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Carboys

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  • Gregg Schroeder
    Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used? I m talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
      Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

      Thanks!!



      Sent from my iPhone


      On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

       

      On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
      in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
      hjsigmon wrote:

      >
      >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
      >
      If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
      tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
      chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
      the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
      using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
      immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
      the mash.

      If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
      sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
      tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
      of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
      can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
      puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
      through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
      crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
      seal.

      Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
      making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
      thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

      gds, stencil

    • Tom
      In a word NO. *Home of the Moon River Brewery and Delanco Vineyards *
      Message 2 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
        In a word NO.


        Home of the Moon River Brewery and Delanco Vineyards

        On 11/3/2011 7:41 AM, Gregg Schroeder wrote:
        Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

        Thanks!!



        Sent from my iPhone


        On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

         

        On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
        in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
        hjsigmon wrote:

        >
        >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
        >
        If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
        tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
        chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
        the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
        using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
        immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
        the mash.

        If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
        sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
        tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
        of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
        can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
        puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
        through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
        crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
        seal.

        Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
        making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
        thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

        gds, stencil

      • Ric Cunningham
        Water bottles are not designed for fermentation. They are not PET so they generally allow too much O2 transfer. Better Bottles are relatively cheap and easy to
        Message 3 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
          Water bottles are not designed for fermentation. They are not PET so they generally allow too much O2 transfer. Better Bottles are relatively cheap and easy to use and easy to maintain. 

          On Thu, Nov 3, 2011 at 5:41 AM, Gregg Schroeder <beercity23@...> wrote:
           

          Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

          Thanks!!



          Sent from my iPhone


          On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

           

          On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
          in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
          hjsigmon wrote:

          >
          >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
          >
          If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
          tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
          chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
          the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
          using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
          immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
          the mash.

          If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
          sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
          tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
          of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
          can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
          puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
          through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
          crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
          seal.

          Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
          making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
          thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

          gds, stencil




          --
          If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
        • Joe Strain aka Yodar
          Better Bottles are better because  they have more headspace  and they are NOT P.E.T. which have a tendsency to be permeable  to gases   Better Bottles are
          Message 4 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
            Better Bottles are better because  they have more headspace  and they are NOT P.E.T. which have a tendsency to be permeable  to gases
             
            Better Bottles are not that expensive are a far better value and can be ordered with drain-petcocks. I recommend them fully
            Yodar

            "The contest for ages has been to rescue
            liberty from the grasp of executive power."
            Daniel Webster

            From: Gregg Schroeder <beercity23@...>
            To: "BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com" <BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, November 3, 2011 7:41 AM
            Subject: [BrewEquip] Carboys

             
            Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

            Thanks!!



            Sent from my iPhone


            On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

             
            On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
            in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
            hjsigmon wrote:

            >
            >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
            >
            If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
            tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
            chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
            the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
            using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
            immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
            the mash.

            If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
            sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
            tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
            of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
            can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
            puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
            through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
            crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
            seal.

            Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
            making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
            thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

            gds, stencil


          • t2000kwt
            I would conditionally use them only for short periods of time. They would be fine for primary fermentation since that only lasts a few days or so. For
            Message 5 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
              I would conditionally use them only for short periods of time. They would be fine for primary fermentation since that only lasts a few days or so.

              For secondary fermentation for ales they might also be useful since secondary fermentation is often done and clearing has occurred within a week or two.

              Given that many have done primary and secondary in the white plastic bucket type fermenters without any noticeable oxidation issues, you may find them to be acceptable. I did a lot of brewing in those white plastic buckets, and had no problems with leaving the beer sit in them up to a month or so, but that is pushing it, really, and I wouldn't recommend doing that. (The spigots on those are difficult to clean and sanitize, but that's another issue.)

              However, I would not recommend them for any fermentations that take longer than that, like lagers, meads, melomels, or even ales that require a long aging time, like imperial stouts. Oxidation problems may be noticeable with those brews.

              If you are strapped for cash and have some of those plastic carboys, you may want to try them and see how well they work for you, with the above in mind when you do. If you notice any oxidation flavors, then discontinue using them.

              If you're able to buy the glass carboys, they're the best in the long run since they don't easily scratch inside over time from cleaning. But they can be dangerous. Better Bottles are safer but may not prove to be cost-effective if you use them a lot due to potential for scratching. They are made of a fairly hard plastic, so this may not be a problem for a long time.

              My answer to the danger with glass carboys possibly breaking while handling them is to not handle them directly. I place them in a plastic milk crate before use. Almost all of mine have a milk crate holding them. If the glass were to break, any pieces larger than a square inch would probably not go through the holes in the crate. Smaller pieces would be unlikely to rip your leg open like an unprotected carboy could if broken. The crates give you good handles to hold and balance the carboy more safely, too. I have the plastic-coated steel carboy neck holders but never trusted them. I never had an accident with them but I went to using the milk crates as I found them in yard sales, on the side of the road, and elsewhere.

              You may find glass carboys to be cheaper than the Better Bottle, but I haven't priced them for a long time. If you find them at yard sales or in thrift stores, they should be very cheap since you're not paying for shipping costs. You may be able to find them at the older, established bottled water companies for a decent price, too. It wouldn't hurt to call and find out.

              After reading about some of the accidents people have had with glass carboys, I wouldn't recommend using one without a milk crate or wooden box with handle holes (you could build one but make it sturdy).

              If you get a Better Bottle, find out (someone here can comment on this point) if the spigot is able to be completely disassembled to be cleaned and sanitized. If it isn't, consider getting one without a spigot and just use a siphon or Auto-Siphon to avoid the cleaning problems with some spigots.

              Whatever choice you make, it probably will get you started in brewing. You can make a different choice at a later time if you wish, once you know if you want to stay with the hobby.

              Donald

              --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Schroeder <beercity23@...> wrote:
              >
              > Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used? I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.
              >
              > Thanks!!
              >
              >
              >
              > Sent from my iPhone
              >
              >
              > On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:
              >
              > > On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
              > > in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
              > > hjsigmon wrote:
              > >
              > > >
              > > >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
              > > >
              > > If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
              > > tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
              > > chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
              > > the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
              > > using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
              > > immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
              > > the mash.
              > >
              > > If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
              > > sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
              > > tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
              > > of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
              > > can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
              > > puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
              > > through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
              > > crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
              > > seal.
              > >
              > > Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
              > > making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
              > > thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.
              > >
              > > gds, stencil
              > >
              >
            • Dave Witt
              Actually, YES. I use them for getting RO water from the local grocery. I also have one with RO water stored for use with StarSan. Fermentation......nah. Dave
              Message 6 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
                Actually, YES.  I use them for getting RO water from the local grocery.  I also have one with RO water stored for use with StarSan.
                 
                Fermentation......nah.
                 
                Dave W.


                From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom
                Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 7:34 AM
                To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Carboys

                 

                In a word NO.


                Home of the Moon River Brewery and Delanco Vineyards

                On 11/3/2011 7:41 AM, Gregg Schroeder wrote:
                Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

                Thanks!!



                Sent from my iPhone


                On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

                 

                On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
                in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
                hjsigmon wrote:

                >
                >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
                >
                If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
                tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
                chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
                the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
                using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
                immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
                the mash.

                If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
                sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
                tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
                of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
                can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
                puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
                through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
                crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
                seal.

                Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
                making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
                thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

                gds, stencil

              • Dave Witt
                Whoa! You said 10 gal? I never saw those. I use the 5 gal variety, but not for fermentation. Not that it can t be done... _____ From:
                Message 7 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
                  Whoa! You said 10 gal?  I never saw those.  I use the 5 gal variety, but  not for fermentation.  Not that it can't be done...


                  From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave Witt
                  Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 6:56 PM
                  To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [BrewEquip] Carboys

                   

                  Actually, YES.  I use them for getting RO water from the local grocery.  I also have one with RO water stored for use with StarSan.
                   
                  Fermentation......nah.
                   
                  Dave W.


                  From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom
                  Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 7:34 AM
                  To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Carboys

                   

                  In a word NO.


                  Home of the Moon River Brewery and Delanco Vineyards

                  On 11/3/2011 7:41 AM, Gregg Schroeder wrote:
                  Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

                  Thanks!!



                  Sent from my iPhone


                  On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

                   

                  On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
                  in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
                  hjsigmon wrote:

                  >
                  >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
                  >
                  If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
                  tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
                  chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
                  the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
                  using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
                  immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
                  the mash.

                  If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
                  sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
                  tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
                  of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
                  can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
                  puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
                  through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
                  crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
                  seal.

                  Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
                  making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
                  thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

                  gds, stencil

                • Gregg Schroeder
                  Maybe they are 5 gallon. It s whatever the normal bottle they deliver in is. 5 gal would be easier because that s what the recipe makes. Sent from my iPhone
                  Message 8 of 24 , Nov 3, 2011
                    Maybe they are 5 gallon.  It's whatever the normal bottle they deliver in is. 5 gal would be easier because that's what the recipe makes.  



                    Sent from my iPhone


                    On Nov 3, 2011, at 7:03 PM, "Dave Witt" <hammr5000@...> wrote:

                     

                    Whoa! You said 10 gal?  I never saw those.  I use the 5 gal variety, but  not for fermentation.  Not that it can't be done...


                    From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave Witt
                    Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 6:56 PM
                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [BrewEquip] Carboys

                     

                    Actually, YES.  I use them for getting RO water from the local grocery.  I also have one with RO water stored for use with StarSan.
                     
                    Fermentation......nah.
                     
                    Dave W.


                    From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom
                    Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 7:34 AM
                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Carboys

                     

                    In a word NO.


                    Home of the Moon River Brewery and Delanco Vineyards

                    On 11/3/2011 7:41 AM, Gregg Schroeder wrote:
                    Instead of better bottles or glass Carboys, can plastic water bottles be used?  I'm talking about the 10 gallon ones that culligan water man will deliver to the house.

                    Thanks!!



                    Sent from my iPhone


                    On Jul 19, 2011, at 9:49 AM, stencil <etcs.ret@...> wrote:

                     

                    On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 07:45:46 +0000,
                    in [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1030
                    hjsigmon wrote:

                    >
                    >I'm trying to keep from spending $50 each on thermowells from McMaster right now (and improving my skills on the lathe).
                    >
                    If your thermowell is installed through the sidewall of the
                    tun, then don't use it - just use a compression fitting or
                    chevron-packing stuffing box, so that the probe extends into
                    the mash directly. The only justification I can think of for
                    using a thermowell would be to protect the probe from
                    immersion which of course also protects it from the heat of
                    the mash.

                    If the probe is the capillary type, with a cylindrical brass
                    sensor head terminated by a pigtail of fine (like 14AWG)
                    tubing, you would want to support the sensor head at the end
                    of a couple of inches of brass tubing or rod. Since you
                    can't disconnect the capillary tube you have an interesting
                    puzzle trying to size the tubing so that the sensor passes
                    through it and yet be small enough so that you can "roll
                    crimp" it around the base of the sensor and get a watertight
                    seal.

                    Or just live with the discrepancy in displayed temperature by
                    making a calibration chart that permits correlating the
                    thermowell reading with the full-immersion temperature.

                    gds, stencil

                  • Schmartz99
                    There s no problem using the water dispenser jugs. I have a couple left that I still use, mostly for Mead. I ve been using them for 15 years and have never had
                    Message 9 of 24 , Nov 4, 2011
                      There's no problem using the water dispenser jugs. I have a couple left that I still use, mostly for Mead. I've been using them for 15 years and have never had any problems. You don't want to leave things in them longer than a couple weeks because after fermentation is complete they do allow a very small amount of oxygen into your beer. During fermentation the yeast will scavenge any oxygen that gets in and it can be beneficial to them. On the downside you have to be very careful with them because they aren't very durable and will scratch easily. The better bottles are a better choice but if you have a water jugs available (legally) they are a viable option.
                    • t2000kwt
                      Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn t use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that. Do you rack your mead
                      Message 10 of 24 , Nov 4, 2011
                        Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn't use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that.

                        Do you rack your mead into another container for a longer aging process, or do you bottle it pretty soon after primary fermentation is complete?

                        I see very small signs of fermentation activity even 3 or 4 months after primary fermentation is over. After a year, having bottled it, it still ferments a bit in the bottle and by about 3 months after bottling, it starts to foam when the caps are removed. It then becomes my brew of choice until it's gone so that I don't let it get to the point of exploding bottles.

                        I had a professional winemaker and meadmaker explain why it is that way, but he agreed that my approach was a good one. I'm sure if I left some in a bottle for a year or so it would burst the bottle. I've never had a burst bottle yet, and I don't want to have one, either.

                        Donald


                        --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "Schmartz99" <mjs@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > There's no problem using the water dispenser jugs. I have a couple left that I still use, mostly for Mead. I've been using them for 15 years and have never had any problems. You don't want to leave things in them longer than a couple weeks because after fermentation is complete they do allow a very small amount of oxygen into your beer. During fermentation the yeast will scavenge any oxygen that gets in and it can be beneficial to them. On the downside you have to be very careful with them because they aren't very durable and will scratch easily. The better bottles are a better choice but if you have a water jugs available (legally) they are a viable option.
                        >
                      • Mike & Lindsay Kennedy
                        1000 s of great bears are fermented every day in PET containers from buckets to barrels. Oxygen is good for fermentation as yeast need it to grow, so not an
                        Message 11 of 24 , Nov 4, 2011
                          1000's of great bears are fermented every day in PET containers from buckets to barrels. Oxygen is good for fermentation as yeast need it to grow, so not an issue. No chill (Google BIAB & No Chill) uses PET cubes to store unfermented wort (days, weeks, months) and can be purchased this way commercially, so clearly not a problem there. As for secondary fermentation you might have problems if you leave it in a secondary for longer than 6 weeks,this is more to do with yeast degradation than oxygen transfer issues but why would you as there is little evidance of benefit in the practice anyway. Oxygen is bad for Beer so I guess you wouldn't store it in one, but wait unless you are kegging or using glass then you are storing your finished be in plastic bottles which of course are ..... dada drum rolll ......... PET

                          The effect on the oxygen transfer is that you should drink your home brew within about 12 months of bottling. Not something I have never had a problem with ;)

                          Of course the better bottle people wouldn't agree because they want your money and essentially only people in the US use glass carboys routinely. Personally using glass for fermentation seems like a death defing act to me so I don't.

                          rgds mike

                          On Sat, Nov 5, as yeast need it 2011 at 09:11, t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                           

                          Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn't use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that.

                          Do you rack your mead into another container for a longer aging process, or do you bottle it pretty soon after primary fermentation is complete?

                          I see very small signs of fermentation activity even 3 or 4 months after primary fermentation is over. After a year, having bottled it, it still ferments a bit in the bottle and by about 3 months after bottling, it starts to foam when the caps are removed. It then becomes my brew of choice until it's gone so that I don't let it get to the point of exploding bottles.

                          I had a professional winemaker and meadmaker explain why it is that way, but he agreed that my approach was a good one. I'm sure if I left some in a bottle for a year or so it would burst the bottle. I've never had a burst bottle yet, and I don't want to have one, either.

                          Donald



                          --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "Schmartz99" <mjs@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > There's no problem using the water dispenser jugs. I have a couple left that I still use, mostly for Mead. I've been using them for 15 years and have never had any problems. You don't want to leave things in them longer than a couple weeks because after fermentation is complete they do allow a very small amount of oxygen into your beer. During fermentation the yeast will scavenge any oxygen that gets in and it can be beneficial to them. On the downside you have to be very careful with them because they aren't very durable and will scratch easily. The better bottles are a better choice but if you have a water jugs available (legally) they are a viable option.
                          >




                          --
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                          as safe as it gets." Unknown


                        • Schmartz99
                          I normally rack to a keg as soon as primary is done, 4 - 8 weeks. Almost all of my meads are completely done in 2 months. Except when I tried agave but
                          Message 12 of 24 , Nov 5, 2011
                            I normally rack to a keg as soon as primary is done, 4 - 8 weeks. Almost all of my meads are completely done in 2 months. Except when I tried agave but that's another story. I let it age in the keg for a while before bottling just for safeties sake.

                            --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, t2000kwt <no_reply@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn't use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that.
                            >
                            > Do you rack your mead into another container for a longer aging process, or do you bottle it pretty soon after primary fermentation is complete?
                            >
                          • Doug Rooney
                            Well, ya ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them. But as for me, I buy used stainless steel kegs from local
                            Message 13 of 24 , Nov 5, 2011

                              Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.

                              But as for me, I buy used stainless steel kegs from local brewery’s and have them modified for boil kettles and fermenters and I get AWESOME beers from them.

                              I don’t worry about them cracking or breaking, they do not permeate ANYTHING, they clean up easy and I can easily to up to a 12 gallon batch.

                              I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J

                               

                              Cheers

                               

                              Dr.Doug

                               

                              From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Schmartz99
                              Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 11:12 AM
                              To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys

                               

                               

                              I normally rack to a keg as soon as primary is done, 4 - 8 weeks. Almost all of my meads are completely done in 2 months. Except when I tried agave but that's another story. I let it age in the keg for a while before bottling just for safeties sake.

                              --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, t2000kwt <no_reply@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn't use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that.
                              >
                              > Do you rack your mead into another container for a longer aging process, or do you bottle it pretty soon after primary fermentation is complete?
                              >

                            • Denis Barsalo
                              Ditto.... :-) _____ From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Rooney Sent: November-05-11 3:26 PM To:
                              Message 14 of 24 , Nov 5, 2011
                                Ditto.... :-)


                                From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Rooney
                                Sent: November-05-11 3:26 PM
                                To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys

                                Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.

                                But as for me, I buy used stainless steel kegs from local brewery’s and have them modified for boil kettles and fermenters and I get AWESOME beers from them.

                                I don’t worry about them cracking or breaking, they do not permeate ANYTHING, they clean up easy and I can easily to up to a 12 gallon batch.

                                I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J

                                 

                                Cheers

                                 

                                Dr.Doug

                                 

                              • Joe Strain aka Yodar
                                please clarify the price you paid for SS kegs ...  decimal point or zero missing? I wouldn t pay $440.00 for ANY keg I saw a neighborhood lawn-contractor
                                Message 15 of 24 , Nov 5, 2011
                                  please clarify the price you paid for SS kegs ...  decimal point or zero missing?
                                  I wouldn't pay $440.00 for ANY keg
                                  I saw a neighborhood lawn-contractor pulling his gear-trailer bearing a BUD keg in the stack and asked him if he would take $20 for it and everybody was happy. Cost me another $20 for the plasma cutting


                                   
                                  Yodar

                                  "The contest for ages has been to rescue
                                  liberty from the grasp of executive power."
                                  Daniel Webster

                                  From: Doug Rooney <drooney57@...>


                                   
                                  Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.

                                  I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J
                                   
                                  Cheers
                                   
                                  Dr.Doug
                                   
                                • Doug Rooney
                                  Sorry, my ‘auto-corrector’ changed it, I paid $40 each. As in forty dollars J From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Nov 6, 2011

                                    Sorry, my ‘auto-corrector’ changed it, I paid $40 each. As in forty dollars J

                                     

                                    From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joe Strain aka Yodar
                                    Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 1:14 PM
                                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys

                                     

                                     

                                    please clarify the price you paid for SS kegs ...  decimal point or zero missing?

                                    I wouldn't pay $440.00 for ANY keg

                                    I saw a neighborhood lawn-contractor pulling his gear-trailer bearing a BUD keg in the stack and asked him if he would take $20 for it and everybody was happy. Cost me another $20 for the plasma cutting

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                    Yodar

                                    "The contest for ages has been to rescue
                                    liberty from the grasp of executive power."
                                    Daniel Webster


                                    From: Doug Rooney <drooney57@...>

                                     

                                    Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.

                                     

                                    I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J

                                     

                                    Cheers

                                     

                                    Dr.Doug

                                     

                                  • Joe Strain aka Yodar
                                    TODAY, SIR, That is (As we say in the Gun Tradin bidness ) is an ALL-HEART-DEAL   Yodar The contest for ages has been to rescue liberty from the grasp of
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Nov 6, 2011
                                      TODAY, SIR, That is (As we say in the Gun Tradin' bidness') is an "ALL-HEART-DEAL"

                                       
                                      Yodar

                                      "The contest for ages has been to rescue
                                      liberty from the grasp of executive power."
                                      Daniel Webster

                                      From: Doug Rooney <drooney57@...>
                                      To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Sunday, November 6, 2011 11:49 AM
                                      Subject: RE: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys

                                       
                                      Sorry, my ‘auto-corrector’ changed it, I paid $40 each. As in forty dollars J
                                       
                                      From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joe Strain aka Yodar
                                      Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 1:14 PM
                                      To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys
                                       
                                       
                                      please clarify the price you paid for SS kegs ...  decimal point or zero missing?
                                      I wouldn't pay $440.00 for ANY keg
                                      I saw a neighborhood lawn-contractor pulling his gear-trailer bearing a BUD keg in the stack and asked him if he would take $20 for it and everybody was happy. Cost me another $20 for the plasma cutting
                                       
                                       
                                       
                                      Yodar
                                      "The contest for ages has been to rescue
                                      liberty from the grasp of executive power."
                                      Daniel Webster

                                      From: Doug Rooney <drooney57@...>

                                       
                                      Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.
                                       
                                      I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J
                                       
                                      Cheers
                                       
                                      Dr.Doug
                                       


                                    • Mike & Lindsay Kennedy
                                      Hey Dr Doug Want to contribute a description and diagram of your modifications? Would love to see how you convert one into a fermenter. especially as I just
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Nov 15, 2011
                                        Hey Dr Doug

                                        Want to contribute a description and diagram of your modifications? Would love to see how you convert one into a fermenter. especially as I just happen to have one lying around

                                        rgds 

                                        On Sun, Nov 6, 2011 at 06:25, Doug Rooney <drooney57@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        Well, ya’ll use plastic or glass or whatever you want, and I am sure you get decent beers from them.

                                        But as for me, I buy used stainless steel kegs from local brewery’s and have them modified for boil kettles and fermenters and I get AWESOME beers from them.

                                        I don’t worry about them cracking or breaking, they do not permeate ANYTHING, they clean up easy and I can easily to up to a 12 gallon batch.

                                        I paid 440 each and traded for the welding, of course YMMV and perhaps you are not into brewing like I am, but if you ever are… I’m just saying J

                                         

                                        Cheers

                                         

                                        Dr.Doug

                                         

                                        From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Schmartz99
                                        Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 11:12 AM
                                        To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: Carboys

                                         

                                         

                                        I normally rack to a keg as soon as primary is done, 4 - 8 weeks. Almost all of my meads are completely done in 2 months. Except when I tried agave but that's another story. I let it age in the keg for a while before bottling just for safeties sake.

                                        --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, t2000kwt <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Since I usually ferment my meads for about a year before bottling them, I wouldn't use the regular (permeable) water bottles for that.
                                        >
                                        > Do you rack your mead into another container for a longer aging process, or do you bottle it pretty soon after primary fermentation is complete?
                                        >




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