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Re: Loyalists

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  • Ejk474@xxx.xxx
    Charles, I m not familiar with the Quieting of the Settlers on the Waldo Patent . This was raised by Bob Brooks in his reply to my original message. Ed
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 12, 1999
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      Charles,

      I'm not familiar with the "Quieting of the Settlers on the Waldo Patent".
      This was raised by Bob Brooks in his reply to my original message.

      Ed
    • charles brack
      Bob: I don t have a lot of information. My ancestor, Hugh Holmes was one of the so-called Pemaquid Heirs and there was a land dispute between the German and
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 12, 1999
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        Bob:
        I don't have a lot of information.

        My ancestor, Hugh Holmes was one of the so-called "Pemaquid Heirs" and there
        was a land dispute between the German and non-German colonists and it was
        resolved around 1764, I believe.

        If this is the land dispute we are referring to, Lincoln Co. has deeds for
        that land. There also has to be court records somewhere.

        Charles

        -----Original Message-----
        From: RCBrooks <rcbrooks@...>
        To: BroadBayMEGen@onelist.com <BroadBayMEGen@onelist.com>
        Date: Thursday, November 11, 1999 12:46 PM
        Subject: Re: [BroadBayMEGen] Loyalists


        >From: RCBrooks <rcbrooks@...>
        >
        >Ed Kelley --
        >
        >Wow! Did you catch my attention with this!
        >
        >-snip-
        >> It is believed that he joined Hayden's Company of The King's Rangers
        while it was passing through Maine on its way to defend PEI from attack.
        >
        >To my knowledge, the only Loyalist miltary unit in Maine during the
        >RevWar was a small group who apparently came from somewhere in that part
        >of Nova Scotia which is now New Brunswick to Fort George in what is now
        >Castine, Maine. I now can't pinpoint the date but suspect that it was
        >1783 almost two years after Cornwallis's surrrender and at at time when
        >everyone in Castine knew that the peace was being settled. At that time
        >(1782-'83), Castine was believed (hoped?) to be the westernmost
        >settlement on the British Canada side of the new border. The company
        >only numbered 12 or 15 persons and a list is found as an attachment in
        >one of the Loyalist's claims found in PRO AO 12/... or AO 13/... I did
        >not recognize any of the names on the list and can not recall who was
        >the commander. I do not recall any of the names as being Germanic or
        >Anglo-Germanic.
        >
        >To my knowledge, no Loyalist unit ever passed thru Maine. If they were
        >going to PEI, then it must be implied that they started somewhere to the
        >westward. WHERE DID THEY COME FROM? Brigadier Peleg Wadsworth and the
        >6th Regt. of Mass. Militia were stationed principally in what is now
        >Knox County until after Cornwallis's surrender. Col. John Allen
        >commanded forces out of Machias although I can't say without a bit of
        >research exactly when he disbanded.
        >
        >Who was 'Hayden' and were was he from?
        >
        >It has always been my impression that the Waldoboro boys all fought on
        >the American side of the RevWar. The only thing out of the ordinary re:
        >Waldoboro which I recall was that there was a German mercenary soldier
        >(Brunswicker) taken captive at the Battle of Bennington in VT in 1777
        >who was indentured to a Waldoboro farmer. After 458 Ansbach-Bayreuth
        >and Brunswick mercenary troops were sent to reinforce Castine in the
        >fall 1782, this indentured servant 'deserted' from Waldoboro and
        >rejoined the Brunswick troops at Castine. A report on this man is found
        >in the Captain Heinrich Cleve papers on microfilm of the photostats of
        >the German originals at the Library of Congress. Cleve was a Dutchman
        >who commanded the Brunswick detachment of 'recruits' at Castine.
        >
        >> Since many of the German settlers in Broad Bay were having such a
        >> difficult time obtaining title to their land, it is believed that
        >> some of their sons joined the loyalist units after be offered land
        >> grants for joining but, again, I have no proof of this.
        >
        >I do not claim to be an expert on Waldoboro; however, it is my
        >impression that the post-RevWar "Quieting the Settlers on the Waldo
        >Patent" included the sons & sons-in-law of Waldoboro settlers who had
        >'squatted' on land which was owned by the Waldo Heirs. An Act of the
        >Mass. legistature created a three man panel charged with laying out and
        >evaluating the 100 acres which best encompased the improvements of these
        >squatters. The "Honorable Commisioners" established the price which the
        >squatter could then purchase the land. Henry Knox (whose wife was a
        >Waldo granddaughter and who had purchased the hereditary rights of the
        >other Waldo heirs) gave reasonable payment (mortgage) terms. There are
        >two volumes at the Mass. Archives on this subject, one full volume re:
        >Prospect and the other vol. re: Waldoboro, Owls Head and various and
        >sundry other small plots.
        >
        >> Does anyone on the list have proof of any connection between Hayden's
        Company of The King's Rangers and the German community at Broad Bay.
        >
        >If anyone knows anything about this, please post it for all to read.
        >
        >Bob Brooks, Sandy Point ME
        >
        >
      • ejk474@xxx.xxx
        It seems that my original posting of 11 Nov 99 looking for persons who may be aware of a connection between Hayden s Company of The King s Rangers and the
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 12, 1999
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          It seems that my original posting of 11 Nov 99 looking for persons who may be aware of a connection between Hayden's Company of The King's Rangers and the German settlement at Broad Bay has turned into a discussion of land disputes in that area. This was not my intent.

          I mentioned that it may have been possible that some of the sons of the original German settlers joined the Loyalist unit as their parents were having problems obtaining title to the land from Samuel Waldo. I have no proof that anyone joined for that reason. In the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" the authors indicated that many of the original settlers were having problems obtaining a valid land title and that the reason, in many cases, was that they owed Samuel Waldo for all or part of their passage to America. I assumed that this may have been a valid reason for some sons to have joined a Loyalist unit since the British were offering land grants in exchange for service. It is quite possible that they joined for other reasons.

          My main purpose is to establish a link between German names in PEI and Broad Bay during that period of time. My ggg grandfather whose name was Frederick Praught was a member of The King's Rangers as was John Achorn. In the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" the authors have a John Achorn who they claim moved to PEI. In the book "An Island Refuge" which is a book about Loyalists and Disbanded Troops on the Island of Saint John (now PEI), they list John Achorn as coming from Broad Bay and being the son of Mattheu´┐Ż Eichhorn. Therefore, one link back to Broad Bay has been established.

          My question is - - does anyone know of others in the Broad Bay community that may have joined The King's Rangers regardless of the reason for joining? I am hoping to find a link between Frederick Praught and John Frederick Procht whose father was Peter Pracht of Broad Bay. I understand that the current day descendants are called Prock.

          Ed Kelley
        • RCBrooks
          Ed & Listers -- When Ed raised the possibility of The King s Rangers recruiting at Penobscot during the time the British occupied Castine, my immediate
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 27, 1999
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            Ed & Listers --

            When Ed raised the possibility of The King's Rangers recruiting at
            Penobscot during the time the British occupied Castine, my immediate
            reaction was "No way, Hosea!" as the only recollection I had was of a
            small muster list of loyalist soldiers attached to the Loyalist claim of
            a person who claimed to have spent some time at Penobscot and who also
            claimed to served as a Loyalist Ranger in Canada. As I did not
            recognize the name of the claimant or any of the names on the list, I
            assumed this was a Nova Scotian unit.

            Digging through some old files, I came upon a copy of a document I found
            in the Public Record Office in England more than 15 years ago. The
            document was in a box of loose papers (Ref: WO 60/33, pt. 1) and was
            entitled: "Abstract of the number of Men, Women and Children of the
            British and Foreign Regiments, New Levies, Civil Departments &ca &ca
            victualled at Halifax and its Dependencies." At that time, Fort George
            at Penobscot was an administrative dependency of the Halifax Commissary
            General. Because the list is rather short, I reproduce it here in its
            entirity as the family aspect of the British forces is not normally
            known.

            ORGANIZATION MEN WOMEN CHILDREN
            74th Regiment 520 62 92
            70th Regiment 4 3 1
            4th Bn Royal Artillery 6 5 11
            1st Battn Kings Rangers 3 5 8
            Engineering Department 10 - -
            Commissary General Dept 5 1 2
            Refugees 39 - -
            Inhabitants, averaged at 28 - -

            In the notes section: "Penobscot -- The Inhabitants employ'd on the
            publick Works vary so much that it is not possible to calculate with any
            precision." 'Inhabitants' worked as laborers on the construction of the
            fort in return for rations.

            As this list is for rations ('victualled') the fact that the Rangers had
            more women than men suggests that there were more males (troops) than
            those who received rations.

            I have also just corresponded with some historians knowledgeable on the
            subject of Loyalist troops. Here are some of their comments:

            "If I remember correctly, [Col.] Robert Rogers wrote a letter saying
            that he was present at the battle [at Penobscot] with some of his men."

            "Captain Jones (aka "Black Jones" apparently first battalion KR)
            conducted amphibious raids from the Penobscot area."

            "A Kings Ranger Lieutenant from the area mentions being used as marines
            in his Loyalist claim."

            "I did find a reference in the Carleton Papers to Hayden being present
            there [at Penobscot] at one time, but forget the date."

            "In a note of the printed version of William Bayard's loyalist claim it
            mentions that the King's Orange Rangers and Gorham's Fencible Americans
            were cited for assiting to build the works at Penobscot."

            The only logical way that the old drunk, Col. Robert Rogers, the
            commander of the King's Rangers, could have been 'at the battle' would
            have been if he and his troops were on the Naval relief fleet under Sir
            George Collier which routed the Americans in August 1779. This would be
            consistent with the perception that they were used as 'marines' on a
            shipboard assignment.

            Ed, where there is smoke, there usually is fire. I have documented
            above that the 1st Battalion of Kings Rangers (irregardless as to their
            small manning level) was at Penobscot in June 1782. While this does not
            prove recruiting at Waldoboro, it certainly opens up the possibility.
            Today bu car, it is between one hour plus 45 minutes and 2 hours to
            drive from Castine to Waldoboro -- say it is 75 miles -- okay, an hour
            and a half if you speed and take the back roads. By boat, it was in the
            1780s a day's trip down and about three-quarters of a day's trip back in
            prevaling winds and going through the islands.

            Bob Brooks, downeast on the coast of Maine
          • NStrands@xxx.xxx
            Hello, I have been following this discussion with interest. My ancestor Jacob Jung/Young, was part of the Waldoboro German colony with his father and siblings.
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 28, 1999
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              Hello,
              I have been following this discussion with interest. My ancestor Jacob
              Jung/Young, was part of the Waldoboro German colony with his father and
              siblings. He received a land grant in New Brunswick and is listed as having
              been part of the King's Orange Rangers. However, he also spent some time in
              Marblehead, Mass. as it was there that he married Rachel Ferguson. It is
              interesting to speculate that he may have been at Penobscot (and apparently,
              Rachel and the children too!)
              Nikki Strandskov
              Minneapolis
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