > >
                > > >
                > > > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
                > > > the Abhidhamma
                > > > tradition
                > > > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
                > > >
                > > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
                > > > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                > > > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
                > > > this practice [of
                > > > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether
                > > that
                > > > the possibility
                > > > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May
                > > I
                > > > have happiness'
                > > > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
                > > > individual have
                > > > happiness
                > > > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
                > > > something that is
                > > > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
                > > > >
                > > > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
                > > > with the
                > > > potential
                > > > > of a human being to expand our capacity for
                > > opening
                > > > and caring
                > > > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
                > > > individual or our
                > > > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
                > > > include more and
                > > > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
                > > > that people have
                > > > > reached throughout history, generations and
                > > > generations of people,
                > > > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
                > > > love and
                > > > compassion
                > > > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
                > > > doesn't even have a
                > > > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
                > > > free-flowing warmth-
                > > > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
                > > > connected energy.
                > > > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
                > > > >
                > > > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
                > > > Retreat, Berkeley
                > > > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
                > > > >
                > > > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > May this be of benefit.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ---------------------------------
                > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > >
                > > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                > > >
                > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > > >
                > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > > Yahoo!
                > > > Terms of Service.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                ______________________________________________________________________
                > >
                > > > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ---------------------------------
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
                > > Terms of Service.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                ______________________________________________________________________
                >
                > > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
              • Sharon
                Marissa, I think you hit the nail on the head about the movie. It was nice, too, to watch a movie that isn t all about pacing, effects, fast laughs, etc., but
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 14, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Marissa,

                  I think you hit the nail on the head about the movie. It was nice,
                  too, to watch a movie that isn't all about pacing, effects, fast
                  laughs, etc., but moved along more at the normal "pace of life," if
                  that makes sense. It's a very thoughtful movie.

                  In lovingkindness,

                  Sharon

                  --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
                  <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                  > Dear Sharon,
                  > I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and
                  > the woman he becomes close friends with are in very
                  > lost transitional times in their lives. Both don't
                  > feel needed (or wanted?) by their partners and seem to
                  > be "searching for meaning" and they are very lonely.
                  > How they healthfully "came together" and supported
                  > each other and really connected and meant an enormous
                  > amount to each other moved me in an extraordinary way.
                  > I think this "lost place in life" is somewhere most of
                  > us have been. They wanted to "be wanted", they wanted
                  > to "find human connection" and they did, and I thought
                  > it was great they didn't sexualize that role - as I
                  > assumed at first they would. These were two good
                  > people trying to navigate their journey and they were
                  > both somewhat lost - trying to find their place in
                  > life, trying to connect, trying to get more
                  > comfortable (the female character inparticular). Is
                  > that how you see it at all? I really enjoyed it! I was
                  > a little Sorry about Bill Murray's one night stand
                  > because I thought his care for his family shone
                  > through wonderfully although it seemed he didn't feel
                  > needed there - his wife could take care of everything.
                  > Murray, in particular seemed to be coming to terms
                  > with being restless. He was reconciling where his life
                  > was at but was at heart, I think, happy with what he
                  > had. The female character I loved and I could so
                  > relate to her sense of insecurity at times with her
                  > husband, who was so much more at home in his own skin
                  > and so much more outgoing and sadly away from her a
                  > lot - maybe a tad insensitive. They both were reaching
                  > out and needing to feel love and feel connection. I
                  > thought maybe the hustle bustle of Tokyo and a
                  > metaphor for how "out of control" their lives felt?
                  > Hmmm, maybe - just thinking out loud. As for
                  > stereotypes, I don't know much about Tokyo culture -
                  > did you think there were a lot of stereotypes? For
                  > future choices, "Diva" was recommended to me (made in
                  > the early 80's) and it's quite a film - give it a try!
                  > Have you seen "Pay It Forward"? I loved that film. In
                  > terms of films currently in theatres I want to see The
                  > Barbarian Invasions (made by Quebec/Canadian filmmaker
                  > Denys Arcand) and it is supposed to be fabulous. The
                  > other film I want to see is "The Dreamers about the
                  > famous year in Paris - 1968. We have a film currently
                  > playing here, made here, written by local people
                  > called "The Corporation" and it's fabulous - it
                  > compares the corporation to the DSM-IV definition of a
                  > psychopath - corps have no conscience. It's a really
                  > interesting premise. Let me know (anyone!) if you've
                  > seen a great video lately! Hugs and much metta,
                  > Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Marissa,
                  >
                  > My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation"
                  > too! :o) What
                  > struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I
                  > watched it, what
                  > Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.
                  >
                  > In lovingkindness,
                  >
                  > Sharon
                  >
                  > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
                  > <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                  > > Dear Phil,
                  > > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
                  > > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago
                  > but
                  > > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm trying
                  > to
                  > > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have
                  > to
                  > > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
                  > > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a
                  > student
                  > > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October -
                  > Karma
                  > > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just
                  > for
                  > > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the
                  > way,
                  > > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did
                  > two
                  > > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
                  > > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
                  > > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
                  > > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him and
                  > I
                  > > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
                  > > attending the pool for too long so I will keep
                  > looking
                  > > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling
                  > rough
                  > > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has
                  > got
                  > > worse) and the water while swimming and just gliding
                  > > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa. ---
                  > > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
                  > > ---------------------------------
                  > >
                  > > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon.
                  > Lately
                  > > I've been
                  > > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very insightful
                  > > group.
                  > > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
                  > > realities rising
                  > > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for
                  > conceptual
                  > > work, and as
                  > > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
                  > > critical light.
                  > > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do
                  > have
                  > > to be aware
                  > > that imposing comforting concepts on daily
                  > situations
                  > > could
                  > > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
                  > > realities.
                  > > For example, I've learned how to identify certain
                  > > sources of
                  > > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
                  > > meditation in the
                  > > morning, and then, when I come across them that day,
                  > > compassion and
                  > > friendliness arise immeditately rather than
                  > aversion,
                  > > because I've
                  > > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
                  > > practice, on the
                  > > other hand, would never do that, because we seek to
                  > be
                  > > aware of all
                  > > the realities that are rising, no matter how
                  > > unpleasant.
                  > > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a sense
                  > > it could seem
                  > > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting
                  > to
                  > > paint the world
                  > > in pretty colours.
                  > > But the passage below reminds us that we're
                  > actually
                  > > doing
                  > > something in line with the natural potential people
                  > > have to become
                  > > more loving. There is a process at work in the world
                  > > that we are
                  > > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
                  > > impose something
                  > > that's not there.
                  > > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
                  > > In any case, I will not give up my brahma-viharas
                  > > practice, even if
                  > > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
                  > > personal
                  > > liberation. Working for others' is what's the most
                  > > important, and
                  > > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
                  > >
                  > > Metta,
                  > > Phil
                  > > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
                  > > formation that
                  > > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome ones.
                  > So
                  > > clearing out
                  > > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
                  > > consciously intending
                  > > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted
                  > passages
                  > > about
                  > > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is important.
                  >
                  > >
                  > > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher in
                  > > the Abhidhamma
                  > > tradition
                  > > http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
                  > >
                  > Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
                  > > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                  > > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
                  > > this practice [of
                  > > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether
                  > that
                  > > the possibility
                  > > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say, 'May
                  > I
                  > > have happiness'
                  > > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
                  > > individual have
                  > > happiness
                  > > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are saying
                  > > something that is
                  > > > in accord with our potential and their potential.
                  > > >
                  > > > "We're actually saying something that is in accord
                  > > with the
                  > > potential
                  > > > of a human being to expand our capacity for
                  > opening
                  > > and caring
                  > > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
                  > > individual or our
                  > > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand to
                  > > include more and
                  > > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
                  > > that people have
                  > > > reached throughout history, generations and
                  > > generations of people,
                  > > > have reached the full capacity of connecting with
                  > > love and
                  > > compassion
                  > > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
                  > > doesn't even have a
                  > > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
                  > > free-flowing warmth-
                  > > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
                  > > connected energy.
                  > > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
                  > > >
                  > > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
                  > > Retreat, Berkeley
                  > > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
                  > > >
                  > > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > May this be of benefit.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ---------------------------------
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                  > >
                  > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                  > Yahoo!
                  > > Terms of Service.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  ______________________________________________________________________
                  >
                  > > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
                  > Terms of Service.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  ______________________________________________________________________

                  > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                • marissa weiler
                  Dear Sharon, I agree entirely about not worrying about the pacing, effects and fast meaningless laughs as happens in so many movies. Actually it also made me
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 14, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear Sharon,
                    I agree entirely about not worrying about the pacing,
                    effects and fast meaningless laughs as happens in so
                    many movies. Actually it also made me want to go to
                    Tokyo! Ahhh, another great recommendation -please see
                    it if you can! "Guaranteed Enlightenment"! Peace and
                    enjoy, Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@...>
                    wrote:
                    ---------------------------------
                    Marissa,

                    I think you hit the nail on the head about the movie.
                    It was nice,
                    too, to watch a movie that isn't all about pacing,
                    effects, fast
                    laughs, etc., but moved along more at the normal "pace
                    of life," if
                    that makes sense. It's a very thoughtful movie.

                    In lovingkindness,

                    Sharon

                    --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler
                    <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                    > Dear Sharon,
                    > I was really drawn to the fact that Bill Murray and
                    > the woman he becomes close friends with are in very
                    > lost transitional times in their lives. Both don't
                    > feel needed (or wanted?) by their partners and seem
                    to
                    > be "searching for meaning" and they are very lonely.
                    > How they healthfully "came together" and supported
                    > each other and really connected and meant an
                    enormous
                    > amount to each other moved me in an extraordinary
                    way.
                    > I think this "lost place in life" is somewhere most
                    of
                    > us have been. They wanted to "be wanted", they
                    wanted
                    > to "find human connection" and they did, and I
                    thought
                    > it was great they didn't sexualize that role - as I
                    > assumed at first they would. These were two good
                    > people trying to navigate their journey and they
                    were
                    > both somewhat lost - trying to find their place in
                    > life, trying to connect, trying to get more
                    > comfortable (the female character inparticular). Is
                    > that how you see it at all? I really enjoyed it! I
                    was
                    > a little Sorry about Bill Murray's one night stand
                    > because I thought his care for his family shone
                    > through wonderfully although it seemed he didn't
                    feel
                    > needed there - his wife could take care of
                    everything.
                    > Murray, in particular seemed to be coming to terms
                    > with being restless. He was reconciling where his
                    life
                    > was at but was at heart, I think, happy with what he
                    > had. The female character I loved and I could so
                    > relate to her sense of insecurity at times with her
                    > husband, who was so much more at home in his own
                    skin
                    > and so much more outgoing and sadly away from her a
                    > lot - maybe a tad insensitive. They both were
                    reaching
                    > out and needing to feel love and feel connection. I
                    > thought maybe the hustle bustle of Tokyo and a
                    > metaphor for how "out of control" their lives felt?
                    > Hmmm, maybe - just thinking out loud. As for
                    > stereotypes, I don't know much about Tokyo culture -
                    > did you think there were a lot of stereotypes? For
                    > future choices, "Diva" was recommended to me (made
                    in
                    > the early 80's) and it's quite a film - give it a
                    try!
                    > Have you seen "Pay It Forward"? I loved that film.
                    In
                    > terms of films currently in theatres I want to see
                    The
                    > Barbarian Invasions (made by Quebec/Canadian
                    filmmaker
                    > Denys Arcand) and it is supposed to be fabulous. The
                    > other film I want to see is "The Dreamers about the
                    > famous year in Paris - 1968. We have a film
                    currently
                    > playing here, made here, written by local people
                    > called "The Corporation" and it's fabulous - it
                    > compares the corporation to the DSM-IV definition of
                    a
                    > psychopath - corps have no conscience. It's a really
                    > interesting premise. Let me know (anyone!) if you've
                    > seen a great video lately! Hugs and much metta,
                    > Marissa. --- Sharon <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Marissa,
                    >
                    > My husband and I just rented "Lost in Translation"
                    > too! :o) What
                    > struck you the most about it? I was curious, as I
                    > watched it, what
                    > Phil would think of the portrayal of Japan.
                    >
                    > In lovingkindness,
                    >
                    > Sharon
                    >
                    > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, marissa weiler

                    > <marissa_weiler@y...> wrote:
                    > > Dear Phil,
                    > > This is awesome! The group sounds terrific and I
                    > > almost joined an Abhidhamma group about a year ago
                    > but
                    > > there was a complication. Well, one day. I'm
                    trying
                    > to
                    > > think of a Tibetan Buddhist group in Japan (I have
                    > to
                    > > remember where in Japan) that is supposed to be
                    > > amazing - just to pass alone. The teacher is a
                    > student
                    > > of Namgyal Rinpoche who passed away in October -
                    > Karma
                    > > Kagyu/Vajrayana Buddhism. I'll check and send just
                    > for
                    > > your info. Good luck with the Abhidhamma! By the
                    > way,
                    > > have you seen "Lost In Translation"? I finally did
                    > two
                    > > weeks ago on video and it has a good message. Oh,
                    > > Phil, I went to the pool! It was a refreshing,
                    > > relaxing experience. I asked 3 older gentlemen if
                    > > their name was Joe or if they have heard of him
                    and
                    > I
                    > > explained he is a regular. These guys haven't been
                    > > attending the pool for too long so I will keep
                    > looking
                    > > because I will definitely go again. I am feeling
                    > rough
                    > > as hell (does depression ever get better - it has
                    > got
                    > > worse) and the water while swimming and just
                    gliding
                    > > can be soothing. Peace and much metta, Marissa.
                    ---
                    > > Philip <plnao@j...> wrote:
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > >
                    > > This passage was good timing for me, Sharon.
                    > Lately
                    > > I've been
                    > > getting deep into Abhidhamma with a very
                    insightful
                    > > group.
                    > > Abhidhamma, which stresses being aware of ultimate
                    > > realities rising
                    > > and falling here and now, doesn't allow for
                    > conceptual
                    > > work, and as
                    > > a result I've seen my brahma-viharas practice in a
                    > > critical light.
                    > > There's no way I'm going to give it up, but I do
                    > have
                    > > to be aware
                    > > that imposing comforting concepts on daily
                    > situations
                    > > could
                    > > conceivably represent a strategy for dodging
                    > > realities.
                    > > For example, I've learned how to identify
                    certain
                    > > sources of
                    > > aversion, and include them in my brahma-viharas
                    > > meditation in the
                    > > morning, and then, when I come across them that
                    day,
                    > > compassion and
                    > > friendliness arise immeditately rather than
                    > aversion,
                    > > because I've
                    > > kind of programmed my mind to do so. Abhidhamma
                    > > practice, on the
                    > > other hand, would never do that, because we seek
                    to
                    > be
                    > > aware of all
                    > > the realities that are rising, no matter how
                    > > unpleasant.
                    > > Do you know what I mean? It's true that in a
                    sense
                    > > it could seem
                    > > that we who practice brahma-viharas are attempting
                    > to
                    > > paint the world
                    > > in pretty colours.
                    > > But the passage below reminds us that we're
                    > actually
                    > > doing
                    > > something in line with the natural potential
                    people
                    > > have to become
                    > > more loving. There is a process at work in the
                    world
                    > > that we are
                    > > deepening our awareness of - we're not trying to
                    > > impose something
                    > > that's not there.
                    > > That's not very clear - I've got a head cold.
                    > > In any case, I will not give up my
                    brahma-viharas
                    > > practice, even if
                    > > I see that it could in some way be obstructing my
                    > > personal
                    > > liberation. Working for others' is what's the
                    most
                    > > important, and
                    > > that's what brahma-viharas help us do.
                    > >
                    > > Metta,
                    > > Phil
                    > > p.s In Abhidhamma, metta is a wholesome mental
                    > > formation that
                    > > arises as a result of eliminating unwholesome
                    ones.
                    > So
                    > > clearing out
                    > > hindrances to metta is what it's about - not
                    > > consciously intending
                    > > metta. I think in the past Sharon has posted
                    > passages
                    > > about
                    > > hindrances to metta. I can see that it is
                    important.
                    >
                    > >
                    > > Here is a book about Metta written by a teacher
                    in
                    > > the Abhidhamma
                    > > tradition
                    > >
                    http://www.dhammastudyandsupport.com/book/Metta-
                    > >
                    >
                    Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism/Metta-Loving_Kindness_In_Buddhism.htm
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In Buddhaviharas@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon"
                    > > <shar_63@h...> wrote:
                    > > > ". . . it's actually very primary to the view of
                    > > this practice [of
                    > > > Bodhicitta] or the view of Buddhism altogether
                    > that
                    > > the possibility
                    > > > of human birth is enormous. And when we say,
                    'May
                    > I
                    > > have happiness'
                    > > > or 'May I be free of suffering' or 'May any
                    > > individual have
                    > > happiness
                    > > > and be free of suffering,' actually we are
                    saying
                    > > something that is
                    > > > in accord with our potential and their
                    potential.
                    > > >
                    > > > "We're actually saying something that is in
                    accord
                    > > with the
                    > > potential
                    > > > of a human being to expand our capacity for
                    > opening
                    > > and caring
                    > > > limitlessly. It starts out with our love for an
                    > > individual or our
                    > > > compassion for an individual. And it can expand
                    to
                    > > include more and
                    > > > more individuals, until finally there is a stage
                    > > that people have
                    > > > reached throughout history, generations and
                    > > generations of people,
                    > > > have reached the full capacity of connecting
                    with
                    > > love and
                    > > compassion
                    > > > which is limitless. Which is to say, it almost
                    > > doesn't even have a
                    > > > reference point. It's just connecting with this
                    > > free-flowing warmth-
                    > > > connected energy, flee-flowing, dynamic, alive,
                    > > connected energy.
                    > > > It's connecting with the true state of affairs."
                    > > >
                    > > > ~ Pema Chodron, "Bodhicitta & Aspiration," City
                    > > Retreat, Berkeley
                    > > > Shambhala Center June, 18, 2001
                    > > >
                    > > > http://www.shambhala.org/teachers/pema/asp.htm
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > May this be of benefit.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                    > >
                    > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
                    to:
                    > > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                    > Yahoo!
                    > > Terms of Service.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    ______________________________________________________________________
                    >
                    > > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Buddhaviharas/
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > Buddhaviharas-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                    Yahoo!
                    > Terms of Service.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    ______________________________________________________________________

                    > Post your free ad now! http://personals.yahoo.ca



                    ---------------------------------
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