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Re: White House Beer Recipes & Porter

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  • Schmartz99
    So what you re saying is that if I, as a wealthy person after I win the lottery, employ a cook or other domestic staff and ask them to handle the production of
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 1, 2012
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      So what you're saying is that if I, as a wealthy person after I win the lottery, employ a cook or other domestic staff and ask them to handle the production of a homebrew kit in my home you think that it's against the law because somebody in the process was paid directly or indirectly to produce it? By that argument the home kitchen would have to be licensed as a commercial kitchen because I have an employee working in it preparing my food.

      If it's made for personal non-commercial consumption it's homebrew, regardless of whether somebody was doing it as part of their employment. The "paid" part of the law relates to sale of the finished product, not the production.


      Mike Schwartz


      --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "truebeerking1" <beerking1@...> wrote:
      >
      > As I see it (politics aside), the problem here is that violating Federal Alcohol Regulations is hardly good for our hobby. Sure, Obama may have bought the kit himself, BUT, he did not brew the beer himself. In fact, the guy who brewed the beer did it as part of his regular duties as the White House Chef. In other words, THE GUY GOT PAID TO BREW BEER. IFAIK, that can only be legal if you have a license to produce alcohol.
      >
    • kenneth sigler
      The key here has to be politics aside I think it is cool that after years of commercial lagers and no choice in beer. The president endorses our hobby or
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 1, 2012
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        The key here has to be politics aside I think it is cool that after years of commercial lagers and no choice in beer. The president endorses our hobby or passion in beer. And to say that he is to wealthy or important to do it isn't demeaning him but us by and our hobby

        From: Schmartz99
        Sent: 10/1/2012 9:42 AM
        To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: White House Beer Recipes & Porter

         



        So what you're saying is that if I, as a wealthy person after I win the lottery, employ a cook or other domestic staff and ask them to handle the production of a homebrew kit in my home you think that it's against the law because somebody in the process was paid directly or indirectly to produce it? By that argument the home kitchen would have to be licensed as a commercial kitchen because I have an employee working in it preparing my food.

        If it's made for personal non-commercial consumption it's homebrew, regardless of whether somebody was doing it as part of their employment. The "paid" part of the law relates to sale of the finished product, not the production.

        Mike Schwartz

        --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "truebeerking1" <beerking1@...> wrote:
        >
        > As I see it (politics aside), the problem here is that violating Federal Alcohol Regulations is hardly good for our hobby. Sure, Obama may have bought the kit himself, BUT, he did not brew the beer himself. In fact, the guy who brewed the beer did it as part of his regular duties as the White House Chef. In other words, THE GUY GOT PAID TO BREW BEER. IFAIK, that can only be legal if you have a license to produce alcohol.
        >

      • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
        A person who makes the home brew CANNOT be paid. Nothing about this has to do with sales. The Vid of the pres s beer stated that the brewer did this in his off
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 2, 2012
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          A person who makes the home brew CANNOT be paid.
          Nothing about this has to do with sales.
          The Vid of the pres's beer stated that the brewer
          did this in his off time and was unpaid... You can BET
          that it was NO accident that this statement was included.

          BillSF9c

          >
          So what you're saying is that if I, as a wealthy person after I win the lottery, employ a cook or other domestic staff and ask them to handle the production of a homebrew kit in my home you think that it's against the law because somebody in the process was paid directly or indirectly to produce it?

          >If it's made for personal non-commercial consumption it's homebrew, regardless of whether somebody was doing it as part of their employment. The "paid" part of the law relates to sale of the finished product, not the production.Mike Schwartz----------------
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